VERB BLANK CANVAS PROJECT // 1 COMPETITION

Verb DIY Deck

The Verb Blank Canvas Project // 1 is a chance for you to not only win R1500 worth of Verb product, but to get your artwork printed for an actual Verb deck graphic.

All you have to do is buy a Verb “DIY” Deck (pictured above) from your local skate shop, decorate it, take a photo, and email it to us. It is that easy.

Check out all the details here: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.726700777353951.1073741828.129458123744889&type=1

Entries for the Verb Blank Canvas Project // 1 Competition close 31 March, so get those entries in!

You can purchase the Verb “DIY” Deck from any Revolution store, and from Revolution Online.

Here are some other entries:

Verb DIY deck entry

Verb DIY deck entry

Verb DIY deck entry

Verb DIY deck entry

JUSTIN SOUTHEY INTERVIEW

Justin Southey Day Dreamer

Justin Southey is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I have always been secretly envious of the fact that Bruce Mackay got to do one in your last release, so I was very stocked when Verb approached me to do a board of my own.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I found a wife, and lost my spare time.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I happened to be overseas when I was asked to design a board, so it felt right to make a board about ocean adventures, the discovering of new lands and strange creatures, and of course the illusive search for hidden treasure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Great, I do the occasional drop of street art, so I am used to people trashing, stealing, and adding to my artwork.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I love doing work on different mediums and for different applications, so I am stoked to get the opportunity to try doing it for a skateboard.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Draw. Erase. Redraw. Save (& send).

Come see Justin’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Justin’s work:

Justin Southey Day Dreamers

Justin Southey In Your Head

Justin Southey Podium

Justin Southey Sexy Times

Justin Southey Mountain Retreat

Justin Southey Street Love

Hanno van Zyl Interview

Hanno van Zyl

For The AssemblyFor The Assembly. Brush and Ink.

Hanno van Zyl is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I grew up skateboarding; I have always been surrounded by skateboarders and I have always been influenced by skate culture. I think it has helped me to understand what the value of counter culture is and instilled me with a more questioning nature. It has always been a personal goal to design my own board graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

Hope.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to design something that specifically acknowledges the fact that it is on a skateboard. That would mean that it will get completely trashed after about two days of use. I wanted to take this into account and implicate the skater as part of the artwork. ‘Hot chicks’ were a stock-standard graphic option for skateboarding brands (think of the iconic Hook-ups brand) and was hugely popular when I was a teenage skater. I offer a slightly more honest and sinister look at this stylistic trademark and how it interacts with the idea of female objectification and the male gaze.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I tried to work that fact into the concept and made it an intrinsic part of the piece.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I don’t believe that a “normal canvas” exists. The medium is part of the message and I feel that every piece an artist does should be self-aware and critical of the space that it inhabits. The fact that I will essentially collaborate with a whole bunch of skaters to create unexpected new results is what excites me the most about this specific piece.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Search. Select. Interrogate. Adjust. Draw.

Come see Hanno’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Hanno’s work:

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For LarkFor Lark. Brush and digital.

DANIEL TING CHONG INTERVIEW

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Mag Icons

Daniel Ting Chong is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Doing a skateboard graphic has always been a “holy grail” project for me. When I was a little kid, I loved looking at the Birdhouse and Blind skateboard graphics. The colours were always saturated and clean; it really inspired me when I was younger to test out styles and linework. Since then I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic that was officially printed by a skate brand. So when I was asked by Verb to take this project on, I grabbed it with both hands.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost this amazing Ninja Turtles watch that had nunchucks for clock hands. One thing I did find worth mentioning was a stack of old Letraset packs.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I initially started with a completely different design to the one that is printed. I sketched out an idea of a boy and girl hugging each other on the edge of a mountain cliff. The pose was meant to be very dramatic with the boy holding the girl with her legs curled up behind her. The twist was that in each of their hands they had a knife pierced into each others back. Dramatic right? I liked it because it had the basic idea of lost & found, but with a dark undermining layer. On the morning of the deadline, I decided to change my design completely. I didn’t connect with the characters anymore and just didn’t like it. I then had a more graphic approach of creating intricate twists and curls out of ribbons which represent intersecting pathways. When you have a glance at it, your eye follows certain paths but gets confused by overlapping sections. You almost have to stop, look and navigate where you are again.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I really like that idea. It’s probably the most embracing thing that can happen to a design, where something totally out of your control changes your design in a organic way. Most of us nowadays design on a computer or sketch something out the way we want it to stay, but I think it is great that something created in a framed purpose can be totally broken and given a tangible path. It’s so boring when work only lives on the Internet, but now it has a chance to never be finished in a sense and always evolving.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

To reiterate some of my answers, I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic and this is my first attempt so it’s always exciting and fun. More importantly, I’m excited that my artwork will be traveling the streets, kissing curbs, rails and spinning around a lot. I think it’s probably the most fun any of my artwork will go through.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Thinking. Stressed. Creating. Re-Thinking. Happy.

Come see Daniel’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Daniel’s work:

Daniel Ting ChongStr.Crd Festival Brand Identity

Daniel Ting ChongNike AFCON Tournament

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Times Magazine

Daniel Ting ChongABSA Cityscape

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x RVCA Guitar Show

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x 2BOP

Daniel Ting ChongKidrobot Munny Custom

JACO HAASBROEK INTERVIEW

Jaco HaasbroekAcrylic & Ink on Paper. 148.5 mm x 210 mm.

Jaco Haasbroek is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I’ve always wanted to design a skateboard graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

As a kid I once picked up R20 at a fair and was really happy about it, thinking that I now had R40 to spend, only to realise that I had lost my R20.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I was thinking about the word ‘nowhere’ and how, when broken into two, it becomes ‘now’ & ‘here’. So it represents both being lost and found. I then applied this to the old saying “I’m in the middle of nowhere” which, when stated, is both a declaration of being lost, but also establishes a specific location – if that makes any sense. I then just turned the ‘H’ into a character, seeing as he is literally in the middle of nowhere.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I don’t mind. If people want to keep the artwork in tact they can hang it on a wall. It is, after all, a functional object and there’s something great about the artwork changing as it gets used.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It lends itself well to being a flat surface to print on, but also has some slight curves and this makes it sculptural. It seems to become an art object, as apposed to just another print.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Sketch. Trace. Colour. Save.

Come see Jaco’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jaco’s work:

Jaco HaasbroekPop It

Jaco HaasbroekSkating On Thin Ice

Cape Town

Jaco HaasbroekMike Stroud

Jaco HaasbroekThe i In TEAM

GERHARD HUMAN INTERVIEW

Gerhard Human Click Click Bang Bang

Gerhard Human is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Why not? Get my own personal deck AND exhibit with some rad people!

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost a Traser watch in Montagu 3 years ago. It was black and had orange bits on the numbers, in case if anyone finds it… I found R20 in my back pocket a while ago! That was great.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to do a design that you can spend time looking at; something that takes you away from the surroundings you’re used to and add a sense of adventure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Well, nothing stays beautiful forever. That’s the nature of life. Things deteriorate and from that comes new ideas. There’s a Buddhist practice of crafting an intricate mandala out of coloured sand, which takes hours, even days to complete. After it’s finished they destroy it and start all over again. It’s supposed to teach you about the impermanence of material things… I guess in that same way letting go of precious material things is therapeutic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

The exciting thing is the audience it will be exposed to. Doing a painting that hangs in a gallery is great but is often only seen by upperclass people who’re in the habit of buying art. Whereas, a skateboard will be used by people like me. People who LIVE a creative life.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Explore. Trance. Capture. Fixate. Trust.

Come see Gerhard’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Gerhard’s work:

Gerhard Human Forest

Gerhard Human Last Days of Billy The Kid

Gerhard Human Look At It

Gerhard Human Obscured by Clouds

Gerhard Human Safe From Harm

WILDCARD WEDNESDAYS

Wildcard Wednesday

TODAY ONLY

Get a Cliché Handwritten Deck for only R499,95 (was R599,95), and get a FREE copy of the Cliché Bon Voyage DVD, worth R199,95.

How it works:

1. Go here: http://revolutiononline.co.za/product-tag/wildcard-wednesday/
2. Choose your desired Cliché “Handwritten” deck.
3. Add it to your cart.
4. Go to your cart.
5. Put in “HANDWRITTEN” where it says ‘Apply Coupon’.
6. Watch the discount happen.
7. Checkout!

Easy! Get one before they’re gone.

*Please note: This special is ONLY available from www.revolutiononline.co.za, not our physical retail stores.*

WILDCARD WEDNESDAY

Wildcard Wednesdays

TODAY ONLY

Get the Enjoi Gang Bang deck in 8.1″ or 8.4″ for only R299,95!
Regular price is R499,95.

How it works:

1. Go here: http://revolutiononline.co.za/product-tag/gang-bang/
2. Choose your desired deck size
3. Add it to your cart
4. Go to your cart.
5. Put in “GANGBANG” where it says ‘Apply Coupon’.

Easy! Get one before they’re gone.

Please note: This special is ONLY available from www.revolutiononline.co.za, not our physical retail stores.

INTRODUCING ALMOST UBER LIGHT

Introducing the Almost “Uber Light”, the most technically advanced skateboard deck in the world.

Limited to 500 worldwide. In South Africa, the board is exclusively available from Revolution.

Deck inside a Deck: This was developed by Rodney Mullen and C.L Composites. After experimenting with many different layups, they arrived at a method using an actual deck within a deck. The internal carbon fiber foam deck is ultra light and nearly as stiff as metal. It acts like rebar, or a skeleton embodied by a standard 7-ply layup. It also vastly improved the lateral rigidity. The deck wears, slides, and looks like a normal 7-ply, but its lighter and has a supernatural pop last lasts far longer than any normal deck.

Balance is at the very heart of design in anything that spins, flips or flies. By reducing weight and adding rigidity (particularly laterally), the deck reacts more quickly to every movement while flipping faster and more precise.

Check out the Almost Uber Light Mullen on Revolution Online here: http://revolutiononline.co.za/product/almost-uber-light/

Almost Uber Light Tech Info
Almost Uber Light Mullen Chicken

Almost Uber Light Rodney Mullen

Almost Uber Light