THROWBACK THURSDAYS

SID: Superman is Dead

Dennis Morris and Shepard Fairey currently have an exhibition on called SID: SUPERMAN IS DEAD, which features paintings, prints and photographs of Sid Vicious, along with a life-size replica of a hotel room destroyed by Sid in 1977.

Sid Vicious

Sid Vicious

Shepard Fairey’s SUBLIMINAL PROJECTS will be transported back to 1977 Britain beginning 8 pm Friday, December 13 when Fairey and internationally renowned, British photographer Dennis Morris host the opening of SID: Superman Is Dead. The show will feature collaborative paintings, photographs and prints of, and inspired by, Sid Vicious’ tenure as the Sex Pistols’ bassist.

Born John Simon Ritchie, Vicious’ time with the Pistols was as brief as it was chaotic and legendary. Since his death in early 1979 at the age of 21, Sid has been immortalized as a punk rock icon in countless posthumous recordings, films, T-shirts, action figures etc. SID: Superman Is Dead is possibly the ultimate of these tributes, its centerpiece being a recreation of a hotel room trashed by Sid in a fit of intoxication, rage and depression during the infamous S.P.O.T.S. (Sex Pistols On Tour Secretly) tour of 1977, during which the Pistols were forced to play every date under pseudonyms to avoid cancellation.

The SID: Superman Is Dead opening reception will also feature a once in a lifetime live musical homage to Sid in the form of Ritchie Love, an exclusive assemblage of his contemporaries from the original punk rock era. The band is comprised of Sex Pistols guitarist, co-founder and Vicious band mate Steve Jones; Generation X co-founder Billy Idol, who ran with early Pistols support gang the Bromley Contingent; Bow Wow Wow co-founder and early Adam & The Ants guitarist Leigh Gorman; and Blondie co-founder and erstwhile Ramones and Iggy Pop drummer Clem Burke.

The Sex Pistols changed my life when I discovered them in 1984. Their music alone made my arm hairs stand up, but their image and attitude were just as important and powerful. The member of the Sex Pistols who I was drawn to and most epitomized the punk image for me was Sid Vicious, with his spiked hair, leather jacket, lock necklace, and reckless behavior. At 14 I was mesmerized by Sid and made my first homemade t-shirt of him snarling his lip defiantly. I was rebelling, looking for any way to irritate my parents and, before I knew better, Sid was my Superman. Sid self-destructed young and with punk’s slogans like “No Future” and “Live Fast, Die Young,” Sid was everything the Superman, anti-hero, or cliché of a nihilistic movement called for. Sid didn’t really do much to shape punk music… he only actually played on two songs on Never Mind the Bollocks Here’s The Sex Pistols. However, Sid’s surly vocals kick ass on C’mon Everybody, Somethin’ Else, and My Way. Sid remains one of punk’s most enduring icons even if he is a classic example of style over substance. I was a sucker for Sid’s image as a teenager, and I still am, even though I see him as less “cool” and more tragic and cautionary these days. I have made many images of Sid over the years, and I thought I had retired him as a subject until Dennis Morris – the photographer of the most intimate and iconic shots of Sid-approached me about a collaboration. Dennis’s archive provided an amazing treasure trove of Sid images to work from in creating the paintings and prints in the “Superman Is Dead” show. I’m so glad I got to do Dennis’s Sid images “My Way”! I can now retire Sid as a subject. I’ve worked with the best, I can skip the rest.” – Shepard Fairey

Working from the title, S.I.D (Superman is Dead), these photographs sum up/represent the image Sid portrayed of himself to the public. He was hero, villain, fearless, innocent and like a supernova, he shone bright, lived fast, died young. Punk needed a hero, Sid became that hero / anti-hero. The idea for the exhibition came from a mutual admiration and respect of each other’s work (for Shepard and I). When Shepard and I eventually met, the exhibition was born on that first meeting. It had to happen. And a happening it will be!” – Dennis Morris

THROWBACK THURSDAYS

Yann Gross

Yann Gross / Kitintale
2008 – in progress

Photographer Yann Gross started this project of documenting skateboarding in the Kampala area of Uganda, and the first East African skatepark constructed by local kids, in 2008.

“Yann Gross is passionate about skateboarding and always takes his deck on his journeys. During one of his trips to Eastern Africa, he encounters a group of skaters, known for having built the first and only half-pipe in Uganda. Located in Kitintale, in the popular suburbs of Kampala, Gross is immediately seduced by this vernacular infrastructure and the integrative function it plays among the local youth. Given the area’s contingencies, the lack of material in particular, skateboarding becomes a collective sport that produces a whole new range of styles and unprecedented tricks. Having shared its daily life for several months, Gross finally becomes a full-fledged member of the group, to the point he even co-organises the first skateboarding contest in the African Great Lakes region. In parallel to these anecdotes, his insider’s view makes him a privileged analyst of the ways this sport strengthens ties and fosters dreams among this micro-community. Kitintale goes thus beyond mere documentary narratives, trendy clichés or paternalistic discourses and offers both a humanistic and a symmetrical account of contemporary changes in Africa.” – Joel Vacheron

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

Yann Gross

RESOBORG MADIBA PASTE UP

Resoborg Madiba Paste Up

Local Durban artist Wesley van Eeden and a friend decided to do a fun paste up in honour of Madiba’s passing. They did it at the Durban beachfront skatepark instead of the location they originally intended after being physically attacked by some angry landlords.

Resoborg

Resoborg

Resoborg

Resoborg

Resoborg

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Seeing as Anchorman 2 is coming out soon (20 December) we thought we’d pay tribute to Will Ferrell with today’s Tattoo Tuesdays.

LOST/FOUND EXHIBITION PHOTO GALLERY

lost found Exhibition

The lost/found Exhibition took place at Revolution Woodstock last week Thursday. It was a huge success. Not only were there some incredible artworks exhibited, but it was also the launch of the Verb Artist Series decks by artists Daniel Ting Chong, Justin Southey, Hanno van Zyl, Jade Klara, Jaco Haasbroek and Gerhard Human. The Kraken Rum kept the social juices flowing, and Roastin’ Records kept everyone stoked with their DJing. Milkshed, the non-profit that a portion of proceeds from the exhibition will go to, were there as well, and displayed some beautiful furniture made from reclaimed wood; a children’s bicycle, a small set of table and chairs, a lamp, and some rad stationary holders for your desk. We also put out one of the new Verb DIY decks and let people draw on it. The exhibition was packed, art was appreciated and sold, and everyone had a good time.

Thanks so much to everyone who came to the exhibition opening last night! A special thanks to Simon and Candice for curating, The Kraken Rum, Roastin’ Records, Milkshed, the artists that exhibited their work, and the artists who collaborated with Verb for the Artists Series skateboard decks. We are really proud of the series.

The exhibition is still running for another week, so feel free to drop by anytime (when we’re open obviously) and browse the art.

Revolution Woodstock Exchange, Cape Town: (021) 447 6801 / woodstock@revolution.co.za

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

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lost found Exhibition

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lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

lost found Exhibition

NEW VERB ARTIST SERIES DECKS

We give you the new Verb Artist Series range of decks from Daniel Ting Chong, Gerhard Human, Hanno van Zyl, Jade Klara, Jaco Haasbroek, and Justin Southey.

Limited edition.
Custom ply set up.
Canadian Maple.
Exclusive graphics.

Click on any of the images below to take you through to the item on Revolution Online:

Verb “Daniel Ting Chong” Artist Series 8.125

Verb “Gerhard Human” Artist Series 8.25

Verb “Hanno van Zyl” Artist Series 8.25

Verb “Jaco Haasbroek” Artist Series 7.875

Verb “Jade Klara” Artist Series 8.25

Verb “Justin Southey” Artist Series 8.0

Available now from Revolution stores nationwide and from Revolution Online.

Revolution Cresta, Gauteng: (011) 678 1685 / cresta@revolution.co.za
Revolution Menlyn, Gauteng: (012) 348 2959 / menlyn@revolution.co.za
Revolution Long Street, Cape Town: (021) 423 3482 / longstreet@revolution.co.za
Revolution Woodstock Exchange, Cape Town: (021) 801 4666 / woodstock@revolution.co.za
Revolution Online: http://www.revolutiononline.co.za/

LOST/FOUND EXHIBITION OPENS TONIGHT

lost found exhibition

Revolution presents:

lost / found

Verb 2013 Artist Series Range Launch
&
lost/found: an exhibition of exploration

Verb Artist Skateboard Range 2013:
Daniel Ting Chong
Gerard Human
Hanno Van Zyl
Jade Klara
Justin Southey
Jaco Haasbroek

And artists:
Paul Senyol
Simon Berndt
Jason de Villiers
Dani Loureiro
Ninja Bread Boy
Motel 7
Justin Poulter
Cassandra Johnson
Nicola De Jager
Matthew Oldfield
Candice Jezek aka Z
Chris Valentine
Michael Dos Ramos

DJ’s on vinyl from Roastin’ Records

Cash bar

Opening:
28 November 2013
7 – 10pm

Good to know:
A portion of proceeds from the evening will go to Milkshed; a not-for-profit business that uses reclaimed wood to create furniture and rebuild schools.

Revolution, The Woodstock Exchange, 66 Albert Road, Woodstock

021 447 6801

Verb | ROASTIN’ RECORDS – Cape Town | Revolution | The Kraken Rum | Milkshed

REDOK: A SOLO EXHIBITION BY DALEAST

Redok a Solo Exhibition by DALeast

South African artist, DALeast, has a solo exhibition on at the moment, called REDOK, on at The Outsiders Gallery in Newcastle, England.

The most exciting young artist on the global stage graces Tyneside this winter.

DALeast’s solo exhibition REDOK – a Tibetan phrase meaning “hope and fear” – features animal paintings in traditional portrait formats, taking inspiration from commissioned works of the early modern era. The portraits are painted in the artist’s distinctive, inspiring style. They include the tea-stained backgrounds, which he lovingly builds over many months, that feature on many of his bravura gallery pieces.

REDOK also includes study sketches, a video installation, and two limited edition etchings created by the artist at our Execution Dock print studio, titled Circulated Dawn and Circulated Dusk, each from a signed and numbered edition of 50, measuring 62.5cm x 50cm, and priced at £225.

The etchings will first be made available to those attending the exhibition preview at The Outsiders Newcastle, which takes place from 6pm until 9pm on Thursday the 21st of November, at which sales will be strictly limited to a maximum of one of each of the two editions per person per household. There will be no exceptions to this, and no pre-orders taken for those unable to attend the exhibition in person.

Any remaining editions will be made available to purchase online from The Outsiders website the following day, Friday 22nd of November, at 4pm UK time.

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

We came across the work of Dan Sinnes, and though it was pretty amazing. Dan works at Luxembourg Electric Ave. Tattoo in Western Europe.

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

Tattoo by Dan Sinnes

NATIVE NOSTALGIA EXHIBITION

Native Nostalgia

Native Nostalgia

On now!

Venue: The Museum of African Design
Address: 281 Commissioner Street, Johannesburg

Native Nostalgia
by Aaron Kohn

This exhibition tells the stories of bygone eras by positioning them firmly within present day narratives. Through architecture, construction, cartography, photography, communal archives, and historical reenactment, each artist and participant has a conversation with a past though which they did not live by juxtaposing the design elements of the past with those of today.

The exhibition title comes from Jacob Dlamini’s 2009 Native Nostalgia, in which he probes the ethical justification for fond memories of a childhood in a South African township. How, he asks, can a black South African can reflect on something so deplorable with nostalgia? The works in this show represent a related form of nostalgia: the nostalgia for a troubled time through which one did not live.

For example, Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou reflects on the narrative of Benin’s capital, Porto Novo, through the traditional role of women, ceremonial masks, and the Aguda architectural style largely brought back from Brazil by slaves who were deported from there after the early-1800s slave revolts. The designs in the women’s fabrics and masks, as well as the topless dress, contrast with the peeling paint and ornate Portuguese-style woodwork. On top of that, the portraiture itself is unquestionably contemporary.

Meanwhile, I See A Different You’s 19[ ] Mercedes [MODEL] is parked in the middle of the gallery, a physical specimen of design that the duo drive in their everyday life. Rather than bask in the glory of contemporary vehicular stylings, I See a Different You lives with one foot firmly planted in the political and [artistic/creative/design] past. Their other foot allows their work to depict similar contemporary appropriations of historical design elements.

These juxtapositions are reflective of a broader trend toward nostalgia. For South Africans in their early twenties and younger, South Africa is defined more by the post-1994 intersection of Mandela-style reconciliation and rapid globalization than it is by the struggle against Apartheid. Perhaps because they did not live through the darker days of Apartheid, twenty-somethings buy domestic worker outfits for parties and listen to house music alongside older Marabi jazz.

The works in this exhibition display the deep complexity of Native Nostalgia.

There is also multi media spatial intervention by the Kalashnikovv Gallery and Cuss ZA.

Cuss Artist Statement – INDODA
Creative Direction – Mina Lundgren x Ravi Govender
Performance – Simiso Zwane
Music – Zamani Xolo x Simiso Zwane

This collaboration between Swedish designer Mina Lundgren and myself Ravi Govender see’s us focussing on the Kanga textile and its graphic motifs with reference to its place in Zulu culture. The Khanga itself has been appropriated by diviners across South Africa as part of their dress code, and has strong varied meaning as a result. Themes from Zulu culture, such as strength and masculinity, power and the introduction of the false prophet into contemporary culture are also focussed on. The idea was to create a costume for a character that embodies these features. To aesthetically personify mysticism that is present in an expression that is current to africa. It is to also bridge the gap between international representation, with the creation of a fashion video installation. For this, the technique of green screen is incorporated to enhance the visual
aesthetic of movement and work with the idea of lo-fi video production across the continent.

Kalashnikovv Gallery Statement

The Cuss x Kalashnikovv Gallery Spatial Intervention Installation, involves the fusion of curator and artist into a singular manifestation of two specific roles in the art world. Creating a disjunction and thus a new degree of innovation between these two traditional roles by combining them into one, everything in the installation is considered to question these roles and utilized this combination for maximum impact within the physical space (moad). Rendering curator, mode of display, installation, artwork and other multi media into one all encompassing experience.

Facebook event link: http://www.facebook.com/events/246653855492511/

NUART 2013: THE FINAL VIDEO

The NuArt Festival takes place in Stavanger, Norway, every year. Street and public artists come together to create an annual project, combining art, city planning and street interventions. This year’s line-up of artists included our very own Faith47 and DALeast, along with international artists David Choe, Vhils, ROA, Martha Cooper, M-City, Aiko, Hush, and more. Here’s a video recap.

http://www.nuartfestival.no/home

JUSTIN SOUTHEY INTERVIEW

Justin Southey Day Dreamer

Justin Southey is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I have always been secretly envious of the fact that Bruce Mackay got to do one in your last release, so I was very stocked when Verb approached me to do a board of my own.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I found a wife, and lost my spare time.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I happened to be overseas when I was asked to design a board, so it felt right to make a board about ocean adventures, the discovering of new lands and strange creatures, and of course the illusive search for hidden treasure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Great, I do the occasional drop of street art, so I am used to people trashing, stealing, and adding to my artwork.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I love doing work on different mediums and for different applications, so I am stoked to get the opportunity to try doing it for a skateboard.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Draw. Erase. Redraw. Save (& send).

Come see Justin’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Justin’s work:

Justin Southey Day Dreamers

Justin Southey In Your Head

Justin Southey Podium

Justin Southey Sexy Times

Justin Southey Mountain Retreat

Justin Southey Street Love

Hanno van Zyl Interview

Hanno van Zyl

For The AssemblyFor The Assembly. Brush and Ink.

Hanno van Zyl is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I grew up skateboarding; I have always been surrounded by skateboarders and I have always been influenced by skate culture. I think it has helped me to understand what the value of counter culture is and instilled me with a more questioning nature. It has always been a personal goal to design my own board graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

Hope.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to design something that specifically acknowledges the fact that it is on a skateboard. That would mean that it will get completely trashed after about two days of use. I wanted to take this into account and implicate the skater as part of the artwork. ‘Hot chicks’ were a stock-standard graphic option for skateboarding brands (think of the iconic Hook-ups brand) and was hugely popular when I was a teenage skater. I offer a slightly more honest and sinister look at this stylistic trademark and how it interacts with the idea of female objectification and the male gaze.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I tried to work that fact into the concept and made it an intrinsic part of the piece.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I don’t believe that a “normal canvas” exists. The medium is part of the message and I feel that every piece an artist does should be self-aware and critical of the space that it inhabits. The fact that I will essentially collaborate with a whole bunch of skaters to create unexpected new results is what excites me the most about this specific piece.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Search. Select. Interrogate. Adjust. Draw.

Come see Hanno’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Hanno’s work:

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For LarkFor Lark. Brush and digital.

SAMMY WINTER SKATES CITE DE LA MODE, PARIS

#NOREGRETS Days – Sammy Winter skates Cité de la Mode et du Design, Paris – directed by French Fred

As the famous saying goes: live every day like it’s your last – with passion, vigour and enthusiasm. If you could spend one day living with no regrets, no reservations, no limits, what would you do?

For skater Sammy Winter, a #NOREGRETS Day is the opportunity to skate through one of Paris’ premier contemporary art institutions without crowds, so we shut down the Cité de la Mode et du Design (The City of Fashion and Design). We took legendary skate director French Fred along to capture Sammy’s day. It’s one of the most remarkable contemporary museums in Paris with its bold architecture dedicated to showcasing France’s established fashion designers alongside emerging talents – Balenciaga next to Comme des Garcons.

Sammy Winter recently turned pro for Cliché Skateboards. He is using his pro model, the “Delivery Room” in the video.

Contiki is the world leader in youth travel, with tours for 18-35s across Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Latin America & North America.

www.contiki.com/noregrets

DANIEL TING CHONG INTERVIEW

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Mag Icons

Daniel Ting Chong is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Doing a skateboard graphic has always been a “holy grail” project for me. When I was a little kid, I loved looking at the Birdhouse and Blind skateboard graphics. The colours were always saturated and clean; it really inspired me when I was younger to test out styles and linework. Since then I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic that was officially printed by a skate brand. So when I was asked by Verb to take this project on, I grabbed it with both hands.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost this amazing Ninja Turtles watch that had nunchucks for clock hands. One thing I did find worth mentioning was a stack of old Letraset packs.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I initially started with a completely different design to the one that is printed. I sketched out an idea of a boy and girl hugging each other on the edge of a mountain cliff. The pose was meant to be very dramatic with the boy holding the girl with her legs curled up behind her. The twist was that in each of their hands they had a knife pierced into each others back. Dramatic right? I liked it because it had the basic idea of lost & found, but with a dark undermining layer. On the morning of the deadline, I decided to change my design completely. I didn’t connect with the characters anymore and just didn’t like it. I then had a more graphic approach of creating intricate twists and curls out of ribbons which represent intersecting pathways. When you have a glance at it, your eye follows certain paths but gets confused by overlapping sections. You almost have to stop, look and navigate where you are again.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I really like that idea. It’s probably the most embracing thing that can happen to a design, where something totally out of your control changes your design in a organic way. Most of us nowadays design on a computer or sketch something out the way we want it to stay, but I think it is great that something created in a framed purpose can be totally broken and given a tangible path. It’s so boring when work only lives on the Internet, but now it has a chance to never be finished in a sense and always evolving.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

To reiterate some of my answers, I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic and this is my first attempt so it’s always exciting and fun. More importantly, I’m excited that my artwork will be traveling the streets, kissing curbs, rails and spinning around a lot. I think it’s probably the most fun any of my artwork will go through.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Thinking. Stressed. Creating. Re-Thinking. Happy.

Come see Daniel’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Daniel’s work:

Daniel Ting ChongStr.Crd Festival Brand Identity

Daniel Ting ChongNike AFCON Tournament

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Times Magazine

Daniel Ting ChongABSA Cityscape

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x RVCA Guitar Show

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x 2BOP

Daniel Ting ChongKidrobot Munny Custom

JACO HAASBROEK INTERVIEW

Jaco HaasbroekAcrylic & Ink on Paper. 148.5 mm x 210 mm.

Jaco Haasbroek is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I’ve always wanted to design a skateboard graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

As a kid I once picked up R20 at a fair and was really happy about it, thinking that I now had R40 to spend, only to realise that I had lost my R20.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I was thinking about the word ‘nowhere’ and how, when broken into two, it becomes ‘now’ & ‘here’. So it represents both being lost and found. I then applied this to the old saying “I’m in the middle of nowhere” which, when stated, is both a declaration of being lost, but also establishes a specific location – if that makes any sense. I then just turned the ‘H’ into a character, seeing as he is literally in the middle of nowhere.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I don’t mind. If people want to keep the artwork in tact they can hang it on a wall. It is, after all, a functional object and there’s something great about the artwork changing as it gets used.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It lends itself well to being a flat surface to print on, but also has some slight curves and this makes it sculptural. It seems to become an art object, as apposed to just another print.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Sketch. Trace. Colour. Save.

Come see Jaco’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jaco’s work:

Jaco HaasbroekPop It

Jaco HaasbroekSkating On Thin Ice

Cape Town

Jaco HaasbroekMike Stroud

Jaco HaasbroekThe i In TEAM

GERHARD HUMAN INTERVIEW

Gerhard Human Click Click Bang Bang

Gerhard Human is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Why not? Get my own personal deck AND exhibit with some rad people!

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost a Traser watch in Montagu 3 years ago. It was black and had orange bits on the numbers, in case if anyone finds it… I found R20 in my back pocket a while ago! That was great.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to do a design that you can spend time looking at; something that takes you away from the surroundings you’re used to and add a sense of adventure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Well, nothing stays beautiful forever. That’s the nature of life. Things deteriorate and from that comes new ideas. There’s a Buddhist practice of crafting an intricate mandala out of coloured sand, which takes hours, even days to complete. After it’s finished they destroy it and start all over again. It’s supposed to teach you about the impermanence of material things… I guess in that same way letting go of precious material things is therapeutic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

The exciting thing is the audience it will be exposed to. Doing a painting that hangs in a gallery is great but is often only seen by upperclass people who’re in the habit of buying art. Whereas, a skateboard will be used by people like me. People who LIVE a creative life.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Explore. Trance. Capture. Fixate. Trust.

Come see Gerhard’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Gerhard’s work:

Gerhard Human Forest

Gerhard Human Last Days of Billy The Kid

Gerhard Human Look At It

Gerhard Human Obscured by Clouds

Gerhard Human Safe From Harm

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Hong Kong’s first tattoo convention took place on 3 November 2013 at the InnoCentre in Kowloon Tong. Tattoo artists from as far as Korea and Poland took part, along with some South African tattooers who live in Hong Kong, Ross Turpin and Rich Phipson from Starcrossed Tattoo.

JADE KLARA INTERVIEW

Coral Girl - Jade Klara

Jade Klara is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. She is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with her to chat about her graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I had a board when I was 8; an old 80’s shape with a bright pink mutant rat graphic. I was in love. I have always wanted to do a skate graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I once found a 5 leaf clover, but I was very young and bad at maths so you never know. I lose my brushes all the time but I find them holding my hair up.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

When I thought of lost & found I thought of ancient treasure, of heaps of gold and rubies hiding in an undiscovered cave. I was then really intrigued by a genie’s lamp, but instead of a typical genie I wanted something more animalistic, so the wolf genie was born. I kept the scene quite dark and ghostly and then used metallic gold as a reference to lost treasure and magic.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I like that it has a lifespan. Ephemeral things are more poetic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It’s great that this canvas has a purpose. It gets to move and break and see the world.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Growl, draw, make-a-wolf-face-for-reference, draw, exhale.

Come see Jade’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jade’s work:

Nest - Jade Klara

Bind - Jade Klara

Ghost Sloth - Jade Klara

Ghost Sloth - Jade Klara

Sloth Poster - Jade Klara

Lost - Jade Klara

NEW WORK FROM SENYOL

Paul SenyolBonnie, mixed media on canson montval 300gm

Paul SenyolRobin, mixed media on canson montval 300gm

Paul SenyolWondrous Cloud, mixed media on canson montval 300gm

Paul Senyol is an abstract artist, based in Woodstock, Cape Town, South Africa.
senyol.blogspot.com

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Gareth Lloyd TattooTattoo by Gareth Lloyd

We thought we’d see what the boys at Cape Electric Tattoo have been up to lately…

Tattoo by WaldoHealed Tattoo by Waldo Del Rocca

Tattoo by David ChastonTattoo by David Chaston

David ChastonHealed Tattoo by David Chaston

David ChastonTattoo by David Chaston

WaldoTattoo by Waldo Del Rocca

Tattoo by WaldoTattoo by Waldo Del Rocca

Tattoo by WaldoTattoo by Waldo Del Rocca

Tattoo by WaldoTattoo by Waldo Del Rocca

Tattoo by Gareth LloydTattoo by Gareth Lloyd

Tattoo by WaldoTattoo by Waldo Del Rocca

Cape Electric Tattoo is located at 11 Buitensingel Street, Cape Town, Western Cape, 8001.
021 423 7646
info@capeelectrictattoo.com
www.capeelectrictattoo.com

LOST / FOUND EXHIBITION

lost found exhibition

Revolution presents:

lost / found

Verb 2013 Artist Series Range Launch
&
lost/found: an exhibition of exploration

Verb Artist Skateboard Range 2013:
Daniel Ting Chong
Gerard Human
Hanno Van Zyl
Jade Klara
Justin Southey
Jaco Haasbroek

And artists:
Paul Senyol
Simon Berndt
Jason de Villiers
Dani Loureiro
Ninja Bread Boy
Motel 7
Justin Poulter
Cassandra Johnson
Nicola De Jager
Matthew Oldfield
Candice Jezek aka Z
Chris Valentine
Michael Dos Ramos

DJ’s on vinyl from Roastin’ Records

Cash bar

Opening:
28 November 2013
7 – 10pm

Good to know:
A portion of proceeds from the evening will go to Milkshed; a not-for-profit business that uses reclaimed wood to create furniture and rebuild schools.

Revolution, The Woodstock Exchange, 66 Albert Road, Woodstock

021 447 6801

Verb | ROASTIN’ RECORDS – Cape Town | Revolution | The Kraken Rum | Milkshed

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Painting by Sam Phillips

Sam Phillips is an American tattoo artist. He owns and operated American Tattoo in Bonsall CA. He has been tattooing and painting since 2001. We think his tattoos are pretty cool, and so are his machines he made from upcycled Independent Trucks.

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Painting by Sam Phillips

Painting by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

Tattoo by Sam Phillips

JEREMY FISH 10FT BUNNY

Jeremy Fish, illustrator and artist, did this sculpture of his famous character, the ‘Silly Pink Bunny’. It was an installation that existed at the base of Haight Street, San Francisco, for years. Construction began and they removed the bunny. As a kind of response, the neighbourhood and Jeremy Fish are trying to put a 10 foot tall permanent bronze sculpture in its place, which is going to cost $50000. Watch the video above to see why Jeremy thinks that this is important.

What’s your opinion?

TATTOO TUESDAYS

U.S Army Tightens Rules on Tattoos

A new set of Army regulations, now under final review, would ban tattoos below the knee or elbow, but soldiers who already have the ink will be grandfathered in. That has set off a rush by soldiers to get work done ahead of a looming cutoff date, which Army authorities have said will most likely be 60 days after the approval of any new regulation.

Current Army uniform policy bans tattoos on the head and face, but it allows them down the arms and legs and on the hands. New recruits face the same prohibitions but also are banned from having neck tattoos. The coming regulations have irked many soldiers who would like to keep adding to their skin-art collection.

“Who’s going to see our tattoos?” asked 21-year-old Pvt. Cody Hartman, a combat engineer, who recently got a Chevrolet symbol on his left forearm and has plans to get a chain-link fence on his right. Both combat and dress uniforms have long pants and sleeves, which cover up tattoos most troops get in line with existing rules, he said, adding: “It’s not like it’s going to affect professional appearance.”

Tattoos have long been a part of military culture, but as they have become more popular, and more prominently displayed on the body, the various branches have been reining them in to try to maintain a professional look. “Tattoos and the military go hand in hand,” said Staff Sgt. Bahmandeji. A soldier without a tattoo “is like having a peanut butter and jelly sandwich without the jelly,” he said.

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Getty Images

London Tattoo Convention

Tattooed people from all over the world recently met up at the London International Tattoo Convention, the 9th one of its kind. Over 300 tattoo artists were there to show off their skills. Here are some images from the convention…

Getty Images

Conor Boyle – Getty Images

Bugz Bonniie – Getty Images

Tattoo Machines – Getty Images

Getty Images

Getty Images

Tattoo Inks – Getty Images

Getty Images

Getty Images

PAUL SENYOL INTERVIEW

Letters to Lotte – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 905mm x 635mm – framed

A Vacant Passage opens this weekend, so we caught up with artist Paul Senyol to talk to him about it…

Tell us about A Vacant Passage, your exhibition this weekend with Andrzej Urbanski.
It is a two person show, opening on Saturday at Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection. Andrzej and I met about a year and a half ago for the first time. We have since become close friends and, during this time, have discovered many similarities in our approach to work and life, as well as our past. The exhibition is an exploration along these themes.

How did you guys meet? What made you decide to work on an exhibition and collaborate on some work together?
I heard that Andrzej was at /A WORD OF ART AIR (Artist In Residence) programme, and one day I passed by him while cycling down the street. At the time he was busy painting a wall. I waved, shouted “nice wall” and carried on riding. A few days later we met again while walking down the street. We exchanged numbers, and when AJ returned a few months later, we started to hang out a bit more. We both enjoy each others’ work, and we had an idea to do some collaborative walls and art pieces. Monique at Salon91 and myself were planning exhibitions and shows for myself in January this year, and we decided to do a two person show in October. I suggested AJ as the other artist whom I most wanted to work with.

Charlotte – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 930mm x 795mm – framed

What do you think influences your personal style to be more abstract than ‘straight forward’, if I can say that?
I like to play with line and colour, and create things that are a bit more allusive and are able to draw a viewer in, as well as engage with a person as they start to make sense of a piece and interpret it for themselves. I believe that in painting there needs to be a fair bit of interpretation allowed on the viewers behalf. I like to engage with the viewer’s imagination.

The press release for the exhibition mentioned that “To the artists, Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa too might become a vacant place.” What is a ‘vacant’ place?
Through our time researching and creating works for the exhibition, we came across so many old photos of places, people and things that no longer exist but, if you showed one of these photos to my Dad for instance, it would bring back a memory of something that perhaps no longer exists. As people, we travel to and from places, leave things behind, take things with us, make friends etc., but at the end of the day, we cannot take a place with us. In essence, the place becomes vacant when we leave, but it remains in our minds and in our hearts. Germany and Poland became vacant for our families because, for various reasons, they were forced to move. It has been fascinating to me exploring these places via photos, letters and diaries from my grandparents.

Pretoria Castle – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 485mm x 460mm – framed

What made you decide to integrate computer software and technologies into the exhibition? How has it been integrated?
A friend of Monique’s, Johan, approached us with this concept of showing work in a new way, via digital means. What excited AJ and myself was that it would allow us to show work in a physical space, but bring the viewer into contact with all the history and source we had used in a non-tangible digital space. We are now able to elaborate on these ‘vacant passages’ through which our families and ourselves have travelled.

What do you hope that people get out of viewing the exhibition?
I hope people are inspired by the works we have created, and that they realise that each day they have the opportunity to continue writing a history story of their own; that through the exhibition they realise the importance of friendships and family. These archived photos, letters and documents from my grandparents are fascinating for their history, but also how they shape my identity and sense of place in this world. We all leave a legacy of some form, and I hope that people are inspired to leave behind a positive trace of themselves as they travel through their lifetime.

What does the future have in store for Paul Senyol?
A few more art shows locally this year and a short residency in Germany halfway through 2014. After the opening on Saturday I would like to take a few days off to plot some ideas for upcoming shows and projects.

Any last words?
The show opens on Saturday at 11h00. We will have some sweet ice cream, as well as be making a braai. Come on down and say hi, hang out, and enjoy the opening with us.

A Vacant Passage Invite from Monique du Preez on Vimeo.

A VACANT PASSAGE EXHIBITION

A Vacant Passage Introduction from Digital Narrative on Vimeo.

A two-person exhibition by Paul Senyol & Andrzej Urbanski presented by Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection

There is a beautiful synergy that exists between Paul Senyol & Andrzej Urbanski’s paintings. A VACANT PASSAGE is the story of two artists traveling and leaving behind remnants and legacies, told and expressed through powerful & uniquely abstracted artworks. Andrzej Urbanski [Pol/Ger] and Paul Senyol [Zar] first met during Urbanski’s residency in Cape Town in June of 2012. Soon they began to discover the many similarities, which exist across their individual artistic practices and approaches, even though the execution of their work differs radically.

A VACANT PASSAGE presents an all-new body of work from Urbanski and Senyol respectively, as well as some collaborative pieces, all of which relate to their history and the common happenings of the years when both artists’ families experienced the repercussions of The Second World War. The works on exhibition reference a time and a place, which no longer exist. Both artists having experienced this particular location in a different context, come together to seek out and construct a narrative from the puzzle pieces of a past, which neither has any actual recollection of, other than a shoebox filled with photos, newspaper clippings, essays as well as stories handed down from generation to generation. To the artists, Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa too might become a vacant place.

While the subject matter may seem very specific, the works carry a truly universal message. The exhibition will feature a unique AUGMENTED REALITY aspect, which will further enhance the level of accessibility, as well as the viewer’s experience of the exhibition by means of user-friendly computer software & technologies. Visitors will be able to download the software to devices such as Smartphones & Ipads to enjoy an enhanced experience, which will offer further insight into the artists, their stories and the works on show. The exhibition flyer, the shopfront and the artworks will be layered with interactive digital content. Viewers can expect to see medium to large-scale paintings varying from monochrome black and white, to beautiful hues of colour on paper and on canvas, as well as a number of collaborative works.

ANDRZEJ URBANSKI | ARTISTS PROFILE

Andrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski (Born 1983) is a German visual artist of Polish ancestry, currently residing in Cape Town. Andrzej’s early artistic background has developed and evolved over the course of 16 years spent painting, creating sculptures, being involved in several art projects, exhibitions and teaching positions around the globe. The artist holds a Masters Degree in Fine Arts, attained during 2012 from the EAE (European Art Ensemble) at the ECAL (University of Art & Design) in Lausanne, Switzerland and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Design/Graphic Design from BTK-FH in Berlin since 2010. In June of 2012 Andrzej completed a residency at /A WORD OF ART as a part of his studies. The mandate for the EAE program states that students must engage in dialogue with foreign scholars and institutions, holding at its core the need for interpersonal connection and foreign travel to gather experience and exchange ideas between art professionals, educators, and students. Aside from his finished thesis research, Andrzej is interested in exploring the process of creating work in different social environments around the globe, drawing influence and inspiration from architecture, landscape, photography, design elements and media/advertising & of course from the other artists he encounters on his journey. His main artistic focus is on human social behaviour and learned or innate reactions to varying shapes and colours.

PAUL SENYOL | ARTISTS PROFILE

Paul Senyol

Paul Senyol was born on the 25th of October 1980 in Cape Town, South Africa. Paul has been drawing and painting since his early high school years, however never pursuing any form of artistic or graphic training. At age sixteen, he discovered the freedom of skateboarding and punk rock music in the beautiful suburb of Welgemoed, where he grew up. This naturally became a key influence in his early drawings, sketches and paintings, while skateboard graphics, album covers, magazine layouts and illustrations played a role in developing his aesthetic eye. Around the same time, he also became exposed to the creativity of graffiti and street artists such as Marc Gonzales, Ed Templeton, and Barry McGee – all of this forming part of his early art education. A few years later Paul was introduced to and moved by the creative thought and artistic genius of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol, and Cy Twombly respectively. Senyol’s lack of formal training and schooling has given him the freedom to break away from traditional notions of painting, to explore genres and styles, and to meld mediums, allowing him a creative freedom that flows so evidently through his work. Senyol’s art lingers gracefully and intentionally between beauty and honesty and brings a surreal, yet abstract world into being. His current work focuses heavily on narrative, shape, line, form, composition, colour & texture. Each faint line, bold brushstroke and shape is carefully composed to breathe life into its environment, reflecting something of light, serenity, experience and thought. His finished work seeks to engage the viewer through translating his own experiences to canvas, allowing an open discussion and translation of his work. Senyol has exhibited extensively throughout South Africa and abroad. This year Paul has been nominated as a finalist to the Absa Atelier Competition 2013. He currently works from a studio in Woodstock, Cape Town.

Paul Senyol A Boy's DreamPaul Senyol – A Boy’s Dream

Andrzej Urbanski ArtAndrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski ArtAndrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski ArtAndrzej Urbanski

Paul Senyol GretschensheimPaul Senyol – Gretschensheim

Paul Senyol To FinlandiaPaul Senyol – To Finlandia

Opening Event: Daytime Opening, Saturday 21 Sept from 11h00 till late! Show concludes 12 Oct at 14h00.

THE WITCHING HOUR EXHIBITION

Candice JežekCandice Ježek. Caught a Glimpse. Acrylic on Fabriano.

THE WITCHING HOUR

Jade Klara & Candice Ježek [aka Ž]

16 October – 9 November 2013

WEDNESDAY EVENING 16 October 2013 at 18h30

The Witching Hour is an exploration of the magical and secret spaces of the world. Artists Candice Ježek and Jade Klara use a whimsical and powerfully feminine style to create rich narratives of unexpected yet somehow familiar themes. Expressed through various mediums of painting, sculpture, and print, they aim to move the viewer to a place of both sweetness and sorrow. The witching hour is a visually stimulating, diverse and powerful showing of the reflections of these two artists’ lives.

Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection

Opening Event: Evening Opening 16 October at 18h30pm.

The show will conclude 9 November at 14h00.

Facebook event link: www.facebook.com/events/192687710912514/

Gallery Hours: Tue – Fri: 10 am – 6pm; Sat: 10am – 2pm; Closed: Mondays & Sundays
Address: 91 Kloof Street, Cape Town
Email: info@salon91.co.za
Contact Numbers: 021-424-6930 / 082-679-3906
Website: www.salon91.co.za
For further information & high res / more images of the artworks please contact the gallery director & curator, Monique at info@salon91.co.za / salon91.art@gmail.com

Candice JežekCandice Ježek. When You Find It Hold It Near. Acrylic on Fabriano.

Jade KlaraJade Klara. Coral Girl

Jade KlaraJade Klara. Wolf Heart

Jade and CandiceJade Klara and Candice Ježek

RED BULL CURATES CANVAS COOLER

Red Bull curated Canvas Cooler

13 September 2013 6:00 PM, 61 Harrington Street. Cape Town

Celebrating some of the most innovative contemporary artists in Cape Town as they turn their eye-catching designs into canvas-wrapped Red Bull coolers. The work will be showcased at The Assembly on Friday September 13, 2013 from 6pm.

Artists participating:

Screen-shot-2013-09-13-at-9.37.02-AMScreen-shot-2013-09-13-at-9.38.08-AMScreen-shot-2013-09-13-at-9.38.26-AMScreen-shot-2013-09-13-at-9.38.44-AM

Read more about the event and RSVP here: http://www.redbull.com/za/en/events/1331609592428/red-bull-curates-canvas-cooler

FORMER MOUNTAINS EXHIBITION

Former Mountains Group Exhibition proudly presented by Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection

28 August – 19 September 2013

Bruce MackayBruce Mackay. Ash Cloud #1 – Eclipse. Pen & Ink on Paper. 510 x 370mm (Framed artwork size).

About Former Mountains:

‘Former Mountains’, a group show by Bruce Mackay, Dale Lawrence, Jean de Wet & Mike Tymbios is currently on view at Salon91 in Cape Town. The artists have been selected to exhibit together based on a strong narrative quality, which is common to their individual practices, as well as for a unique & highly individualistic quality of line which is both present & signature to each of their styles. The result is a sleek & sophisticated display of drawing and print, which seamlessly combines bold expression, abstraction and moments of extremely fine as well as graphic detail, all expressed through a limited palette of red, blues and black. Each exhibiting artist has indeed taken a truly unique approach to the treatment of the subject of ‘Former Mountains’ from singular to composite multifaceted interpretations, ranging from the very literal to far-off poetic and obscure expressions…

Dale LawrenceDale Lawrence. Object to Inspire Awe. Edition of 5, plus artist proof. Linocut on Zerkall paper. 645 x 860mm (Framed artwork size); 555 x 765mm (Unframed artwork size).

Jean de WetJean de Wet. Quarry Cove. Pen on Hahnemuhle. 435 x 610mm (Framed artwork size).

Michael TymbiosMichael Tymbios. Harry. Gouache on Hahnemuhle bamboo paper 250 gsm. 805 x 1150mm (Framed artwork size).

Find out more from the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/442921912481359/

R1 – STREET ARTIST

color wheel medium: plastic bottle tops (England)

r1. is an active street artist based in Johannesburg, South Africa.

He/she has been most active in the last 7 years, working extensively with several street art projects in different cities and continents. r1.’s work covers various media, including installations, sculptures and wall art (paste ups). In his/her interventions and sculptures, he/she often works with found materials, transforming them and giving them back to the city, as modified artistic contributions. r1. has lived in England and South Africa in recent years, where he/she has done most of his/her work. His/her work crosses cultural barriers between England and Africa and creates a dialogue between continents. r1. has also traveled in Europe and left some work behind in Germany, Spain and France.

city cage medium: barrier tape (South Africa)

lego tin medium: metal tins (England)

bookshop medium: magazine paper (England)

blood box medium: paint (England)

busy line medium: paint (England)

under cover medium: leaves (England)

disconnected medium: electric wire (England)

disconnected medium: electric wire (England)

tube vision medium: barrier tape (South Africa)

chop chop (England)

http://r1r1r1.net/interventions

KALASHNIKOVV GALLERY INTERVIEW

Kalashnikovv Gallery

The Kalashnikovv Gallery is a contemporary South African and international fine art gallery, project space and consultancy, located in Johannesburg. We chat to Murray Turpin, who founded the gallery with Matthew Dean.

The Kalashnikovv Gallery opened in January this year. Why did you decide to open an art gallery?

We decided to open the gallery for various reasons: 1. From a developmental strategy of our satellite gallery concept into a more permanent manifestation. 2. From the lack of galleries showing work we could relate too both aesthetically and theoretically. 3. A lack of galleries I could relate to as an artist as well.

Photo by Matthew Dean

What does the name mean?

Simply put, the name represents a metaphor of sorts for revolution within the white cube construct that most galleries in South Africa adhere to and we hope to a degree to re-articulate and expand upon.

Is there a reason why you located yourself in Joburg? Is the art scene there better than other areas of South Africa? Do people just appreciate art more there?

It’s my home and home is where the art is a.k.a. for now, simple logistics and ease of access to my networks.

Tell us about what’s happening at the moment.

At the moment we have a photographic show by Reshma Chhiba up entitled “The Two Talking Yonis”. To come, we have a concept multimedia show by I Create,We Create entitled “May Johannesburg Bless You”.

Photo by Mooki Mooks. Helmet by Veronika. The Riot Exhibition.

Where do you think South Africa is situated in the global art world? Do you have any comments on the art community in South Africa?

In my opinion, on a rapid upward spiral and as for comments on the community at large… not really. I’m focused on my own practice and gallery as they should be on theirs, for now.

Do you still skate at all? Was skateboarding influential to you in any way?

I don’t really skate anymore. I roll around from time to time though. Skateboarding played a massive roll in my early exploration of art and graphics, from (Ed) Templeton to The Gonz to Stef (Steak) Naudé to Alien Workshop and back again. My first artist feature ever was in Session Magazine back in the day. Shout outs to Stef Naudé and Brendan Body!

Do you create any of your own art?

Yes, I do.

Photo by Matthew Dean

What is art?

Not giving a fuck.

Who are some of your favorite South African artists?

Conrad Botes, Marcel Marcel, Conrad Botha, Athi Patra Ruga, and many more. Those were just the first to come to mind.

What can we expect to see in the gallery in the future?

Only the future knows.

Photo by Marcel Marcel

facebook.com/pages/Kalashnikovv-Gallery/
twitter.com/KalashGallery
kalashnikovvgallery.tumblr.com/

TATTOO TUESDAYS

We think that Polish tattoo artist Marcin Aleksander’s work is amazing. Incredible colour in neo-traditional style. Enjoy…

STRANGE NEW FEELINGS: A FILM ABOUT ED TEMPLETON

Strange New Feelings is a documentary that will examine the life of artist and skateboard legend Ed Templeton as he navigates a blossoming art career and a transition from professional skateboarding. The film features interviews with art world contemporaries, fellow professional skateboarders and family members as Ed travels around the world to share his unique perspective on youth and age, religion and sex, beauty and disfigurement.

The film will feature:

CR Stecyk lll
Jim Goldberg
Thomas Campbell
Chris Johanson
Tobin Yelland
Brenden Fowler
Cheryl Dunn
Leo Romero
Deanna Templeton

If you want, you can help fund the film on Kickstarter.

PAPER TRAIL ANIMATION

Really cool short animation by Joe Pease.

An experimental piece to try new techniques and have a play around with animation. I drew roughly 800 pictures then shot photos of each frame, finishing up in After Effects. Skateboarders featured: Kyle Leeper and Jake Johnson. Thanks to John Rattray for the exquisite acting.

WALL THERAPY 2013 VIDEO

The Wall Therapy festival took place between July 18th and July 28th 2013 in Rochester, New York. 32 artists representing 11 different countries were present at the festival, including our very own Faith47, DALeast and Freddy Sam.

FREDDY SAM AT LIVING WALLS

Photo by Jaime Rojo

Some more updates from Freddy Sam at Living Walls 2013.

Photo by Jaime Rojo

Photos courtesy of Austinmcmanus.com

Photos courtesy of Austinmcmanus.com

Photos courtesy of Austinmcmanus.com

Freddy Sam’s finished piece is tribute to Nelson Mandela and the philosophy of UBUNTU. The animals in the field are springbok. Photo by Jaime Rojo.

Living Walls, The City Speaks, is an annual conference on street art and urbanism that began in August 2010 in the city of Atlanta. Along with changing the urban landscape, the Living Walls conference set out to highlight a number of problems facing the city. Living Walls did not just showcase art, but also built a platform for much-needed dialogue in the city.

The #LW2013 conference will feature 20 dynamic artists from around the world who will produce 20 murals across Atlanta.

The five-day conference is scheduled to capacity with film screenings, lectures, block parties, gallery exhibits and bike tours. All events are free and open to the public.

Find out more: http://livingwallsatl.com

FAITH 47 AND DAL EAST AT NUART 2013

The Nuart international-in-scope street public art festival takes place every year. This year it’s happening in Stavanger, Norway. This year’s line up features our own local artists Dal East and Faith47.

From Nuart:

It gives us great pleasure to announce this years Nuart Festival line up, our most international list of artists yet. 16 artists from 11 countries spanning 4 continents are set to descend on Stavanger, a small town on the West Coast of Norway. Most of the names you will have probably already heard of. From the legendary MARTHA COOPER (US), invited as an artist in her own right and good friend AIKO (JP), enjoying a hugely successful post Faile career, to previous Nuart guests such as DAVID CHOE (US), ROA (BE), VHILS (PT) and M-CITY (PL). First time visitors to the festival include some of the worlds hottest names, artists who over the past couple of years have made a huge impact on the development of street art and who have successfully transitioned from street to gallery and contemporary art museums. South Africa’s FAITH47 and partner in crime DAL EAST (CN) will be joined by Lithuanian born, Malaysian based ERNEST ZACHAREVIC, who’s groundbreaking interactive mural work last year on the streets of Penang took the internet by storm. The UK’s HUSH continues the Asian link, though in form rather than geography, whilst Parisian based stencil artist c215, already represented on the streets of Oslo, makes a long overdue visit to the west coast. Our very own DOTMASTER (UK), known as much for his production and sometimes curation of Nuart, also makes a welcome return as an artist in his own right. 2013 also sees Nuart delving further into Norway’s scene and history with emerging international stencil artists MARTIN WHATSON, Berlin based STRØK (who graces our posters and profile this year) and DOT DOT DOT, all names we’re sure you’ll be hearing more of over the coming months and years, if not already.

http://www.nuartfestival.no/home

LOOK EXHIBITION

New and older works by Black Koki, Ello Xray, Jean de Wet, John Second, Justin Southey, Lorcan White, Linsey Levendal, Michael Saal, Michael Tymbios, Nagkakao, Paul Senyol, Rooiwolf.

Acoustic set by Black Lung.

Thursday 22 August
18:00 – 22:00
“Side Street Studios”
32 William street Woodstock

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/events/485331711557535/

FREDDY SAM AT LIVING WALLS

South African artist, Freddy Sam, is participating in this year’s Living Walls Conference, which started yesterday.

An example of Freddy Sam’s previous work:

Living Walls, The City Speaks, is an annual conference on street art and urbanism that began in August 2010 in the city of Atlanta. Along with changing the urban landscape, the Living Walls conference set out to highlight a number of problems facing the city. Living Walls did not just showcase art, but also built a platform for much-needed dialogue in the city.

The #LW2013 conference will feature 20 dynamic artists from around the world who will produce 20 murals across Atlanta.

The five-day conference is scheduled to capacity with film screenings, lectures, block parties, gallery exhibits and bike tours. All events are free and open to the public.

Find out more: http://livingwallsatl.com

FORMER MOUNTAINS EXHIBITION

Bruce MackayBruce Mackay – Crown 1

A group show by Bruce Mackay, Dale Lawrence, Jean de Wet and Mike Tymbios, presented by Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection.

28 August – 18 September 2013

Former Mountains‘ is an exhibition, which is predominantly centered around the art and medium of drawing and to some extent print. The artists have been selected to exhibit together based on a strong narrative quality, which is common to their individual practices, as well as for a unique & highly individualistic quality of line which is both present and signature to each of their styles. The artists have each taken a unique approach to the subject of ‘Former Mountains‘, some presenting a number of diverse interpretations of the theme which will be depicted as smaller individual series within their greater body of work, while the other exhibiting artists have taken a more singular approach, ranging from the very literal to far-off poetic and obscure expressions.

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/events/442921912481359/

D Lawrence Object to Inspire AweDale Lawrence – Object to Inspire

Jean De Wet ApartmentJean de Wet – Apartment

Michael Tymbios Ghost Mountain PassMichael Tymbios – Ghost Mountain Pass

NEW MURAL BY FREDDY SAM IN PHILADELPHIA

South African artist Freddy Sam has been working with the City of Philadelphia Arts Program and students from Sayre High School. He painted this mural called Together Moving Mountains in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Nice one Freddy!

Photos via RJ Rushmore

THE WORKING ARTISANS’ CLUB: LOVENSKATE

Huck magazine is doing a series called The Working Artisan’s Club, focusing on the craftsmen and women who choose to live life as an artisan. In this episode they focus on Stu Smith from Lovenskate, owner of The Mangle Studio. Stu screen prints and crafts beautiful hand-printed boards.

Documented in print, film and through beautiful photography, The Working Artisan’s Club will live online and in print, culminating in a week-long exhibition that opens at 71a Leonard Street, London, September 2013.

A VACANT PASSAGE EXHIBITION

Paul Senyol

Artists Paul Senyol and Andrzej Urbanski have an upcoming exhibition called ‘A Vacant Passage’ at Salon91 in Cape Town.

The past is often a source of inspiration within working practice amongst artists, but how about when two artists meet by chance and share a common heritage and history? Andrzej Urbanski(Pol/Ger) and Paul Senyol first met in Cape Town, during Urbanski’s three month residency early in 2012. There was an immediate connection between the two, and upon Urbanski’s return later in 2012 they began spending more time together exchanging ideas, thoughts and concepts. They quickly began to discover many similarities within their artistic practice and approaches, even though their execution differed greatly. A common visual language, yet different dialects. Up until that time each artist had been writing their own story, looking back, but also looking forward. Uncovering their past they found similar backgrounds, heritage, influences, and commonalities between their families. Both families having lived within a 200km radius of one other. Much of their lives changed at the beginning of the second world war when both families were forced to give up their homeland and way of life. Common roots yet a shared experience of displacement and loss. A vacant passage. For the exhibition the artists reference back to a time and place which no longer exists, both artists having experienced this space and place, and now coming together to seek out and make a story of a puzzle and a past which neither has any recollection of, besides a shoebox of photos, newspaper clippings, essays as well as stories handed down from generation to generation.

To the artists’ Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa might become a vacant place. The story of two artists traveling and leaving behind remnants and legacies. The artists will each produce a body of new works related to their history and the common happenings of the years when both artists’ families experienced the difficulties and repercussions of the 2nd World War.

For the exhibition the artists will also collaborate on several artworks as well as a mural within the gallery.

Andrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski

FABIANO RODRIGUES SELF PORTRAITS

Fabiano Rodrigues is a Sao Paulo, Brazil – based photographer and ex-professional skateboarder. These photos are part of a series of self-portraits of himself skateboarding in architecturally beautiful locations, captured through a Hasselblad camera by remote control. The photos are all once-off prints, exploring the history and repertoire of skateboarding movements, particularly its relationship with the city, its architecture and urban furniture. In his choices of locations, there is a special interest for architectural landmarks, such as buildings designed by the renowned Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer. Fabiano is represented by the LOGO gallery in Sau Paulo, Brazil.

TATTOO TUESDAYS

The legendary Bowery tattooist Charlie Wagner tattooing an unknown woman. Credit: Don and Newly Preziosi Collection

Margot Mifflin recently wrote a book called Bodies of Subversion; A Secret History of Women and Tattoo. These are some of our favourite images.

Those who would shame women with tattoos often utter things like: How are those things going to look when you’re old and wrinkled? On the basis of the photographs of older women with tattoos in this book, I’d say they hold up pretty well. In fact, I’d say they look sort of awesome.

Betty Broadbent, in the 1920s. Credit: Circus World Museum, Baraboo, Wisconsin

Cindy Ray, in 1962. Credit: Randy Johnson

The tattooist Irene “Bobbie” Libarry, in 1976. Credit: Imogen Cunningham Trust

Tattoo by Saira Hunjan

For most of history, tattooing has been a male preoccupation, either a one-fingered salute or an exercise in swagger. Think of Popeye and his twin anchors. Ms. Mifflin had the good idea to examine tattooing in the Western world from a female perspective. Her relatively slim book doesn’t provide a truly wide-angle view, but the insights she brings are insinuating and complex.

If you would like to read about the book, click here.

WALL THERAPY 2013

DALeastDALeast. Photo courtesy of theflopbox.com

Some more updates from DALeast who is currently at Wall Therapy 2013 in Rochester, New York, alongside Faith47 and Freddy Sam.

DALeastDALeast. Photo courtesy of theflopbox.com

DALeastDALeast. Photo courtesy of theflopbox.com

More about Wall Therapy:

WALLTHERAPY [wawl.ther-uh-pee]-noun- a public community-level intervention using mural art as a vehicle to address our collective need for inspiration.

Images heal cities.
Dr. Ian Wilson wanted to give back to Rochester, the city that has given him so much. In 2012, the manifestation of that thank you became WALLTHERAPY, a community level intervention using mural art as a vehicle to address our collective need for inspiration. During this week-long festival, 11 street artists (“therapists”) from across the globe painted (“rehabilitated”) 16 walls, healing the city with new life and energy. The intervention beautified our urban landscape, ignited a community dialogue and inspired Rochesterians to view the Image City, a moniker originally attributed to Kodak, in a proud, new way.

Images save lives.
While WALLTHERAPY heals cities through art, its sister initiative, IMPACT! (IMProving Access to Care by Teleradiology), does its healing by setting up diagnostic imaging sites in developing countries. The connection between art and the medical philanthropy is imagery. Street murals enhance life. Medical X-ray imagery preserves it. Both entities are housed under the Synthesis Collaborative, a 501(c)(3) public charity incorporated in New York State. The organization raises funds to set up teleradiology services within these developing communities and grow a network of volunteer radiologists around the world. These doctors use cloud computing to access images, interpret them and recommend treatment. As a result, afflictions that are commonly misdiagnosed, or missed entirely, are properly diagnosed, saving countless lives. Artists travel to these communities as well, improving life with inspirational murals.

The walls are our vehicle for inspiring and rehabilitating our community. We are intervening visually to address a fundamental collective need of our citizenry, the need for inspiration. In addition and quite literally, the walls on which our “therapists” will paint are being resurfaced and rehabilitated…given new life and energy.

Our inaugural project which took place during July 2011 was entitled “Visual Intervention.” Therefore, this year’s project will officially be known as “WALLTHERAPY… the second movement of Visual Intervention”

http://wall-therapy.com/

EVERYBODY STREET TRAILER

The upcoming documentary, Everybody Street, looks really cool. It is a collection of interviews and photos from some of the world’s most famous street photographers. Some are inspiring and interesting, others are dark and depressing. But all of them are real life. Featuring photographers like Jill Freedman, Bruce Gilden, Mary Ellen Mark, Jeff Mermelstein, Clayton Patterson, Ricky Powell, Martha Cooper and more.

Everybody Street “pays tribute to the spirit of street photography through a cinematic exploration of New York City, and captures the visceral rush, singular perseverance and at times immediate danger customary to these artists.”

Warning; Some of the images in the video probably aren’t suitable for sensitive viewers.

WALL THERAPY 2013

Freddy SamFreddy Sam. Photo courtesy of theflopbox.com.

Some more updates from Freddy Sam, DALeast and Faith47 at Wall Therapy 2013 in Rochester, New York.

Freddy SamFreddy Sam. Photo courtesy of theflopbox.com.

Faith47Faith47. Photo courtesy of theflopbox.com.

Faith47Faith47. Photo courtesy of Lisa Barker.

DALeastDALeast. Photo courtesy of Josh Saunders.

DALeastDALeast. Photo courtesy of Jason Wilder.

DALeastDALeast. Photo courtesy of Wall Therapy.

More about Wall Therapy:

WALLTHERAPY [wawl.ther-uh-pee]-noun- a public community-level intervention using mural art as a vehicle to address our collective need for inspiration.

Images heal cities.
Dr. Ian Wilson wanted to give back to Rochester, the city that has given him so much. In 2012, the manifestation of that thank you became WALLTHERAPY, a community level intervention using mural art as a vehicle to address our collective need for inspiration. During this week-long festival, 11 street artists (“therapists”) from across the globe painted (“rehabilitated”) 16 walls, healing the city with new life and energy. The intervention beautified our urban landscape, ignited a community dialogue and inspired Rochesterians to view the Image City, a moniker originally attributed to Kodak, in a proud, new way.

Images save lives.
While WALLTHERAPY heals cities through art, its sister initiative, IMPACT! (IMProving Access to Care by Teleradiology), does its healing by setting up diagnostic imaging sites in developing countries. The connection between art and the medical philanthropy is imagery. Street murals enhance life. Medical X-ray imagery preserves it. Both entities are housed under the Synthesis Collaborative, a 501(c)(3) public charity incorporated in New York State. The organization raises funds to set up teleradiology services within these developing communities and grow a network of volunteer radiologists around the world. These doctors use cloud computing to access images, interpret them and recommend treatment. As a result, afflictions that are commonly misdiagnosed, or missed entirely, are properly diagnosed, saving countless lives. Artists travel to these communities as well, improving life with inspirational murals.

The walls are our vehicle for inspiring and rehabilitating our community. We are intervening visually to address a fundamental collective need of our citizenry, the need for inspiration. In addition and quite literally, the walls on which our “therapists” will paint are being resurfaced and rehabilitated…given new life and energy.

Our inaugural project which took place during July 2011 was entitled “Visual Intervention.” Therefore, this year’s project will officially be known as “WALLTHERAPY… the second movement of Visual Intervention”

http://wall-therapy.com/

WALL THERAPY 2013

Faith 47 Wall Therapy 2013 Photo by Jason WilderFaith 47’s Progress. Photo courtesy of Jason Wilder.

Wall Therapy 2013 has kicked off, and our very own Faith47, Freddy Sam and DALeast are owning it there. Here are some updates from DALeast and Freddy Sam. Hopefully there will be some updates from Faith47 soon as well.

Freddy Sam’s Progress:

Freddy Sam Wall Therapy 2013Photo courtesy of Jason Wilder.

Freddy Sam Wall Therapy 2013Photo courtesy of Jason Wilder.

Freddy Sam Wall Therapy 2013Photo courtesy of blog.vandalog.com

DALeast’s Progress:

DALeast Wall Therapy 2013 Photo courtesy of www.theflopbox.com

DALeast Wall Therapy 2013 Photo courtesy of www.theflopbox.com

More about Wall Therapy:

WALLTHERAPY [wawl.ther-uh-pee]-noun- a public community-level intervention using mural art as a vehicle to address our collective need for inspiration.

Images heal cities.
Dr. Ian Wilson wanted to give back to Rochester, the city that has given him so much. In 2012, the manifestation of that thank you became WALLTHERAPY, a community level intervention using mural art as a vehicle to address our collective need for inspiration. During this week-long festival, 11 street artists (“therapists”) from across the globe painted (“rehabilitated”) 16 walls, healing the city with new life and energy. The intervention beautified our urban landscape, ignited a community dialogue and inspired Rochesterians to view the Image City, a moniker originally attributed to Kodak, in a proud, new way.

Images save lives.
While WALLTHERAPY heals cities through art, its sister initiative, IMPACT! (IMProving Access to Care by Teleradiology), does its healing by setting up diagnostic imaging sites in developing countries. The connection between art and the medical philanthropy is imagery. Street murals enhance life. Medical X-ray imagery preserves it. Both entities are housed under the Synthesis Collaborative, a 501(c)(3) public charity incorporated in New York State. The organization raises funds to set up teleradiology services within these developing communities and grow a network of volunteer radiologists around the world. These doctors use cloud computing to access images, interpret them and recommend treatment. As a result, afflictions that are commonly misdiagnosed, or missed entirely, are properly diagnosed, saving countless lives. Artists travel to these communities as well, improving life with inspirational murals.

The walls are our vehicle for inspiring and rehabilitating our community. We are intervening visually to address a fundamental collective need of our citizenry, the need for inspiration. In addition and quite literally, the walls on which our “therapists” will paint are being resurfaced and rehabilitated…given new life and energy.

Our inaugural project which took place during July 2011 was entitled “Visual Intervention.” Therefore, this year’s project will officially be known as “WALLTHERAPY… the second movement of Visual Intervention”

http://wall-therapy.com/

THE EDITIONS SHOW OPENING PHOTOS

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We went to the opening of The Editions Show at the Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection, 91 Kloof Street, Cape Town, last night. These are some snapshots from the opening, but they really don’t do the exhibition justice. You actually need to go there and look at the artworks yourself to fully appreciate just how good they are. We were blown away by the skill and quality of most of the work, and would highly recommend that, if you’re in Cape Town, you get your butt down there and spend some time there browsing the art. The exhibition is open until the 24th of August.

Featured artists:
Adrie Le Roux, Alice Edy, Andrew Sutherland, Annika de Korte, Ben Winfield, Bruce Mackay, Carmen Ziervogel, Caroline Mackintosh, Cassandra Leigh Johnson, Charles Haupt, Claudette Maskell, Clement de Bruin, Cynthia Edwards, Dani Loureiro, Donna Solovei, Dylan Culhane, Fred Clarke, Galia Gluckman, Gerhard Human, Hanno van Zyl, Hugh Byrne, Jade Klara, Jason de Villiers, Jay Gordon, Jono Dry, Jop Kunneke, Kirsten Sims, Louis Minnaar, Marchand, Mareliza Nel, Mieke van der Merwe, Neill Wright, Otto du Plessis, Sarah Pratt, Simon Berndt, Sinead Turnham, Ulrich Knoblauch & Zelda Weber.

Here’s a link to the Facebook event for more info: http://www.facebook.com/events/258235247635079/

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#WHILEYOUWEREHUSTLING EXHIBITION

#whileyouwerehustling is an exhibition by Bryan Little and Conn Bertish. These are some photos by Lúcia Pinto of the opening night.

Exploring themes of evolution, gentrification, obsessive quests, misfits and outsiders. A process orientated body of work that seeks to unravel notions of progress. Where do we take our guidance from, and where are we going?

The exhibition opened on Thursday 18 July, and is currently showing at /A WORD OF ART gallery in the Woodstock Exchange, Cape Town.

To find out more, visit the Facebook event here: http://www.facebook.com/events/171696109675503/

TATTOO TUESDAYS

Hand-poked Tattoo By Irish James

For today’s Tattoo Tuesdays, we feature Irish James, a tattooer from Sins of Style in Cape Town. Whilst competent creating regular, electric pieces, he specializes in “hand-poked” tattoos. When asked how they differ from traditional tattoos done with a machine, he says “It’s the uniqueness of each piece for sure. Well, every tattoo whether it be electric or hand-poked is unique, but it’s the rudimentary, homespun finish of the hand-poked tattoo that gives each piece so much personality. There’s definitely something captivating about that tell-tale stippled finish. It might not be for everyone, but hey, sooner regret the things you haven’t done in life rather than those you have.

Far from the “prison” tattoo stereotype, Irish James’ hand-poked tattoos are mind-blowingly neat and are certainly richly finished. This is some of his most recent work.

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Hand poked tattoo by Irish James

Sins of Style is Tyler B. Murphy, Lee Herbert, Warren Petersen and Irish James, and is located at 22 Hope Street, Gardens, Cape Town.

THE REVENGE OF THE BEASTS SHORT FILM

The Revenge of the Beasts short film by Sebastian Linda. It’s nice to see a short film made where the subjects in the film can actually skate, and the videographer understands skateboarding. Enjoy.

When I was a kid I saw a skater jumping for the first time, I believed it was magic that made him fly. I realized that this has been a childish fantasy. But this year we decided to bring back my dream.

No tripods or dollies used. Just a skateboard, car, and body movement. Filmed on the weekend of the 29 and 30th June 2013.

TATTOO TUESDAYS

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Bangkok Photographer Cedric Arnold, recently did a series called “Sacred Ink”. Enjoy the photos.

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A body, used as a canvas, every inch of skin filled with sacred text and figures of mythical creatures, all forming a protective shield. A boxer, a monk, a construction worker, a police man, a soldier, a taxi driver, a shipyard worker, a shaman, a tattoo master; men, women and their inked protection from evil spirits and bad luck. Enter the world of Thailand’s spiritual “yantra” tattoo tradition.

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For centuries, Thai men have covered their bodies with protective tattoos. Old temple murals show epic scenes of swords breaking apart when hitting a tattooed soldier’s skin. The tradition has been handed down generations of both monks and laymen who create the tattoos and empower them with special prayers.

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The ink (believed to be a secret combination of Chinese ink, snake venom, potent herbs, and ash) is applied with repeated fast jabs of the needle, which is about 40cm long ad has a tip resembling that of a fountain pen.

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GONZ EXHIBITION

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If you’re in Joburg, get down to Area3 for the Gonz exhibition.

It opened on Saturday and runs until 31 July.

JERRY HSU PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION

Jerry Hsu is opening a photography exhibition at the Family Bookstore on Fairfax, Los Angeles. The show is called The Observable Universe. These are a few sneak peaks.

RAYMOND PETTIBON’S WORK FOR BLACK FLAG

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If you are a skateboarder, listen to punk, or just a human being who keeps their eyes open, you will have heard of Black Flag. If you have heard of Black Flag, you will probably have seen some of their infamous show flyers, which will most likely have been done by Raymond Pettibon. He has also done a lot of work for Sonic Youth, another band you should have heard of. Even if you haven’t seen a copy of his original artwork, it is highly likely that you’ve seen a rip-off of it somewhere.

Raymond Pettibon has arguably produced some of the most controversial music artwork ever. His work has a really dark, anarchic feel to them, and are basically guaranteed to make your parents worry. It is quite simple in the way that it is usually just black on white paper, not far off from the original sketches, but the meaning it packs is often commentary on various topics and has obviously been considered and thought about.

Vice have published a collection of nearly all of his Black Flag flyers. These are some of our favourites.

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HAROSHI AND BATTLE AT THE BERRICS

Has anyone here been keeping up with the 6th Battle At The Berrics? The level of skateboarding is downright nuts.

This year’s trophy was created by Haroshi, and artist who makes incredible things out of recycled skateboard decks, and who also skates. We thought it was pretty rad.

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“Battle At The Berrics” is the most watched game of S.K.A.T.E in the world, with top pros battling head to head, working their way through the brackets to become the Battle At The Berrics champion. The winner walks away with this incredible trophy made by Japanese artist Haroshi, know for his intricate work using pieces of reclaimed skate decks.

RICH PHIPSON INTERVIEW


Photo by Rochelle Phipson

Richard Phipson is a tattooer who moved from South Africa to Hong Kong and now co-owns Starcrossed Tattoos. Durban-born and bred, Rich has been active in art, tattooing and music for years. We caught up with him to chat about music, the transition from South Africa to Hong Kong and from graphic designer to tattooer, and some other things. Meet Rich Phipson…

Yo Rich! Give us a brief introduction to yourself.
I still don’t eat my veggies.
Still not sure which ones a shirt and which is a t-shirt.
I thought being this age would feel different.
Not all my friends have forgot me yet.
I don’t deserve to be interviewed.

Working originally as a graphic designer, you made quite a career change in deciding to become a tattooer. Can you tell us about why you decided to make that transition and how you got started tattooing?
Tattooing isn’t something you can pick up quickly or do part time. Anyone who thinks that isn’t tattooing, they’re doing something else. I had no choice. It becomes a part of my everything. My night and day. It still is. the process wasn’t intentional. Nothing about the last five years has been though. I’ve just tried my best to keep happy and do whatever moves me. There was a time when that’s what graphic design was for me; exciting. It’s hard to turn a hobby into a job and still appreciate it the way you did before. If you can or do then I think that’s enough to keep you going.

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You grew up and lived in Durban until a few years ago. Why did you decide to move to Hong Kong?
There’s something we carry. Well some of us do. It’s a curse and a blessing. It’s a drive that pushes us to be better and do better but also fools us into always thinking there’s something better. It’s the opposite of complacency. Discontented and dissatisfied. It’s what only let’s us see it after midnight and forces us to stay up to see the sunrise. I dunno if its specific to my generation or culture. But I know me and my friends have it. Also, at the time it seemed like a good idea.

4. What does your typical day look like?
I have two types of days.
Day one starts as late as possible, no food, maybe coffee. Bus to work. Tattoo. Shovel food. Tattoo some more. Hang with homies. Bus home. Eat and hang with Rochelle then draw until my eyes close from the bottom up. Repeat.
Day two hopefully starts earlier. Breakfast. Swim in the sea. Play guitar. Sit in the park. Paint. Dinner somewhere. Watch series. Lots of it.

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What are your best and worst things about South Africa? And Hong Kong?
SA has family, familiarity and a beauty that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. I’ve sacrificed these for safety, both physically and financially.

Besides tattooing, what do you do in your spare time?
Watch loads of series, eat too much chocolate, and play guitar.

Being based in a city where millions of tourists from all over the world travel to or through, you must get some strange people coming into Starcrossed. What are some of the weirder encounters you’ve had?
The weird becomes the norm pretty quickly, but I’ve tattooed a man wearing a panda suit and been given a $7000 tip before.

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Would you say that you have a favorite style of tattoo to do, and if so, what is it?
Not really. There’s more stuff that I don’t like doing. As long as the client gives me creative freedom with their idea I’m generally happy.

What do the local Cantonese people think of tattoos? You are pretty tattooed yourself. I can imagine you get a lot of stares. Although, maybe I am just naive and coming from a South African context, where people generally are still very conservative.
It’s pretty similar here to SA. There are rude people everywhere that feel that because you have colour on your skin they can touch it. But generally the stares aren’t too bad.

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Some people will know of you from playing drums in the infamous Durban hardcore band, Crossingpoint, doing vocals in Joburg hardcore band, Compass, and being involved in some other projects before that. Music has been a big part of your life. Do you have any plans to do anything in Hong Kong? What is the music scene like there?
Yeah, it’s still one of the biggest things in my life. I’ve had plans since I got here, but nothing has worked out yet, but hopefully soon. The music scene is okay. It’s cool to be able to see bigger bands that come through here, but there’s definitely a lack of punk-ethos subcultures. I think it’s got to do with wealth and complacency. But that’s a whole separate rant.

What have you been listening to recently?
Today: O Brother, The Story So Far, Yellow Ostrich, Such Gold and the Local Natives.

What advice would you give someone who wanted to quit their job and do something like you did?
If you wanted to do it you would have done it.

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PATTERN LANGUAGE – RODAN KANE HART

Rodan Kane Hart. Shapes: Rotated. 2013. Mild Steel.

Pattern Language, an exhibition by South African artist, Rodan Kane Hart, is happening at the Whatiftheworld gallery in Woodstock, Cape Town, tonight.

Whatiftheworld is pleased to present ‘Pattern Language’ by Rodan Kane Hart, an exhibition of new sculpture, sculptural inlays, and installation.

In this exhibition Hart continues to explore experiential structures and sculptures. Inspired by architectural forms found in the urban environments of his native Johannesburg and Cape Town, his recent series of steel sculptures explore the notion of generative shape, pattern and form in relation to the viewers experience. These works attempt to stimulate a heightened emotional response through their illusionistic and fragmented forms.

Referencing Christopher Alexander’s architectural, urban design and community livability book titled A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction, published in 1977, Pattern Language attempts to identify, expose and ‘unpack’ the ideological constructs that underpin numerous urban forms found within these contemporary South African cities.

Hart’s most recent solo exhibition titled Structure (2013) presented a series of minimal steel sculptures, drawings & books investigating the ideological impulses that are revealed when manufacturing tectonic forms and how a better understanding of these impulses allows a more complex reading of these built environments. Using sculpture as a lens through which to view historical and spatial contexts, Hart creates shifts in context which intern become generators of experience. Activated by the movement viewer the shape and form of the work unfolds as time and motion proceeds.

Referencing the theory outlined in pattern language Hart focuses on the notion of pattern in a broad sense. Within a sculptural and visual paradigm pattern is deployed to track problem solving in a context of design as well as social transformation and urban environments. The underlying theory manifests in layout, city grids, paths of desire and built form, social interaction, human inhabitancy, connectivity and conversation.

A Pattern Language details how individuals could be empowered and equipped with the tools and language responsible for the design and construction of communities that reflected both their interests and those of the broader public. The book attempts to expose the function of language within design, the authors mention that in designing environments people will enviably always rely on certain visual ‘languages’ that allowing them to coherently articulate and communicate an infinite variety of designs within a formal system.

Click on the poster below to see the event on Facebook:

BLACK LUNG ACOUSTIC SHOW POSTER

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Local Cape Town band, Black Lung, are playing a show soon, and we thought that the poster for it was awesome. The pencil and watercolours give it such a DIY, honest feel.

The show will be at &Union on the 5th of June, and it has free entrance! Get there if you can. For those who didn’t know, Black Lung features one of our riders, Justus Kotze, who also created the poster for the event.

Check out the event on Facebook here: http://www.facebook.com/events/675285839153240/

THE SOUND OF DUST; A SHORT FILM

The Sound of Dust from Hidden Notice on Vimeo.

Film short documenting the work and philosophy of Huntington Beach surfboard shaper Tim Stamps. A look into Tim’s world of quality and craftsmanship.

We thought that this video was beautiful; crisp, high quality footage, and an interesting, historically rich story. Hope you enjoy it as much as we did. Surfing doesn’t usually pay a big part in the culture we’re a part of, but it is also an ‘alternative sport’, and there is nothing like a good inspirational short film.

RICHARD GILLIGAN CAPTURES DIY SKATEBOARDING

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photographer Richard Gilligan captures the DIY and collaborative spirit of skateboarding with his series title “DIY”.

“diy can be described as a movement within skateboarding which operates outside civic and societal norms. through the utilisation of skater-constructed spaces, which are ordinarily, an adaptation of existing, but often abandoned, terrain in both urban and rural settings, the modern skateboarder transcends the need to exist within a more conventional environment.

utilising found materials, these unauthorised and often illegal temporary constructions have fascinated photographer richard gilligan, who has spent the past four years tracking down these ephemeral spaces throughout europe and the us. his pictures show how skaters and diy builders free themselves from the constraints of societal rules, creating their own domain in which to practice this peripheral pursuit.”

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

Photo by Richard GilliganRichard Gilligan: DIY

SANJAY & CRAIG BY JAY HOWELL

One of our favourite skateboard artists, Jay Howell, has been working on this show alongside friends Andreas Trolf and Jim Dirschberger for the last two years. It premieres on Nickelodeon this Saturday, but we aren’t sure what that means for when it’ll be in South Africa. It looks amazing though. We can’t wait to see it.

PHOTO OF THE DAY

Every Time I Die - JJ van Rooyen

Every Time I Die (USA) playing at the Assembly in Cape Town on Saturday 27 April 2013.

Photo by JJ van Rooyen.

RAOUL GOETZE INTERVIEW

Raoul GoetzePhoto by Dirk Steenkamp

Raoul Goetze is a Cape Town tattooer at Wildfire Tattoos, an artist, and a member of the band Wild Eastern Arches. He is also one of the artist exhibiting work at the Doors of Perception art exhibition on the 23rd of May at Revolution Woodstock. We caught up with him to chat about the upcoming exhibition, art, music and what ‘psychedelic’ means. Meet Raoul Goetze…

How is your artwork coming along for the Doors of Perception art exhibition? Any hints for what we can expect to see?

I’m always in two minds when it comes to executing ideas. It’s a constant debate on how I will try translate the visuals in my head to a tangible form, so consequently it becomes a bit of an irrational completion, which is definitely part of the process I guess. So yeah, my artworks are getting there for the exhibition. For Doors of Perception, I’m trying to explore what really happens chemically when psychedelic drugs are introduced to the brain.

Raoul Goetze

You are quite a creative person: tattooing, making art, and playing in a band. What else do you get up to in your spare time?

Well, I really love everything I’m involved with, so when I have free time, I don’t really consider it as spare time seeing that I wouldn’t mind drawing or playing guitar in that time. Otherwise I probably end up with friends talking about all these things over a couple of beers anyways. I am involved with Psych Night, which probably comes with playing in a band as well.

Why do you make art?

I’m a visual person. I have a need to translate whatever goes on in my head to a visual format.

Raoul Goetze

Tell us about Psych Night…

Psych Night is a collective hosting events celebrating psychedelia, whether it’s music or any other art form. We’re a group of like-minded friends all involved in music industry some way or another. Psych Night hosts flagship events at The Assembly bi-monthly and have smaller events in between at various venues. Apart from a photography exhibition on Austin Psych Fest by Mark Reitz, Doors of Perception will be our first event exploring psychedelic inspired art.

Cape Town is quite an “international” city i.e. the city gets thousands of tourists every year. Being a tattooer at Wildfire Tattoos on Long Street, you must get quite a few strange tourists walking in. What are a few of the weirder/strange/funny comments or requests that you have heard working there?

Apart from some tourists just being extremely odd, there have just been too many. From asking for a South African tribal to just the extend of a language barrier where nothing that comes out of their mouths sound human or appropriate.

Raoul Goetze

How would you describe your favorite type of tattoo to do? Do you have a personal favorite tattoo that you’ve done?

I don’t necessarily have a favourite tattoo that I’ve done, but when I get a chance to interpret a subject matter in my own way, I obviously enjoy the tattoo more seeing that it’ll automatically turn into a style that I would like to do. I really enjoy doing traditional tattoos, also with some sort of geometric elements in them.

What is your opinion on tattooing in South Africa? Do you think that we’re at the level we should be? How do you think we match up to international standards?

I think people underestimate the talent locally. We definitely match up to international standards. You will obviously always get tattoo artists and shops that never went the right route of doing things and poor quality tattoos are the result, but the same problem occurs internationally as well, if not more. The few artists that are truly great with what they do reach international standards without out a doubt. It’s just a matter of doing research and finding the right ones to get tattooed by.

Raoul Goetze

Can you tell us more about your band Wild Eastern Arches? What do you play? How many of you are there? What genre do you play? etc.

We’re a psychedelic band that started in 2012. Our music draws inspiration from various fields such as 70s rock n roll, a bit experimental and I guess shoegaze as well. Psychedelic would probably just be a term used as a main vessel to merge all our individual influences together. We consist of 5 members. I play guitar and bass.

Favourite tattooer, artist, and band?

Favourite tattooer and artist would be Thomas Hooper. Favourite band, either Zeppelin, The Black Angels or Night Beats.

You make ‘psychedelic’ art, and play in a ‘psychedelic’ band. What is your definition of ‘Psychedelic’?

Feeling it.

www.raoulgoetze.com
www.facebook.com/wildeasternarches
www.tattoo.co.za

Raoul GoetzePhoto by Mark Reitz

Raoul GoetzePhoto by Dirk Steenkamp

Raoul Goetze

Raoul Goetze

Raoul Goetze

Raoul Goetze

RVCA ANP ARTISTS WESLEY VAN EEDEN + PAUL SENYOL

RVCA ANP artists Paul Senyol and Wesley van Eeden have a new exhibition up at A Word of Art gallery in the Woodstock Industrial Centre in Cape Town. The show will be running until the 25th May which features 9 new works from both artists as well as a limited edition Shirt, Print and zine supported by RVCA. Inside the zine is a one on one interview between the artists who chat about the exhibition, skateboarding and their creative process. Here are both their interviews that are in the zine.

1. Name, place, and some things we should know about you?

My name is Wesley van Eeden and I live in Durban. I grew up wanting to be a professional skateboarder but because I could never afford a pro deck, I used to paint my own graphics on the boards I rode. This was my introduction to the art world and from then on discovered DIY ethics in Punk Rock and realized that anyone could become an artist if they wanted to.

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iamseries Wesley van Eeden (inspiration) from Okuhle Magcaba on Vimeo.

2. When we were in Finland together, I noticed that you have quite a diligent work ethic and creative process, please give us a rundown of how you would go about creating new work for a show/client?

Before I studied Graphic Design, I think I lacked direction in my life; the only thing I really cared about was skateboarding. When eventually applying to go and study and not getting accepted at the University, I realized that I had to work a little harder. I spent a year going to a few private art lessons as my parents could not afford the foundation course at the University and then I had to reapply to the Design Program the following year. I was lucky enough to have been the last person to be accepted into the school, and this was only because someone above me decided to study Fashion Design! So from then I got an appreciation for what was given to me and cultivated a strong work ethic.

When creating work for a show I try and work on the name of the show and a short paragraph of what I’d like to achieve before I start drawing. Doing an exhibition is a lot harder than doing work for a client as there is no set deadline or a budget and or guidelines to follow, so it’s important for me to have a sense of where I want to go with the work. I then look at a colour palette that I’d like to use for the body of work, and this often is influenced by the type of mood I am wanting to convey. I am really influenced by found objects and using these as my canvas for my ideas. A lot of my work has an underlying theme of rebirth, forgiveness, loss, love and value. So after drawing a series of sketches, I then try and match a found object to the sketch.

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Transformative Gallery-20

3. Do you have a vision for the next 5 years of your career?

For the last two years I have managed to provide for my wife and our little boy, which makes me really happy. I am at the stage where I can divide my time between personal and commercial client work. I’d like to get to a stage where I am more reliant on my personal work than the commercial work that I do. Our residency in Finland was life changing and I’d like to do that again! Ideally I’d like to be able to not only do more shows around South Africa, but also in other countries as well. I like the idea of showing works in both weird and obscure places like Morocco as well as New York. That would be great I think.

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4. What does transformative bring to your attention, and how have you interpreted the title for this 2
person show?

When coming up with the show title, I had originally suggested the title: Transformative Moments. I first heard this term in an interview with Ian Makaye of Fugazi. He was explaining how we do things in our lives without knowing the impact of it in years to come. This really made me think about how we often take for granted our everyday existence, and how each thing we do today is influencing how we live tomorrow, next week, next year and many years to come. For this exhibition, I have explored themes of contemplation of characters that are thinking of their past, present, and future. I have explored simplifying and isolating some elements, and even making some elements abstract as a metaphor for change within the individual.

Transformative Gallery-21

Transformative Opening-31

5. Tell us something about Paul Senyol?

Paul Senyol is a hardworking guy. He is honest, caring and probably one of the best cooks in the world! If he ever invites you for a meal at his studio you should always say yes! He makes the best flat bread pizza in the world! I discovered his work before I met him and I loved it instantly. His work has a timeless quality about it that speaks honesty and truth – a reflection of who he is as a human being. I am always honoured to do shows with him.

www.hopeproject.co.za

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1. Who is Paul Senyol and why are you an artist?

Paul Senyol was born on 25 October 1980; I have been drawing since I was first given a pencil. Never really gave it much thought to become an artist full-time, until my mid-twenties. There was a definite day that I decided to become a painter, but even before that I was intrigued by process, building things, experimenting, making fires, beauty and adventure. In a way I explore those primarily through the medium of painting, or whatever else is at hand to execute an idea. I really enjoy making beautiful things.

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2. Looking at your work that you did from a young age, I can see how you have evolved, yet I can still see your style in it. Is there any direct influence to your aesthetic and style that you have created for yourself?

Within my work, a lot of the time aesthetic drives me, how something looks and feels, shapes, colour, form, lines, and emotion are all very important to me. When I first started to recognise that I do actually like to draw and paint, my works were very much only line based, simple one-colour drawings. Then I discovered paint (without brushes), I could do more things now that I had color. Then came brushes, then I started to combine the pens, pencils and paints, and that is where I really started to enjoy myself, because each medium has a specific feel and texture, and so as I combine mediums and layers, I go on a bit of an adventure with colour and shape and form and line weight, etc. So in a way, as I am working on new paintings, I like to consider what I have learnt as a painter, but to still explore and push myself to create an artwork that was better than the previous one. I am constantly refining, and redefining my pre-process, process and final outcome of an artwork. I do also like to break out of my traditional process and do something a little different, usually from something small that I found attractive within a previous work. From spending time with you in Finland, you will remember that for the first month I didn’t even paint, I wanted to go into the studio and discover something fresh, so I spent a lot of time in the library, researching artists and Designers and people from the area, immersing myself in the culture, taking long bike rides and immersing myself in the landscape, discovering. Sometimes I would just trace and trace and trace, draw, draw, draw, and through that I started to discover new processes, approaches and avenues within my work. For that first month I worked almost exclusively with black acrylic paint, pencils, trace paper and white folio. Experimentation and exploration are key to my work.

5

3. What drives you to continue working at such a prolific rate? Do you have a manifesto or a message that you trying to get out?

I wouldn’t say that I have some manifesto or message that I am pushing, but I do know that I feel stale and stagnant if I am not pursuing something creative. Even if it means taking a break from painting for a week and exploring being creative on a surfboard, skateboard, bicycle, or going to see other art shows, or browsing the local Woodstock gang Graffiti scrawls. I am starting to realise that God put something in me that causes me to create and to be drawn to creativity and beautiful things, and I just can’t escape that. It is who I am in a way. Although it doesn’t define me, it is very much a natural part of who I am as a person. So it finds its way out of me in daily life in some way. Sometimes it’s just preparing a nice meal.. the flavours, colors, and presentation.

shirt

4. What does Transformative bring to your attention, and how have you interpreted the title for this 2 person show?

Our society and life is in a constant state of transformation, life itself is naturally transformative. In my approach to the exhibition, and the works, I took a closer look at the fabric of my everyday life, and more so to those around me. I looked at walls, people, streets, trash, trees, and birds and I looked around for interesting ways to convey this feeling of transformation in and around Woodstock. I tried to become an observer, but that can only take place for a short time until you start to become involved and a part of the transformation process. One day I picked up a small notebook, full of children’s drawings, notes and scrawls, most of the work references this small book at some point. Having a studio in Woodstock, and spending a lot of time there, I started to realise that a lot of what I am seeing and experiencing won’t really exist in the next 5 years. People will move out and onward, new people will come and stay. Lives will change. Kids will grow up. Also that there were many, many people who came before me, and will still come after me. It fascinates me to think that a few blocks from our studio is beach road, and that once upon a time you could walk a few minutes and dip your feet in the ocean. In a way I wish that was still true.
My favourite works for the show are ‘the butcher’, ‘the baker’ and ‘the candlestick maker’. In these works I try to convey the transience of local producers and craftsmen. All around Woodstock you see so much decay and poverty and people in really bad situations, but there are glimpses of hope and promise. I was inspired by the following text:

Those from among you
Shall build the old waste places;
You shall raise up the foundations of many generations;
And you shall be called the Repairer of the Breach,
The Restorer of Streets to Dwell In.

zine

5. Tell us something about Wesley van Eeden?

Wesley van Eeden is a thoughtful and kind-hearted man, gentle and patient. A very creative individual. Taller than me. Married. A dad. A thinker. One of my favourite collaborators. A true friend who knows that love and sacrifice are the same thing.

www.senyol.blogspot.com

SNEAK PEAK HAROSHI’S STUDIO

Internationally acclaimed skateboard artist gives us a sneak peak into his art studio. He is known for taking reclaimed skateboards and creating beautiful works of art out of them. Inside his studio he shares with us posters, classic skateboard videos and other random memorabilia.

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RVCA ANP ARTIST PAUL SENYOL

RVCA ANP artists Paul Senyol and Wesley van Eeden have a new exhibition up at A Word of Art gallery in the Woodstock Industrial Centre in Cape Town. The show will be running until the 25th May which features 9 new works from both artists as well as a limited edition Shirt, Print and zine supported by RVCA. Inside the zine is a one on one interview between the artists who chat about the exhibition, skateboarding and their creative process. Today we share Paul’s interview in the zine and we’ll feature Wesley’s next week.

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1. Who is Paul Senyol and why are you an artist?

Paul Senyol was born on 25 October 1980; I have been drawing since I was first given a pencil. Never really gave it much thought to become an artist full-time, until my mid-twenties. There was a definite day that I decided to become a painter, but even before that I was intrigued by process, building things, experimenting, making fires, beauty and adventure. In a way I explore those primarily through the medium of painting, or whatever else is at hand to execute an idea. I really enjoy making beautiful things.

14

2. Looking at your work that you did from a young age, I can see how you have evolved, yet I can still see your style in it. Is there any direct influence to your aesthetic and style that you have created for yourself?

Within my work, a lot of the time aesthetic drives me, how something looks and feels, shapes, colour, form, lines, and emotion are all very important to me. When I first started to recognise that I do actually like to draw and paint, my works were very much only line based, simple one-colour drawings. Then I discovered paint (without brushes), I could do more things now that I had color. Then came brushes, then I started to combine the pens, pencils and paints, and that is where I really started to enjoy myself, because each medium has a specific feel and texture, and so as I combine mediums and layers, I go on a bit of an adventure with colour and shape and form and line weight, etc. So in a way, as I am working on new paintings, I like to consider what I have learnt as a painter, but to still explore and push myself to create an artwork that was better than the previous one. I am constantly refining, and redefining my pre-process, process and final outcome of an artwork. I do also like to break out of my traditional process and do something a little different, usually from something small that I found attractive within a previous work. From spending time with you in Finland, you will remember that for the first month I didn’t even paint, I wanted to go into the studio and discover something fresh, so I spent a lot of time in the library, researching artists and Designers and people from the area, immersing myself in the culture, taking long bike rides and immersing myself in the landscape, discovering. Sometimes I would just trace and trace and trace, draw, draw, draw, and through that I started to discover new processes, approaches and avenues within my work. For that first month I worked almost exclusively with black acrylic paint, pencils, trace paper and white folio. Experimentation and exploration are key to my work.

5

3. What drives you to continue working at such a prolific rate? Do you have a manifesto or a message that you trying to get out?

I wouldn’t say that I have some manifesto or message that I am pushing, but I do know that I feel stale and stagnant if I am not pursuing something creative. Even if it means taking a break from painting for a week and exploring being creative on a surfboard, skateboard, bicycle, or going to see other art shows, or browsing the local Woodstock gang Graffiti scrawls. I am starting to realise that God put something in me that causes me to create and to be drawn to creativity and beautiful things, and I just can’t escape that. It is who I am in a way. Although it doesn’t define me, it is very much a natural part of who I am as a person. So it finds its way out of me in daily life in some way. Sometimes it’s just preparing a nice meal.. the flavours, colors, and presentation.

shirt

4. What does Transformative bring to your attention, and how have you interpreted the title for this 2 person show?

Our society and life is in a constant state of transformation, life itself is naturally transformative. In my approach to the exhibition, and the works, I took a closer look at the fabric of my everyday life, and more so to those around me. I looked at walls, people, streets, trash, trees, and birds and I looked around for interesting ways to convey this feeling of transformation in and around Woodstock. I tried to become an observer, but that can only take place for a short time until you start to become involved and a part of the transformation process. One day I picked up a small notebook, full of children’s drawings, notes and scrawls, most of the work references this small book at some point. Having a studio in Woodstock, and spending a lot of time there, I started to realise that a lot of what I am seeing and experiencing won’t really exist in the next 5 years. People will move out and onward, new people will come and stay. Lives will change. Kids will grow up. Also that there were many, many people who came before me, and will still come after me. It fascinates me to think that a few blocks from our studio is beach road, and that once upon a time you could walk a few minutes and dip your feet in the ocean. In a way I wish that was still true.
My favourite works for the show are ‘the butcher’, ‘the baker’ and ‘the candlestick maker’. In these works I try to convey the transience of local producers and craftsmen. All around Woodstock you see so much decay and poverty and people in really bad situations, but there are glimpses of hope and promise. I was inspired by the following text:

Those from among you
Shall build the old waste places;
You shall raise up the foundations of many generations;
And you shall be called the Repairer of the Breach,
The Restorer of Streets to Dwell In.

zine

5. Tell us something about Wesley van Eeden?

Wesley van Eeden is a thoughtful and kind-hearted man, gentle and patient. A very creative individual. Taller than me. Married. A dad. A thinker. One of my favourite collaborators. A true friend who knows that love and sacrifice are the same thing.

www.senyol.blogspot.com

RVCA BEN HORTON

RVCA ANP Artist Ben Horton recently opened his solo show “Landline” at Linksoul Lab in Oceanside, CA. We recently did a day in the life with Ben and if you missed it you can check it out here.

You can also listen to a really rad podcast interview with Ben over here.

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URBAN ART FESTIVAL

The City of Gold Urban Art Festival 2013 will take place from the 7 – 13 April. The individual elements that make up the week long festival include an exhibition, large-scale mural projects, film-screenings and street art tours. Its all happening in Jozi so check out the site for more details on all the events over here.

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ERIK OTTO: ARTIST PROFILE

Erik Otto likes to build things. He paints, draws and often creates interesting wooden sculptures out of found objects. This video profiles the artist and some of his recent project works and exhibitions including his recent show “Tomorrow is Never Promised”.

ROA AND SKATEISTAN

The Sk8room is the first online platform to promote skateboards from around the world that are works of art. To get the wheels rolling they recently collaborated with street artist Roa on 3 variations of limited edition skateboard. Twenty percent of all sales are donated to Skateistan who are a not for profit empowerment program that teaches children how to skateboard in places like Cambodia and Afghanistan.

POSESSED SKATE EXHIBITION

Check out this rad video feature on Transworld SKATEboarding’s photogaphy team that recently put up a photography exhibition in San Jose, California. Featuring their senior photographer Dave Chami as well as Joe Brook, Dave Chami, Rhino, Jon Humphries, Kyle Camarillo, Wes Tonascia, Chris Patton, Jai Tanju and Brendan Klein.

JUSTIN POULTER ARTIST INTERVIEW

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1. Who is Justin Poulter, what did you study and how did you get into doing what you do as career?

I was born in Cape Town, and grew up on the Indian and Atlantic side. Probably like most illustrators, I was encouraged by family and school to draw from an early age. I did art in school as well as after school classes on and off. When it came to finishing high school I made the decision to go study graphic design, opposed to my original plan to study art. Illustration was my primary interest so by the end of it, my portfolio was mainly illustration.

capetown

2. Where there any key influences in your life that influenced you to lead a creative life. Did skateboarding influence you in any way?

Skateboarding was a big part of it. I obsessed about skate graphics as a kid, I think partly cause my mom could only afford to by me mini logo blanks… Certain graphics also always just stuck in my mind, like Sean Clivers boards for Hook-ups and Powell or some of the classic Jim Phillips graphics.

carhartticons

3. Before leaving to the U.K you started One Horse Town and then got a job at I LOVE DUST? Why the move?

I decided I needed to learn more from more experienced people. I also wanted the big studio experience and the chance to work on some good international clients, not to mention the British experience.. all good things.

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carhartt

4. Working for such a highly acclaimed international agency is incredible. What was the experience like working for them?

I learnt a lot at ILD and got to work with some very experienced talented people. Also living in another country was a good experience. The south of England, particularly Portsmouth was something quite different and unique. I got consumed in football and pub culture.

beach

5. Was there anything valuable that you learnt why working there?

It is a very fast paced studio. Super quick turn around on jobs meant that I had to learn how to take lots of shortcuts when necessary. Also, before at One Horse Town I was purely focused on my own style but at ilovedust I was expected to be completely adaptable. However, I think this helped develop my own style more.

ILOVEDUST Artwalk Murals at The US Open of Surf. from ilovedust on Vimeo.

6. You were also lucky enough to travel to the States to work on a mural for Nike’s surf event. How was that?

It was my first time in the States so that was an experience in itself. Got to see a bit of LA and then quite a bit of the coast. I’ve done a few bits of mural painting before but this was the biggest I have ever been involved in, so it was a good learning experience. The illustration had to be approved by Nike before we did it so it was a challenge to get it looking exactly like what we had drawn up small scale. I also got to watch and meet a load of pro skaters I’ve followed since and early age at the Coastal Carnage.

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7. You now back in South Africa working for an equally and well respected agency AMICOLLECTIVE. Are you happy to be back in a warmer country?

Yes, I’ve always been a huge fan of Am I so im very honored to be a part of it here. Also of course the weather is much better! I spoke to some friends back in the UK yesterday and they just got hit by a blizzard.

8. Do you think illustrators that are based in South Africa are disadvantaged in getting great client work like agencies based in bigger international cities like London? Or do you think the internet is bridging that gap?

Not at all. The internet is bringing everyone together. However, I do think that meeting clients and agencies in person helps build relationships and more personal connections that could get you the work over the next guy.

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8. Any exciting news you’d like to share with regards to exhibitions or projects?

Right now I am pretty focused on work here at Am I. But, as always I will be taking on little projects that I am into in my spare time. Hopefully some so gig posters or skateboard graphics.

9. Where can we see more of your fantastic work?

http://www.behance.net/justinpoulter

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POP UP ART INSTALLATION AT REVOLUTION

Simon Berndt has a small pop up installation at the new Revolution Store in Woodstock, Cape Town. Featuring some of his personal artworks as well as his incredible Zulu Zombies Skateboard range that has recently been launched. If you in the area go check out this talented artists work and check out some of the fresh products at the store!

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INNOVATOR OF THE MONTH

Thomas Campbell was born in 1969 and is a California based artist who explores various art disciplines ranging from painting to film making. His work has appeared on the Ugly Casanova album “Sharpen Your Teeth” as well being featured in Juxtapoz, Arrested Motion and Beautiful Decay among others.

Thomas grew up surfing and skating in California before he moved to New York in the 1980’s. This is where he got involved in various subcultures including, street art, punk rock, hip hop as well as Aaron Rose’s Alleged Gallery. Thomas Campbell along with Ed Templeton and other “skate” artists have become highly influential artists when The Beautiful Losers exhibition and movie was released in 2004. Thomas Campbell is currently exhibiting his latest art project at
Santa Cruz’s Museum Of Modern Art.

Krooked Skateboarding presents the Thomas Campbell Guest board from dlxsf on Vimeo.

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VANS CUSTOM CULTURE

The Vans design team heads out to Laguna College of Art and Design to get them to design a unique collection of Vans Shoes. The students share their opinions on design, research and inspiration.

RVCA ARTIST KELSEY BROOKES

RVCA interviews Kelsey Brookes from San Diego. Kelsey Brookes creates mind blowing repeat patterns and discuss’s his transition from being involved in the biotech industry to becoming a full time artist.

HOW & NOSM PAINT

Twin brothers Raul and Davide Perre aka How and Nos

Identical twin brothers How and Nosm (Raoul and Davide Perre) recently completed this huge mural in San Francisco at Hyde St & Turk St. The duo were born in Spain, German in heritage, and currently residing in New York. Their show Late Confessions concludes Saturday in NYC at Jonathan Levine.

BACK IN 5 MINS TYPOGRAPHY EXHIBITION

During February & March Salon91 celebrates design and typography with ‘Back in 5 minutes’ an exhibition featuring an award winning set of local designers, typographers and illustrators.

Each artist has approached the discipline of typography in a fresh & unique style, playing with scale, materials, surface quality, form, colour, dimensionality & of course, words.

Launching 27th February 2013.

MISS VAN

Street artist Miss Van is in the latest issue of VNA. After a break from painting she is back in Sao Paulo getting inspired by the surroundings and excited to paint again.

RVCA MURAL VIDEO

A couple of weeks ago we shared with you some pictures of the mural that Wesley van Eeden and Paul Senyol created at RVCA’s new factory shop in J-Bay. The video just dropped online and you can check out the process of how they created this one.

FAITH 47 NEW VIDEO

Street artist Faith 47 doesn’t seem to stop. This new video is a little different from her past murals and is animated by Inka Kendzia painted on the corner of Williams and Sussex st, Woodstock in Cape Town.

MEMORY FOAM EXHIBITION

Legendary skateboarder Ed Templeton who is known for his insane graphics with Toy Machine is also a well known artist who shot to fame with the exhibition and movie The Beautiful Losers. His current exhibition titled “Memory Foam” is showing at the Roberts & Tilton art gallery in California. His photographs for this exhibition are mostly black and white and have a natural innocence to it.

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WAYS OF SEEING EXHIBITION

Here are some pictures from the new exhibition that just opened at A Word Of Art in Cape Town. If you in the area make sure you check it out before it closes on 9th March 2013.
A photo journal documenting A painting project curated by Ricky Lee Gordon aka Freddy Sam (Cape Town) with international artists in residence KNOW HOPE (Tel Aviv), Gaia (NY), Franco JAZ Fasoli (Buenos Aires)

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JONATHAN SHERWOOD ARTIST INTERVIEW

How old are you?
31

How long have you been in UK?

Just over 2 years now.

Studies & Work experience?

I studied Graphic Design at tech before starting work at an advertising agency called ADDC. We did loads of FMCG work there and it was an amazing learning experience dealing with massive brands so early out of school. Doing projects for Unilever and Tiger brands was literally getting thrown in at the deep end but what I learnt there was invaluable. I worked there for 2 years before deciding to start my own company distributing BMX brands in SA. Although I studied design what I was (and still am) really in love with was brands and brand development. The design side was aesthetically exciting, but brand development has so many more layers to it. Starting Empire allowed me to follow that path while putting my energy into BMX which was something I really loved. At the time there was almost nothing available in SA and I wanted to try do something positive for the local BMX scene. I can hardly put into words how amazing those times were. After 6 years of running it on my own I teamed up with Clay at RSS and from there my focus shifted back to design where I was doing all the creative for his brands KFD, Killer, and Verb. That chapter is one I look back on with great memories. Being a designer who skated as a kid you always dream of being able to design at least 1 board in your lifetime. After 2 years at RSS I had had done more then 20, and the line of Killer softgoods I had worked on was outselling brands like Volcom in the Revolution stores which blew my mind. It was a good team of people working on awesome projects which motivates you in its self. After that the opportunity came up for me to work for Fox at their European Head office in the UK. Up until then Id worked in advertising, the BMX and cycling industry, skate and a little surf at RSS, so when the chance came up to work at Fox which is a strong Moto brand it just seemed to make sense as a new chapter. In the past I had run all of FOX’s BMX events in SA, so I knew the brand well and the new opportunity was something I just couldn’t pass up. Ive now been working for Fox for just over 2 years and have loved every minute of it. It now looks like I will be based out of Barcelona moving forward where I will be part of a new chapter for Fox. Its not a place I ever thought Id end up but Im looking forward to it.

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What are you working on at the moment?

Im currently the digital marketing manager for Europe so pretty much all of the work I now do is in the digital realm. One of the major projects Im constantly busy with is maintaining and developing all of the brands digital platforms. This includes the website www.foxeurope.com as well as all of our B2B platforms, social media, and video projects. Right now Im trying to organise a series of team edits that will focus on our top athletes. Making sure all the concepts are locked in and the production is sorted out is one thing, but trying to get the riders all in one place and healthy ready to ride is another!

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How did you get into riding bmx? How has this shaped who you have become?

I owned a BMX for many years as a kid but to me it was just a bicycle. It was only after my parents sold it and got me a nice shiny MTB at the age of 11 that I found out what BMX was really about. A few short months after getting that MTB I told my folks I wanted to sell it and get a BMX again and ride it properly. They thought I was crazy but I did it and have never looked back since. That was 21 years ago now.

As far as shaping my life I believe it has had a massive influence. Right from the start BMX was a small community with very little available in terms of bikes or spares. You literally had to make or fix things to keep your bike going, and because the scene was so small you had friends all over the country simply because you rode. I remember looking at old BMX Plus mags and wishing I could have UGP, Bomber, or Cardboard Lords number plate for my race bike. There was no way I could ever get one so I would ride around the neighborhood looking for estate agent or security company sign boards. It was the only way you could get your hands on the right type of plastic in the right size. Id take them home and use thinners to wash off the signage, cut them into shape, and then draw my own graphics onto them. Its sounds crazy but thats how desperate I was haha. The same goes for bike pad sets or even T-shirts. We couldn’t get BMX clothing brands in SA so we just started our own. No one was organizing events so we just started organising our own contests. By the time I was 17 I had started “Clicked” clothing, and was running the National Dirt Jump series. Its not because I really wanted to either, I just felt if I didn’t do it there would be nothing going on so just decided to get it done. I used the money from weekend jobs to mail order parts from stores in the USA, and began ordering 2 or 3 of the things I wanted to sell on to other who needed them. The whole ethos was very much DIY, and looking back its clear that all those things I had to do to keep my interests alive are definitely the foundation for how I now make a living and even approach life in general.

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What are your other passions/interests?

Wow I dont really know where to start here! ha ha. I’m passionate about loads of things and at the same time they are all rather unrelated. The Thundercats obsession started while I was working at ADDC. At the time Vinyl toys were just starting to take off and I was looking at all these design figures selling on kidrobot and place like that. They were definitely rad, but it got me thinking back to when I was a kid and how crazy I was for the toys back then. Thundercats was my favorite show and I loved the toys as a kid and I could remember how excited I was walking into a Reggies store and looking at a wall full of my favourite characters. No matter how “cool” the vinyl figures were they just seemed so dull and lifeless compared to the old stuff, and in that instant I just had to have ALL the Thundercats! haha. It took me a year or so to finally complete the collection but I now own every single one (yes, including variations for all the nerds out there! haha). Thats not to say I don’t appreciate the Vinyl stuff as I do love it. Ive even done a few of them myself that have been featured on sites around the world, however I dont have a connection to them like I do with 80’s stuff.

Im also really into restoration and restoring old things. I love the idea you can take something that has essentially “expired” and bring it back to life again. It could be buildings, machines, cars, bikes, motorcycles or whatever. I just love the restoration process. This carries over into a few of my other passions and I love working on old VW’s and well as collecting and restoring mid school BMX bikes. Ive been into VW’s for ages but strangely although Ive been riding BMX for most of my life I only started collecting them fairly recently. Its something I’m completely obsessed with now, and I spend all night hunting down rare parts and bikes I want to own. I guess you could say I’m interested in anything that has influenced my life in some way, or has been an influence on the things that interest me.

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Who are you inspired by?

Im inspired by anyone who makes things happen, both for themselves and other people. You often see people spend loads of energy giving you 101 reasons why something cant happen, but I always feel if they spend half that energy actually trying to make it happen it probably would. So yea, anyone who stands up for what they believe in and works to make it a reality inspires me to do the same.

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How did you end up working overseas?

Well the European Marketing Director for Fox is Brode Vosloo (also a South African) and I had worked with him in the past on tours and events with Fox in SA. He got in touch with me and said there was a position opening up in his marketing team and wanted to know if I was interested. From that initial point of contact to the time I actually got here was almost a year, but it eventually happened. There is loads that goes into packing up your entire life and moving abroad, the paperwork alone is a nightmare, but in the end its so worth it.

What have been the best parts? Any surprises (good/bad)?

On a personal level the best part for me has been living in a place where you are no longer a minority. And by that Im referring to ones lifestyle, interests, and the ability to take part in those things you enjoy the most. As much as I love SA the things I love and enjoy are not easily accessible there.

On a work front its been great working right at the heart of a major brand. So often brands in SA are simply at distributor level, and that means no matter what your involvement with the brand you are always just forwarding on a pre determined idea or product from the brand to the consumer. By working at the Brand its self you are able to effect change right from the top, as well as learn a tremendous amount from people at the same time. Its a really rewarding experience.

On the flip side SA is a very unique and beautiful place. No where in the world is quite like it and you cant really substitute anything for it when you are living abroad. If you accept that and embrace your new surroundings then you will get on just fine, but if you constantly searching for that SA “vibe” in another country you will be disappointed. Accepting your new surroundings is really important if you want to move forward.

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What is your experience of working for an international brand?

So far its been great. As I said before the level of evolvement is so much more rewarding simply because you are at the heart of the brand. You have the ability to work on projects that shape the brands future, and ripple out across the entire world. At the same time working at this level is a great learning experience, and exposes you to aspects of business you wouldn’t otherwise be exposed to simply operating as a distributor.

What, over the years, has made the difference?

I think its really important not to limit yourself in work or life in general. Its not something that comes easily as you naturally want to live in your comfort zone, but I think if you can open up to new ideas you really benefit from it. Ive always had this idea that a person should never only surround themselves with like minded people. To me if you are going to live your life only interacting with people who think the same way as you then you may as well just be alone haha. You learn nothing from people who are just like you, and I think in some ways your outlook on life becomes very insular. You don’t have to agree with everyones opinions, but I think its important to take them on board and try understand why they think that way. If anything it will validate why you think differently, but at the same time by exposing yourself to new ideas your understanding is always improved, and the projects and ideas you are busy with work out so much better.

So yea, don’t limit yourself, aggressively pursue your passions, and don’t be scared to try new things. When something is no longer enjoyable close that chapter and find the next thing that is. Life’s too short to keep doing stuff just because you always have. It doesn’t matter if its a job, a project you are working on, and artistic style, or even the town you live in. If you not feeling it then change it up.

Did your work in the scene here (in SA) influenced the way you approach stuff there? (If yes, then how?)

Most definitely. Coming from SA you have to make things happen for yourself. And because of that when they do happen I think you appreciate them a lot more as well. Being an artist, a designer, a skater, a musician, or anything other then the “norm” is hard anywhere in the world, but I think you have a whole new set of limitations on top of that in SA as well. Having to learn to live with those and overcome them really gives a person an advantage when they are able to step outside, and work without those limitations in place. The whole DIY attitude that you have to have in SA is still something that will always be a part of my life no matter where I live.

What are you most proud of so far – in terms of your art/work/life in general?

I’m really proud of the work I did with Empire. I think we did a lot of good for the scene, and the legacy of that still lives on to this day. From a design point of view I really enjoyed the work I did at Revolution. Im not sure if technically any of it was a master piece haha, but I loved doing that stuff so I guess you could say Im proud of it. And I guess in general Im glad that I managed to get this far and still feel like Im having fun and learning a lot as I go along. You often hear people complaining about their jobs, or being bored, or wishing they could do things, so I feel very lucky that Im able to do what I do and have a good time with it.

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What are your own personal projects? (In the past, present, and going forward?)

Ive always had a few things on the go and still do. Ive owned a few clothing companies in my time all of which were a great experience. Clicked (which later became CLKD and then Bicykiller) was a clothing company I worked on with Tyrone and was probably my first step into the BMX industry. Empire was the biggest personal project I ever worked on and that was really rewarding. Currently the 2 projects Im busy with is the Highway Collective which is a clothing company based around my obsession with old VW’s. And then Im also just kicking off a project called Make Your Bones. This is a joint project between myself and Fraser Byrne. Myself and Fraser go way back and have always been working on little commercial projects together. This is our first official joint project though, and Im pretty excited about it. Its basically the manifestation of our different yet complimentary personal interests.

LINKS/WEBSITE:

My portfolio / blog
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RVCA COSTA RICA VIDEO

Check out the RVCA skate team in their skate adventure in Costa Rica. Kevin “Spanky: Long, Josh Harmony, Austin Steplen and Keegan Sauder show you how its done in the tropics. They also check out a live art installation by George Thompson.

SKATEBOARD ARCHITECTURE

American studio CODA just won this year’s annual MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program competition for their “Party Wall” sculpture. “Party Wall” will officially open in Long Island City at the end of June and will install a wall made from skateboard offcuts into the courtyard of the PS1 Contemporary Art Center. “Party Wall” is a linear structure also meant to incorporate events spaces, seating areas, stages, and projections areas, as well as pools of water that will function as “cooling stations.”

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HAROSHI THE SKATEBOARD ARTIST

Japanese artist Haroshi has just exhibited a new body of work at New York’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery. The famous sculptor known for his use of skate decks as his material has for this exhibition created a pair of Airwalks, bullets, skulls and an incredible life size skateboarder doing a hand plant. Haroshi has consistently used old skateboards as his medium for his artwork and this latest exhibition shows has continued love for skateboarding and art.

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