AUTOCONTROLE by Fabiano Rodrigues

Brazilian skateboarder, artist and photographer Fabiano Rodrigues has an exhibition on at the moment at Logo Gallery, made up of a new series of self-portraits. This is the teaser video for it.

In AUTOCONTROLE, Rodrigues explores the relationship of his own body, usually in movement, with the architecture and landscape of urban centres. A former skateboarder, Rodrigues captures the climax of his manoeuvres in compositions that are usually previously planned. The artist’s performative accuracy goes sometimes in harmony, sometimes in disarray, with architectural forms, resulting in great and geometric images, drawn by a magnificent play of light and shadows. In AUTOCONTROLE, Rodrigues continues photographing himself within symbolic and modernist constructions, such as Igreja da Pampulha (Pampulha Church) and Conjunto JK (Housing complex JK), both located in Belo Horizonte, in the state of Minas Gerais. The title of the exhibition alludes not only to the formal rigor of Rodrigues’ compositions, but also to the restraint and physical balance to which the artist submits his own body. His artistic process requires an intense physical training as well as a rigorous exercise of looking. It is the harmony of both that allows Rodrigues to capture the decisive moment, imprinting on the camera the perfect combination between space, light, body, and movement. Fabiano Rodrigues (Santos, 1974) lives and works in São Paulo. Rodrigues was the recipient of the Banco do Espírito Santo Acquisition Award during the SP-Arte 2012 edition, a prize that also led to a donation to the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo collection. In addition, Rodrigues’ work is part of the Instituto Figueiredo Ferraz collection. His most recent group shows include Deslize (Museu de Arte do Rio – MAR, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2013-2014), Love and Hate to Lygia Clark (Zacheta National Gallery of Art, Warsow, Poland, 2013-2014), FotoBienalMASP (Museu de Arte de São Paulo – MASP, São Paulo, Brazil, 2013), and Arte Contemporânea Brasileira (Estação Pinacoteca, São Paulo, Brazil, 2012).

Check out another rad video by Fabiano below…

FORMS: RODAN KANE HART EXHIBITION

Forms - Rodan Kane Hart Exhibition Poster

South African artist Rodan Kane Hart launched his exhibition last night. It’s on now at NIROXprojects, Arts on Main, Johannesburg. Go check it out!

FORMS / S | W
Rodan Kane Hart
12 March – 31 March 2014
NIROXprojects, 264 Fox Street, Arts on Main

NIROXprojects presents FORMS / S | W by Rodan Kane Hart. Following on from Structure, & Pattern Language (2013), Forms / S | W (2014) marks Hart’s third solo showcase in 2 ye­­­ars. The exhibition compromises an entirely new body of work consisting of sculpture, drawing, print & photography. These works follow on from previous points of enquiry regarding the constructed notion of the South African city. After a recent residency at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park in England, Hart has shifted his focus to more closely examining the influence of European architectural forms onto the urban fabric of South Africa.

RSVP to the Facebook event here.

Farshid Moussavi and Michael Kubo sum up the conceptual foundations of the exhibition as a whole in a book titled The Function of Ornament. A statement is made that succinctly deifies the relevance of architectural style and ornament, “Architecture needs mechanisms that allow it to become connected to culture”. Absorbing and capturing the forces that shape society achieve this cultural connection. These forces are then used as material components to work with, forming composite materiality. When two forces found within society, Invisible, meaning; Cultural, Political, and Temporal, and, Visible, meaning; Structural, Functional, and Physical, are brought together, it gives way to, a New Aesthetic Composition. Architectural style is not easily adjustable to the changes in culture and society. Modernists utilized transparency to represent architectural elements of space and structure; Post Modernists used Décor, whereas the Deconstructivists used geometrical collage to replace transparency all together. These concepts express the inextricable relationship between, Inside & Outside, Then & Now and Here & There.

Forms / S | W (S suggesting South = South Africa & W suggesting West = England) at NIROXprojects focuses on the formal influences of European Classism, Modernism and Post Modernism. An array of artistic medium has been utilized to present the historical and personal logic behind Hart’s formally abstracted works. Hart has intentionally incorporated more handcrafted methods with those of mechanical and digital processes, setting up a relationship between subject matter, time, theory and aesthetic. Works on display include…

Charcoal drawings & 35mm Black & White photographs inspired by architectural and natural forms found in the English cities of Manchester, Leeds, Liverpool & London, are presented alongside those depicting the South African cities of Johannesburg & Cape Town. These images explore the construction of spatial context by juxtaposing figurative representations with those of abstracted ones.

Being renowned for his life-sized steel sculptures Hart has taken a more intimate and crafted approach, by producing 4 smaller generative sculpture series consisting of 4 stages (each). Hart sees these sculptures as maquettes and studies for larger experiential projects, asserting the Russian Constructivists as an influence. Finally, a series of linocuts presenting the progression of line to shape and subsequently to form over 4 stages will also be on display.

OPEN HOURS: Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 4pm
NIROXprojects | 264 Fox Street | Arts on Main | MABONENG PRECINCT | Johannesburg CBD | +27 72 350 4326 | www.niroxarts.com

NATIVE NOSTALGIA EXHIBITION

Native Nostalgia

Native Nostalgia

On now!

Venue: The Museum of African Design
Address: 281 Commissioner Street, Johannesburg

Native Nostalgia
by Aaron Kohn

This exhibition tells the stories of bygone eras by positioning them firmly within present day narratives. Through architecture, construction, cartography, photography, communal archives, and historical reenactment, each artist and participant has a conversation with a past though which they did not live by juxtaposing the design elements of the past with those of today.

The exhibition title comes from Jacob Dlamini’s 2009 Native Nostalgia, in which he probes the ethical justification for fond memories of a childhood in a South African township. How, he asks, can a black South African can reflect on something so deplorable with nostalgia? The works in this show represent a related form of nostalgia: the nostalgia for a troubled time through which one did not live.

For example, Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou reflects on the narrative of Benin’s capital, Porto Novo, through the traditional role of women, ceremonial masks, and the Aguda architectural style largely brought back from Brazil by slaves who were deported from there after the early-1800s slave revolts. The designs in the women’s fabrics and masks, as well as the topless dress, contrast with the peeling paint and ornate Portuguese-style woodwork. On top of that, the portraiture itself is unquestionably contemporary.

Meanwhile, I See A Different You’s 19[ ] Mercedes [MODEL] is parked in the middle of the gallery, a physical specimen of design that the duo drive in their everyday life. Rather than bask in the glory of contemporary vehicular stylings, I See a Different You lives with one foot firmly planted in the political and [artistic/creative/design] past. Their other foot allows their work to depict similar contemporary appropriations of historical design elements.

These juxtapositions are reflective of a broader trend toward nostalgia. For South Africans in their early twenties and younger, South Africa is defined more by the post-1994 intersection of Mandela-style reconciliation and rapid globalization than it is by the struggle against Apartheid. Perhaps because they did not live through the darker days of Apartheid, twenty-somethings buy domestic worker outfits for parties and listen to house music alongside older Marabi jazz.

The works in this exhibition display the deep complexity of Native Nostalgia.

There is also multi media spatial intervention by the Kalashnikovv Gallery and Cuss ZA.

Cuss Artist Statement – INDODA
Creative Direction – Mina Lundgren x Ravi Govender
Performance – Simiso Zwane
Music – Zamani Xolo x Simiso Zwane

This collaboration between Swedish designer Mina Lundgren and myself Ravi Govender see’s us focussing on the Kanga textile and its graphic motifs with reference to its place in Zulu culture. The Khanga itself has been appropriated by diviners across South Africa as part of their dress code, and has strong varied meaning as a result. Themes from Zulu culture, such as strength and masculinity, power and the introduction of the false prophet into contemporary culture are also focussed on. The idea was to create a costume for a character that embodies these features. To aesthetically personify mysticism that is present in an expression that is current to africa. It is to also bridge the gap between international representation, with the creation of a fashion video installation. For this, the technique of green screen is incorporated to enhance the visual
aesthetic of movement and work with the idea of lo-fi video production across the continent.

Kalashnikovv Gallery Statement

The Cuss x Kalashnikovv Gallery Spatial Intervention Installation, involves the fusion of curator and artist into a singular manifestation of two specific roles in the art world. Creating a disjunction and thus a new degree of innovation between these two traditional roles by combining them into one, everything in the installation is considered to question these roles and utilized this combination for maximum impact within the physical space (moad). Rendering curator, mode of display, installation, artwork and other multi media into one all encompassing experience.

Facebook event link: http://www.facebook.com/events/246653855492511/

FABIANO RODRIGUES SELF PORTRAITS

Fabiano Rodrigues is a Sao Paulo, Brazil – based photographer and ex-professional skateboarder. These photos are part of a series of self-portraits of himself skateboarding in architecturally beautiful locations, captured through a Hasselblad camera by remote control. The photos are all once-off prints, exploring the history and repertoire of skateboarding movements, particularly its relationship with the city, its architecture and urban furniture. In his choices of locations, there is a special interest for architectural landmarks, such as buildings designed by the renowned Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer. Fabiano is represented by the LOGO gallery in Sau Paulo, Brazil.