Heroine & Group Photo Exhibition at The Pit

Tow Aways Group Photography Exhibition At The Pit

There is a group photography exhibition at a free performance by local band, Heroine, taking place at The Pit in Cape Town next week Thursday! Click on either of the photos to go to the Facebook event.

“Tow Aways” Zine Launch & Group Photography Exhibition

Lani Spice will be launching her photo zine “Tow Aways” showcasing analog work from some great local photographers. The “Tow Aways” exhibition consists of hundreds of photos from the many photographers who have been connected with The Pit and Clarke’s throughout the years. The exhibition will tell the story of the space, the people and what goes on in their lives beyond Bree Street.

Featuring: Black Koki, Ello Weezi, Suzy Snakes, Dewald Bruwer, Thys Lötter, Andrew Turpin, Jess James Harris, Danielle Clough, Laura Windvogel, Leon Bester, John Alex Second, Donovyn Le Roux, Justin Poulter, Thomas Pepler, Adriaan Louw, Juliette Raymer, Pauline Anne, Kent Lingenveld, Natalie Pereira, Anke Loots Alexia Webster and more…

Heroine at The Pit

RVCA x The Pit First Thursdays
133 Bree Street
5pm-7pm

Day to Night Exhibition

Day To Night Exhibition

DAY TO NIGHT
New work by Ello Weezi
RVCA First Thursdays
The Pit – 133 Bree Street
Thursday 3 April
5pm

Facebook event

yoyo.ello.tumblr.com

“DAY TO NIGHT” || NEW WORK BY ELLO from The Pit on Vimeo.

About Ello:

ELLO is the pseudonym of an artist from South Africa. Known for her collaborative work with Black Koki as Love and Hate Studio. Inspired by life, comics and animations amongst other things, her work is mostly character based with themes of memories, people, everyday experiences, current times and personal relevance.

FORMS: RODAN KANE HART EXHIBITION

Forms - Rodan Kane Hart Exhibition Poster

South African artist Rodan Kane Hart launched his exhibition last night. It’s on now at NIROXprojects, Arts on Main, Johannesburg. Go check it out!

FORMS / S | W
Rodan Kane Hart
12 March – 31 March 2014
NIROXprojects, 264 Fox Street, Arts on Main

NIROXprojects presents FORMS / S | W by Rodan Kane Hart. Following on from Structure, & Pattern Language (2013), Forms / S | W (2014) marks Hart’s third solo showcase in 2 ye­­­ars. The exhibition compromises an entirely new body of work consisting of sculpture, drawing, print & photography. These works follow on from previous points of enquiry regarding the constructed notion of the South African city. After a recent residency at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park in England, Hart has shifted his focus to more closely examining the influence of European architectural forms onto the urban fabric of South Africa.

RSVP to the Facebook event here.

Farshid Moussavi and Michael Kubo sum up the conceptual foundations of the exhibition as a whole in a book titled The Function of Ornament. A statement is made that succinctly deifies the relevance of architectural style and ornament, “Architecture needs mechanisms that allow it to become connected to culture”. Absorbing and capturing the forces that shape society achieve this cultural connection. These forces are then used as material components to work with, forming composite materiality. When two forces found within society, Invisible, meaning; Cultural, Political, and Temporal, and, Visible, meaning; Structural, Functional, and Physical, are brought together, it gives way to, a New Aesthetic Composition. Architectural style is not easily adjustable to the changes in culture and society. Modernists utilized transparency to represent architectural elements of space and structure; Post Modernists used Décor, whereas the Deconstructivists used geometrical collage to replace transparency all together. These concepts express the inextricable relationship between, Inside & Outside, Then & Now and Here & There.

Forms / S | W (S suggesting South = South Africa & W suggesting West = England) at NIROXprojects focuses on the formal influences of European Classism, Modernism and Post Modernism. An array of artistic medium has been utilized to present the historical and personal logic behind Hart’s formally abstracted works. Hart has intentionally incorporated more handcrafted methods with those of mechanical and digital processes, setting up a relationship between subject matter, time, theory and aesthetic. Works on display include…

Charcoal drawings & 35mm Black & White photographs inspired by architectural and natural forms found in the English cities of Manchester, Leeds, Liverpool & London, are presented alongside those depicting the South African cities of Johannesburg & Cape Town. These images explore the construction of spatial context by juxtaposing figurative representations with those of abstracted ones.

Being renowned for his life-sized steel sculptures Hart has taken a more intimate and crafted approach, by producing 4 smaller generative sculpture series consisting of 4 stages (each). Hart sees these sculptures as maquettes and studies for larger experiential projects, asserting the Russian Constructivists as an influence. Finally, a series of linocuts presenting the progression of line to shape and subsequently to form over 4 stages will also be on display.

OPEN HOURS: Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 4pm
NIROXprojects | 264 Fox Street | Arts on Main | MABONENG PRECINCT | Johannesburg CBD | +27 72 350 4326 | www.niroxarts.com

DEATH PEGASUS GROUP EXHIBITION

Death Pegasus Exhibition Poster

The Kalashnikovv Gallery is proud to present the group show for Death Pegasus’ new album entitled Critical Madness.

The exhibition is on right now at the gallery, so get down there and check it out!

The group show will consist of a curated show involving works by some fantastic up and coming and established local creative talent.

Love and Hate (Black Koki and Ello)
Leigh Lebotomy
The Pegasus Art Team
Koos Van Der Wat

RSVP to the Facebook Event

JIM HOUSER EXHIBITION

Jim Houser - A Position on a Map

Artist Jim Houser, from Philadelphia, has a solo show on in Italy at the moment called A Position on a Map. Here’s some of his work…

Jim Houser - A QuiverJim Houser / A Quiver / 2013 / acrylic and collage on canvas / 46×46 cm

Jim Houser - HushJim Houser / Hush / 2013 / acrylic and collage on wood / 46×46 cm

Jim Houser - PilesJim Houser / Piles / 2013 / acrylic and collage on canvas / 46×46 cm

Jim Houser - ParksJim Houser / Parks / 2013 / acrylic and collage on wood / 46×46 cm

Jim Houser - A Position on a MapJim Houser / A Position on a Map / 2013 / acrylic and collage on wood / 46×46 cm

Jim Houser - A Volley of OathsJim Houser / A Volley of Oaths / 2013 / acrylic on wood / 46×46 cm

The exhibition is on at Galleria Patricia Armocida. Jim has twenty medium and large-scale artworks and two site-specific installations up.

Jim Houser’s works are narrative microcosms in which he compulsively presents moments, instants, memories from his life as if it were a self-examination process, cathartically translating them into visual poetry with a pictorial, unique, and distinctive language. By cataloging his experiences and emotions, the artist creates his own vocabulary of images that guides us through his personal curative iconography. Jim Houser’s aesthetic combines stylized figures, hand-drawn typography, sound-symbolic words, visual sensations, and geometric shapes, creating quilt-like collages in a cohesive color palette. Houser layers acrylic on wood, fabric and found objects, blurring the lines between collage and sculpture. This deceptively dimensional quality is further highlighted when the pieces are assembled into one of the artist’s elaborate installations, adding to the complexity of each individual piece by emphasizing a greater inter-connectivity to the body of work as a whole. Once combined, it becomes clear that all of his works are associative and directly related, connected to each other as if part of a mapping system. And so, much like a position on a map corresponds to an actual physical location, his works mirror events, places, or attachments in his life, thus marking his position in the world.

Jim currently lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and is a self-taught artist and member of the art collective Space1026. He has exhibited all over the world.

All images Courtesy Galleria Patricia Armocida, Milano, Italy.

AWAY: AN EXHIBITION

Away

A Solo Exhibition of Recent Works
By artist Sarah Pratt
Titled ‘Away’

Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection, Cape Town
Wednesday 29 January – 22 February 2014

Toward or into non-existence.

While travelling from Cape Town to Dubai, Manchester to Wales, London to Singapore, and finally New Zealand back to Cape Town, Sarah Pratt presents a body of work both inspired and dictated by a ‘Journey’.

‘Away’ invokes feelings of being apart, elsewhere, afar and astray.

Travel exposes us to other worlds that, despite our scheduled timeline, seem to exist in a timeless realm.

While moving in a systematic manner from point to point, Sarah Pratt harnesses her travel experiences, both physical and psychological, to inform the nature of these works.

Using pen, ink and gouache, she focuses on producing a series of works that are an exploration of other-worldliness, works that illustrate another place and are created in unfamiliar environment.

Facebook event

Artwork by Sarah Pratt

Artwork by Sarah Pratt

THROWBACK THURSDAYS

SID: Superman is Dead

Dennis Morris and Shepard Fairey currently have an exhibition on called SID: SUPERMAN IS DEAD, which features paintings, prints and photographs of Sid Vicious, along with a life-size replica of a hotel room destroyed by Sid in 1977.

Sid Vicious

Sid Vicious

Shepard Fairey’s SUBLIMINAL PROJECTS will be transported back to 1977 Britain beginning 8 pm Friday, December 13 when Fairey and internationally renowned, British photographer Dennis Morris host the opening of SID: Superman Is Dead. The show will feature collaborative paintings, photographs and prints of, and inspired by, Sid Vicious’ tenure as the Sex Pistols’ bassist.

Born John Simon Ritchie, Vicious’ time with the Pistols was as brief as it was chaotic and legendary. Since his death in early 1979 at the age of 21, Sid has been immortalized as a punk rock icon in countless posthumous recordings, films, T-shirts, action figures etc. SID: Superman Is Dead is possibly the ultimate of these tributes, its centerpiece being a recreation of a hotel room trashed by Sid in a fit of intoxication, rage and depression during the infamous S.P.O.T.S. (Sex Pistols On Tour Secretly) tour of 1977, during which the Pistols were forced to play every date under pseudonyms to avoid cancellation.

The SID: Superman Is Dead opening reception will also feature a once in a lifetime live musical homage to Sid in the form of Ritchie Love, an exclusive assemblage of his contemporaries from the original punk rock era. The band is comprised of Sex Pistols guitarist, co-founder and Vicious band mate Steve Jones; Generation X co-founder Billy Idol, who ran with early Pistols support gang the Bromley Contingent; Bow Wow Wow co-founder and early Adam & The Ants guitarist Leigh Gorman; and Blondie co-founder and erstwhile Ramones and Iggy Pop drummer Clem Burke.

The Sex Pistols changed my life when I discovered them in 1984. Their music alone made my arm hairs stand up, but their image and attitude were just as important and powerful. The member of the Sex Pistols who I was drawn to and most epitomized the punk image for me was Sid Vicious, with his spiked hair, leather jacket, lock necklace, and reckless behavior. At 14 I was mesmerized by Sid and made my first homemade t-shirt of him snarling his lip defiantly. I was rebelling, looking for any way to irritate my parents and, before I knew better, Sid was my Superman. Sid self-destructed young and with punk’s slogans like “No Future” and “Live Fast, Die Young,” Sid was everything the Superman, anti-hero, or cliché of a nihilistic movement called for. Sid didn’t really do much to shape punk music… he only actually played on two songs on Never Mind the Bollocks Here’s The Sex Pistols. However, Sid’s surly vocals kick ass on C’mon Everybody, Somethin’ Else, and My Way. Sid remains one of punk’s most enduring icons even if he is a classic example of style over substance. I was a sucker for Sid’s image as a teenager, and I still am, even though I see him as less “cool” and more tragic and cautionary these days. I have made many images of Sid over the years, and I thought I had retired him as a subject until Dennis Morris – the photographer of the most intimate and iconic shots of Sid-approached me about a collaboration. Dennis’s archive provided an amazing treasure trove of Sid images to work from in creating the paintings and prints in the “Superman Is Dead” show. I’m so glad I got to do Dennis’s Sid images “My Way”! I can now retire Sid as a subject. I’ve worked with the best, I can skip the rest.” – Shepard Fairey

Working from the title, S.I.D (Superman is Dead), these photographs sum up/represent the image Sid portrayed of himself to the public. He was hero, villain, fearless, innocent and like a supernova, he shone bright, lived fast, died young. Punk needed a hero, Sid became that hero / anti-hero. The idea for the exhibition came from a mutual admiration and respect of each other’s work (for Shepard and I). When Shepard and I eventually met, the exhibition was born on that first meeting. It had to happen. And a happening it will be!” – Dennis Morris

LOST/FOUND EXHIBITION PHOTO GALLERY

lost found Exhibition

The lost/found Exhibition took place at Revolution Woodstock last week Thursday. It was a huge success. Not only were there some incredible artworks exhibited, but it was also the launch of the Verb Artist Series decks by artists Daniel Ting Chong, Justin Southey, Hanno van Zyl, Jade Klara, Jaco Haasbroek and Gerhard Human. The Kraken Rum kept the social juices flowing, and Roastin’ Records kept everyone stoked with their DJing. Milkshed, the non-profit that a portion of proceeds from the exhibition will go to, were there as well, and displayed some beautiful furniture made from reclaimed wood; a children’s bicycle, a small set of table and chairs, a lamp, and some rad stationary holders for your desk. We also put out one of the new Verb DIY decks and let people draw on it. The exhibition was packed, art was appreciated and sold, and everyone had a good time.

Thanks so much to everyone who came to the exhibition opening last night! A special thanks to Simon and Candice for curating, The Kraken Rum, Roastin’ Records, Milkshed, the artists that exhibited their work, and the artists who collaborated with Verb for the Artists Series skateboard decks. We are really proud of the series.

The exhibition is still running for another week, so feel free to drop by anytime (when we’re open obviously) and browse the art.

Revolution Woodstock Exchange, Cape Town: (021) 447 6801 / woodstock@revolution.co.za

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lost found Exhibition

LOST/FOUND EXHIBITION OPENS TONIGHT

lost found exhibition

Revolution presents:

lost / found

Verb 2013 Artist Series Range Launch
&
lost/found: an exhibition of exploration

Verb Artist Skateboard Range 2013:
Daniel Ting Chong
Gerard Human
Hanno Van Zyl
Jade Klara
Justin Southey
Jaco Haasbroek

And artists:
Paul Senyol
Simon Berndt
Jason de Villiers
Dani Loureiro
Ninja Bread Boy
Motel 7
Justin Poulter
Cassandra Johnson
Nicola De Jager
Matthew Oldfield
Candice Jezek aka Z
Chris Valentine
Michael Dos Ramos

DJ’s on vinyl from Roastin’ Records

Cash bar

Opening:
28 November 2013
7 – 10pm

Good to know:
A portion of proceeds from the evening will go to Milkshed; a not-for-profit business that uses reclaimed wood to create furniture and rebuild schools.

Revolution, The Woodstock Exchange, 66 Albert Road, Woodstock

021 447 6801

Verb | ROASTIN’ RECORDS – Cape Town | Revolution | The Kraken Rum | Milkshed

REDOK: A SOLO EXHIBITION BY DALEAST

Redok a Solo Exhibition by DALeast

South African artist, DALeast, has a solo exhibition on at the moment, called REDOK, on at The Outsiders Gallery in Newcastle, England.

The most exciting young artist on the global stage graces Tyneside this winter.

DALeast’s solo exhibition REDOK – a Tibetan phrase meaning “hope and fear” – features animal paintings in traditional portrait formats, taking inspiration from commissioned works of the early modern era. The portraits are painted in the artist’s distinctive, inspiring style. They include the tea-stained backgrounds, which he lovingly builds over many months, that feature on many of his bravura gallery pieces.

REDOK also includes study sketches, a video installation, and two limited edition etchings created by the artist at our Execution Dock print studio, titled Circulated Dawn and Circulated Dusk, each from a signed and numbered edition of 50, measuring 62.5cm x 50cm, and priced at £225.

The etchings will first be made available to those attending the exhibition preview at The Outsiders Newcastle, which takes place from 6pm until 9pm on Thursday the 21st of November, at which sales will be strictly limited to a maximum of one of each of the two editions per person per household. There will be no exceptions to this, and no pre-orders taken for those unable to attend the exhibition in person.

Any remaining editions will be made available to purchase online from The Outsiders website the following day, Friday 22nd of November, at 4pm UK time.

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

DALeast

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NATIVE NOSTALGIA EXHIBITION

Native Nostalgia

Native Nostalgia

On now!

Venue: The Museum of African Design
Address: 281 Commissioner Street, Johannesburg

Native Nostalgia
by Aaron Kohn

This exhibition tells the stories of bygone eras by positioning them firmly within present day narratives. Through architecture, construction, cartography, photography, communal archives, and historical reenactment, each artist and participant has a conversation with a past though which they did not live by juxtaposing the design elements of the past with those of today.

The exhibition title comes from Jacob Dlamini’s 2009 Native Nostalgia, in which he probes the ethical justification for fond memories of a childhood in a South African township. How, he asks, can a black South African can reflect on something so deplorable with nostalgia? The works in this show represent a related form of nostalgia: the nostalgia for a troubled time through which one did not live.

For example, Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou reflects on the narrative of Benin’s capital, Porto Novo, through the traditional role of women, ceremonial masks, and the Aguda architectural style largely brought back from Brazil by slaves who were deported from there after the early-1800s slave revolts. The designs in the women’s fabrics and masks, as well as the topless dress, contrast with the peeling paint and ornate Portuguese-style woodwork. On top of that, the portraiture itself is unquestionably contemporary.

Meanwhile, I See A Different You’s 19[ ] Mercedes [MODEL] is parked in the middle of the gallery, a physical specimen of design that the duo drive in their everyday life. Rather than bask in the glory of contemporary vehicular stylings, I See a Different You lives with one foot firmly planted in the political and [artistic/creative/design] past. Their other foot allows their work to depict similar contemporary appropriations of historical design elements.

These juxtapositions are reflective of a broader trend toward nostalgia. For South Africans in their early twenties and younger, South Africa is defined more by the post-1994 intersection of Mandela-style reconciliation and rapid globalization than it is by the struggle against Apartheid. Perhaps because they did not live through the darker days of Apartheid, twenty-somethings buy domestic worker outfits for parties and listen to house music alongside older Marabi jazz.

The works in this exhibition display the deep complexity of Native Nostalgia.

There is also multi media spatial intervention by the Kalashnikovv Gallery and Cuss ZA.

Cuss Artist Statement – INDODA
Creative Direction – Mina Lundgren x Ravi Govender
Performance – Simiso Zwane
Music – Zamani Xolo x Simiso Zwane

This collaboration between Swedish designer Mina Lundgren and myself Ravi Govender see’s us focussing on the Kanga textile and its graphic motifs with reference to its place in Zulu culture. The Khanga itself has been appropriated by diviners across South Africa as part of their dress code, and has strong varied meaning as a result. Themes from Zulu culture, such as strength and masculinity, power and the introduction of the false prophet into contemporary culture are also focussed on. The idea was to create a costume for a character that embodies these features. To aesthetically personify mysticism that is present in an expression that is current to africa. It is to also bridge the gap between international representation, with the creation of a fashion video installation. For this, the technique of green screen is incorporated to enhance the visual
aesthetic of movement and work with the idea of lo-fi video production across the continent.

Kalashnikovv Gallery Statement

The Cuss x Kalashnikovv Gallery Spatial Intervention Installation, involves the fusion of curator and artist into a singular manifestation of two specific roles in the art world. Creating a disjunction and thus a new degree of innovation between these two traditional roles by combining them into one, everything in the installation is considered to question these roles and utilized this combination for maximum impact within the physical space (moad). Rendering curator, mode of display, installation, artwork and other multi media into one all encompassing experience.

Facebook event link: http://www.facebook.com/events/246653855492511/

JUSTIN SOUTHEY INTERVIEW

Justin Southey Day Dreamer

Justin Southey is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I have always been secretly envious of the fact that Bruce Mackay got to do one in your last release, so I was very stocked when Verb approached me to do a board of my own.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I found a wife, and lost my spare time.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I happened to be overseas when I was asked to design a board, so it felt right to make a board about ocean adventures, the discovering of new lands and strange creatures, and of course the illusive search for hidden treasure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Great, I do the occasional drop of street art, so I am used to people trashing, stealing, and adding to my artwork.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I love doing work on different mediums and for different applications, so I am stoked to get the opportunity to try doing it for a skateboard.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Draw. Erase. Redraw. Save (& send).

Come see Justin’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Justin’s work:

Justin Southey Day Dreamers

Justin Southey In Your Head

Justin Southey Podium

Justin Southey Sexy Times

Justin Southey Mountain Retreat

Justin Southey Street Love

Hanno van Zyl Interview

Hanno van Zyl

For The AssemblyFor The Assembly. Brush and Ink.

Hanno van Zyl is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I grew up skateboarding; I have always been surrounded by skateboarders and I have always been influenced by skate culture. I think it has helped me to understand what the value of counter culture is and instilled me with a more questioning nature. It has always been a personal goal to design my own board graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

Hope.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to design something that specifically acknowledges the fact that it is on a skateboard. That would mean that it will get completely trashed after about two days of use. I wanted to take this into account and implicate the skater as part of the artwork. ‘Hot chicks’ were a stock-standard graphic option for skateboarding brands (think of the iconic Hook-ups brand) and was hugely popular when I was a teenage skater. I offer a slightly more honest and sinister look at this stylistic trademark and how it interacts with the idea of female objectification and the male gaze.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I tried to work that fact into the concept and made it an intrinsic part of the piece.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I don’t believe that a “normal canvas” exists. The medium is part of the message and I feel that every piece an artist does should be self-aware and critical of the space that it inhabits. The fact that I will essentially collaborate with a whole bunch of skaters to create unexpected new results is what excites me the most about this specific piece.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Search. Select. Interrogate. Adjust. Draw.

Come see Hanno’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Hanno’s work:

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For LarkFor Lark. Brush and digital.

DANIEL TING CHONG INTERVIEW

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Mag Icons

Daniel Ting Chong is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Doing a skateboard graphic has always been a “holy grail” project for me. When I was a little kid, I loved looking at the Birdhouse and Blind skateboard graphics. The colours were always saturated and clean; it really inspired me when I was younger to test out styles and linework. Since then I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic that was officially printed by a skate brand. So when I was asked by Verb to take this project on, I grabbed it with both hands.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost this amazing Ninja Turtles watch that had nunchucks for clock hands. One thing I did find worth mentioning was a stack of old Letraset packs.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I initially started with a completely different design to the one that is printed. I sketched out an idea of a boy and girl hugging each other on the edge of a mountain cliff. The pose was meant to be very dramatic with the boy holding the girl with her legs curled up behind her. The twist was that in each of their hands they had a knife pierced into each others back. Dramatic right? I liked it because it had the basic idea of lost & found, but with a dark undermining layer. On the morning of the deadline, I decided to change my design completely. I didn’t connect with the characters anymore and just didn’t like it. I then had a more graphic approach of creating intricate twists and curls out of ribbons which represent intersecting pathways. When you have a glance at it, your eye follows certain paths but gets confused by overlapping sections. You almost have to stop, look and navigate where you are again.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I really like that idea. It’s probably the most embracing thing that can happen to a design, where something totally out of your control changes your design in a organic way. Most of us nowadays design on a computer or sketch something out the way we want it to stay, but I think it is great that something created in a framed purpose can be totally broken and given a tangible path. It’s so boring when work only lives on the Internet, but now it has a chance to never be finished in a sense and always evolving.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

To reiterate some of my answers, I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic and this is my first attempt so it’s always exciting and fun. More importantly, I’m excited that my artwork will be traveling the streets, kissing curbs, rails and spinning around a lot. I think it’s probably the most fun any of my artwork will go through.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Thinking. Stressed. Creating. Re-Thinking. Happy.

Come see Daniel’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Daniel’s work:

Daniel Ting ChongStr.Crd Festival Brand Identity

Daniel Ting ChongNike AFCON Tournament

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Times Magazine

Daniel Ting ChongABSA Cityscape

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x RVCA Guitar Show

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x 2BOP

Daniel Ting ChongKidrobot Munny Custom

JACO HAASBROEK INTERVIEW

Jaco HaasbroekAcrylic & Ink on Paper. 148.5 mm x 210 mm.

Jaco Haasbroek is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I’ve always wanted to design a skateboard graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

As a kid I once picked up R20 at a fair and was really happy about it, thinking that I now had R40 to spend, only to realise that I had lost my R20.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I was thinking about the word ‘nowhere’ and how, when broken into two, it becomes ‘now’ & ‘here’. So it represents both being lost and found. I then applied this to the old saying “I’m in the middle of nowhere” which, when stated, is both a declaration of being lost, but also establishes a specific location – if that makes any sense. I then just turned the ‘H’ into a character, seeing as he is literally in the middle of nowhere.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I don’t mind. If people want to keep the artwork in tact they can hang it on a wall. It is, after all, a functional object and there’s something great about the artwork changing as it gets used.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It lends itself well to being a flat surface to print on, but also has some slight curves and this makes it sculptural. It seems to become an art object, as apposed to just another print.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Sketch. Trace. Colour. Save.

Come see Jaco’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jaco’s work:

Jaco HaasbroekPop It

Jaco HaasbroekSkating On Thin Ice

Cape Town

Jaco HaasbroekMike Stroud

Jaco HaasbroekThe i In TEAM

GERHARD HUMAN INTERVIEW

Gerhard Human Click Click Bang Bang

Gerhard Human is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Why not? Get my own personal deck AND exhibit with some rad people!

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost a Traser watch in Montagu 3 years ago. It was black and had orange bits on the numbers, in case if anyone finds it… I found R20 in my back pocket a while ago! That was great.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to do a design that you can spend time looking at; something that takes you away from the surroundings you’re used to and add a sense of adventure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Well, nothing stays beautiful forever. That’s the nature of life. Things deteriorate and from that comes new ideas. There’s a Buddhist practice of crafting an intricate mandala out of coloured sand, which takes hours, even days to complete. After it’s finished they destroy it and start all over again. It’s supposed to teach you about the impermanence of material things… I guess in that same way letting go of precious material things is therapeutic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

The exciting thing is the audience it will be exposed to. Doing a painting that hangs in a gallery is great but is often only seen by upperclass people who’re in the habit of buying art. Whereas, a skateboard will be used by people like me. People who LIVE a creative life.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Explore. Trance. Capture. Fixate. Trust.

Come see Gerhard’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Gerhard’s work:

Gerhard Human Forest

Gerhard Human Last Days of Billy The Kid

Gerhard Human Look At It

Gerhard Human Obscured by Clouds

Gerhard Human Safe From Harm

JADE KLARA INTERVIEW

Coral Girl - Jade Klara

Jade Klara is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. She is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with her to chat about her graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I had a board when I was 8; an old 80’s shape with a bright pink mutant rat graphic. I was in love. I have always wanted to do a skate graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I once found a 5 leaf clover, but I was very young and bad at maths so you never know. I lose my brushes all the time but I find them holding my hair up.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

When I thought of lost & found I thought of ancient treasure, of heaps of gold and rubies hiding in an undiscovered cave. I was then really intrigued by a genie’s lamp, but instead of a typical genie I wanted something more animalistic, so the wolf genie was born. I kept the scene quite dark and ghostly and then used metallic gold as a reference to lost treasure and magic.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I like that it has a lifespan. Ephemeral things are more poetic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It’s great that this canvas has a purpose. It gets to move and break and see the world.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Growl, draw, make-a-wolf-face-for-reference, draw, exhale.

Come see Jade’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jade’s work:

Nest - Jade Klara

Bind - Jade Klara

Ghost Sloth - Jade Klara

Ghost Sloth - Jade Klara

Sloth Poster - Jade Klara

Lost - Jade Klara

LOST / FOUND EXHIBITION

lost found exhibition

Revolution presents:

lost / found

Verb 2013 Artist Series Range Launch
&
lost/found: an exhibition of exploration

Verb Artist Skateboard Range 2013:
Daniel Ting Chong
Gerard Human
Hanno Van Zyl
Jade Klara
Justin Southey
Jaco Haasbroek

And artists:
Paul Senyol
Simon Berndt
Jason de Villiers
Dani Loureiro
Ninja Bread Boy
Motel 7
Justin Poulter
Cassandra Johnson
Nicola De Jager
Matthew Oldfield
Candice Jezek aka Z
Chris Valentine
Michael Dos Ramos

DJ’s on vinyl from Roastin’ Records

Cash bar

Opening:
28 November 2013
7 – 10pm

Good to know:
A portion of proceeds from the evening will go to Milkshed; a not-for-profit business that uses reclaimed wood to create furniture and rebuild schools.

Revolution, The Woodstock Exchange, 66 Albert Road, Woodstock

021 447 6801

Verb | ROASTIN’ RECORDS – Cape Town | Revolution | The Kraken Rum | Milkshed

PAUL SENYOL INTERVIEW

Letters to Lotte – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 905mm x 635mm – framed

A Vacant Passage opens this weekend, so we caught up with artist Paul Senyol to talk to him about it…

Tell us about A Vacant Passage, your exhibition this weekend with Andrzej Urbanski.
It is a two person show, opening on Saturday at Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection. Andrzej and I met about a year and a half ago for the first time. We have since become close friends and, during this time, have discovered many similarities in our approach to work and life, as well as our past. The exhibition is an exploration along these themes.

How did you guys meet? What made you decide to work on an exhibition and collaborate on some work together?
I heard that Andrzej was at /A WORD OF ART AIR (Artist In Residence) programme, and one day I passed by him while cycling down the street. At the time he was busy painting a wall. I waved, shouted “nice wall” and carried on riding. A few days later we met again while walking down the street. We exchanged numbers, and when AJ returned a few months later, we started to hang out a bit more. We both enjoy each others’ work, and we had an idea to do some collaborative walls and art pieces. Monique at Salon91 and myself were planning exhibitions and shows for myself in January this year, and we decided to do a two person show in October. I suggested AJ as the other artist whom I most wanted to work with.

Charlotte – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 930mm x 795mm – framed

What do you think influences your personal style to be more abstract than ‘straight forward’, if I can say that?
I like to play with line and colour, and create things that are a bit more allusive and are able to draw a viewer in, as well as engage with a person as they start to make sense of a piece and interpret it for themselves. I believe that in painting there needs to be a fair bit of interpretation allowed on the viewers behalf. I like to engage with the viewer’s imagination.

The press release for the exhibition mentioned that “To the artists, Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa too might become a vacant place.” What is a ‘vacant’ place?
Through our time researching and creating works for the exhibition, we came across so many old photos of places, people and things that no longer exist but, if you showed one of these photos to my Dad for instance, it would bring back a memory of something that perhaps no longer exists. As people, we travel to and from places, leave things behind, take things with us, make friends etc., but at the end of the day, we cannot take a place with us. In essence, the place becomes vacant when we leave, but it remains in our minds and in our hearts. Germany and Poland became vacant for our families because, for various reasons, they were forced to move. It has been fascinating to me exploring these places via photos, letters and diaries from my grandparents.

Pretoria Castle – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 485mm x 460mm – framed

What made you decide to integrate computer software and technologies into the exhibition? How has it been integrated?
A friend of Monique’s, Johan, approached us with this concept of showing work in a new way, via digital means. What excited AJ and myself was that it would allow us to show work in a physical space, but bring the viewer into contact with all the history and source we had used in a non-tangible digital space. We are now able to elaborate on these ‘vacant passages’ through which our families and ourselves have travelled.

What do you hope that people get out of viewing the exhibition?
I hope people are inspired by the works we have created, and that they realise that each day they have the opportunity to continue writing a history story of their own; that through the exhibition they realise the importance of friendships and family. These archived photos, letters and documents from my grandparents are fascinating for their history, but also how they shape my identity and sense of place in this world. We all leave a legacy of some form, and I hope that people are inspired to leave behind a positive trace of themselves as they travel through their lifetime.

What does the future have in store for Paul Senyol?
A few more art shows locally this year and a short residency in Germany halfway through 2014. After the opening on Saturday I would like to take a few days off to plot some ideas for upcoming shows and projects.

Any last words?
The show opens on Saturday at 11h00. We will have some sweet ice cream, as well as be making a braai. Come on down and say hi, hang out, and enjoy the opening with us.

A Vacant Passage Invite from Monique du Preez on Vimeo.

A VACANT PASSAGE EXHIBITION

A Vacant Passage Introduction from Digital Narrative on Vimeo.

A two-person exhibition by Paul Senyol & Andrzej Urbanski presented by Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection

There is a beautiful synergy that exists between Paul Senyol & Andrzej Urbanski’s paintings. A VACANT PASSAGE is the story of two artists traveling and leaving behind remnants and legacies, told and expressed through powerful & uniquely abstracted artworks. Andrzej Urbanski [Pol/Ger] and Paul Senyol [Zar] first met during Urbanski’s residency in Cape Town in June of 2012. Soon they began to discover the many similarities, which exist across their individual artistic practices and approaches, even though the execution of their work differs radically.

A VACANT PASSAGE presents an all-new body of work from Urbanski and Senyol respectively, as well as some collaborative pieces, all of which relate to their history and the common happenings of the years when both artists’ families experienced the repercussions of The Second World War. The works on exhibition reference a time and a place, which no longer exist. Both artists having experienced this particular location in a different context, come together to seek out and construct a narrative from the puzzle pieces of a past, which neither has any actual recollection of, other than a shoebox filled with photos, newspaper clippings, essays as well as stories handed down from generation to generation. To the artists, Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa too might become a vacant place.

While the subject matter may seem very specific, the works carry a truly universal message. The exhibition will feature a unique AUGMENTED REALITY aspect, which will further enhance the level of accessibility, as well as the viewer’s experience of the exhibition by means of user-friendly computer software & technologies. Visitors will be able to download the software to devices such as Smartphones & Ipads to enjoy an enhanced experience, which will offer further insight into the artists, their stories and the works on show. The exhibition flyer, the shopfront and the artworks will be layered with interactive digital content. Viewers can expect to see medium to large-scale paintings varying from monochrome black and white, to beautiful hues of colour on paper and on canvas, as well as a number of collaborative works.

ANDRZEJ URBANSKI | ARTISTS PROFILE

Andrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski (Born 1983) is a German visual artist of Polish ancestry, currently residing in Cape Town. Andrzej’s early artistic background has developed and evolved over the course of 16 years spent painting, creating sculptures, being involved in several art projects, exhibitions and teaching positions around the globe. The artist holds a Masters Degree in Fine Arts, attained during 2012 from the EAE (European Art Ensemble) at the ECAL (University of Art & Design) in Lausanne, Switzerland and a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Design/Graphic Design from BTK-FH in Berlin since 2010. In June of 2012 Andrzej completed a residency at /A WORD OF ART as a part of his studies. The mandate for the EAE program states that students must engage in dialogue with foreign scholars and institutions, holding at its core the need for interpersonal connection and foreign travel to gather experience and exchange ideas between art professionals, educators, and students. Aside from his finished thesis research, Andrzej is interested in exploring the process of creating work in different social environments around the globe, drawing influence and inspiration from architecture, landscape, photography, design elements and media/advertising & of course from the other artists he encounters on his journey. His main artistic focus is on human social behaviour and learned or innate reactions to varying shapes and colours.

PAUL SENYOL | ARTISTS PROFILE

Paul Senyol

Paul Senyol was born on the 25th of October 1980 in Cape Town, South Africa. Paul has been drawing and painting since his early high school years, however never pursuing any form of artistic or graphic training. At age sixteen, he discovered the freedom of skateboarding and punk rock music in the beautiful suburb of Welgemoed, where he grew up. This naturally became a key influence in his early drawings, sketches and paintings, while skateboard graphics, album covers, magazine layouts and illustrations played a role in developing his aesthetic eye. Around the same time, he also became exposed to the creativity of graffiti and street artists such as Marc Gonzales, Ed Templeton, and Barry McGee – all of this forming part of his early art education. A few years later Paul was introduced to and moved by the creative thought and artistic genius of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol, and Cy Twombly respectively. Senyol’s lack of formal training and schooling has given him the freedom to break away from traditional notions of painting, to explore genres and styles, and to meld mediums, allowing him a creative freedom that flows so evidently through his work. Senyol’s art lingers gracefully and intentionally between beauty and honesty and brings a surreal, yet abstract world into being. His current work focuses heavily on narrative, shape, line, form, composition, colour & texture. Each faint line, bold brushstroke and shape is carefully composed to breathe life into its environment, reflecting something of light, serenity, experience and thought. His finished work seeks to engage the viewer through translating his own experiences to canvas, allowing an open discussion and translation of his work. Senyol has exhibited extensively throughout South Africa and abroad. This year Paul has been nominated as a finalist to the Absa Atelier Competition 2013. He currently works from a studio in Woodstock, Cape Town.

Paul Senyol A Boy's DreamPaul Senyol – A Boy’s Dream

Andrzej Urbanski ArtAndrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski ArtAndrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski ArtAndrzej Urbanski

Paul Senyol GretschensheimPaul Senyol – Gretschensheim

Paul Senyol To FinlandiaPaul Senyol – To Finlandia

Opening Event: Daytime Opening, Saturday 21 Sept from 11h00 till late! Show concludes 12 Oct at 14h00.

THE WITCHING HOUR EXHIBITION

Candice JežekCandice Ježek. Caught a Glimpse. Acrylic on Fabriano.

THE WITCHING HOUR

Jade Klara & Candice Ježek [aka Ž]

16 October – 9 November 2013

WEDNESDAY EVENING 16 October 2013 at 18h30

The Witching Hour is an exploration of the magical and secret spaces of the world. Artists Candice Ježek and Jade Klara use a whimsical and powerfully feminine style to create rich narratives of unexpected yet somehow familiar themes. Expressed through various mediums of painting, sculpture, and print, they aim to move the viewer to a place of both sweetness and sorrow. The witching hour is a visually stimulating, diverse and powerful showing of the reflections of these two artists’ lives.

Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection

Opening Event: Evening Opening 16 October at 18h30pm.

The show will conclude 9 November at 14h00.

Facebook event link: www.facebook.com/events/192687710912514/

Gallery Hours: Tue – Fri: 10 am – 6pm; Sat: 10am – 2pm; Closed: Mondays & Sundays
Address: 91 Kloof Street, Cape Town
Email: info@salon91.co.za
Contact Numbers: 021-424-6930 / 082-679-3906
Website: www.salon91.co.za
For further information & high res / more images of the artworks please contact the gallery director & curator, Monique at info@salon91.co.za / salon91.art@gmail.com

Candice JežekCandice Ježek. When You Find It Hold It Near. Acrylic on Fabriano.

Jade KlaraJade Klara. Coral Girl

Jade KlaraJade Klara. Wolf Heart

Jade and CandiceJade Klara and Candice Ježek

LOOK EXHIBITION

New and older works by Black Koki, Ello Xray, Jean de Wet, John Second, Justin Southey, Lorcan White, Linsey Levendal, Michael Saal, Michael Tymbios, Nagkakao, Paul Senyol, Rooiwolf.

Acoustic set by Black Lung.

Thursday 22 August
18:00 – 22:00
“Side Street Studios”
32 William street Woodstock

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/events/485331711557535/

FORMER MOUNTAINS EXHIBITION

Bruce MackayBruce Mackay – Crown 1

A group show by Bruce Mackay, Dale Lawrence, Jean de Wet and Mike Tymbios, presented by Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection.

28 August – 18 September 2013

Former Mountains‘ is an exhibition, which is predominantly centered around the art and medium of drawing and to some extent print. The artists have been selected to exhibit together based on a strong narrative quality, which is common to their individual practices, as well as for a unique & highly individualistic quality of line which is both present and signature to each of their styles. The artists have each taken a unique approach to the subject of ‘Former Mountains‘, some presenting a number of diverse interpretations of the theme which will be depicted as smaller individual series within their greater body of work, while the other exhibiting artists have taken a more singular approach, ranging from the very literal to far-off poetic and obscure expressions.

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/events/442921912481359/

D Lawrence Object to Inspire AweDale Lawrence – Object to Inspire

Jean De Wet ApartmentJean de Wet – Apartment

Michael Tymbios Ghost Mountain PassMichael Tymbios – Ghost Mountain Pass

A VACANT PASSAGE EXHIBITION

Paul Senyol

Artists Paul Senyol and Andrzej Urbanski have an upcoming exhibition called ‘A Vacant Passage’ at Salon91 in Cape Town.

The past is often a source of inspiration within working practice amongst artists, but how about when two artists meet by chance and share a common heritage and history? Andrzej Urbanski(Pol/Ger) and Paul Senyol first met in Cape Town, during Urbanski’s three month residency early in 2012. There was an immediate connection between the two, and upon Urbanski’s return later in 2012 they began spending more time together exchanging ideas, thoughts and concepts. They quickly began to discover many similarities within their artistic practice and approaches, even though their execution differed greatly. A common visual language, yet different dialects. Up until that time each artist had been writing their own story, looking back, but also looking forward. Uncovering their past they found similar backgrounds, heritage, influences, and commonalities between their families. Both families having lived within a 200km radius of one other. Much of their lives changed at the beginning of the second world war when both families were forced to give up their homeland and way of life. Common roots yet a shared experience of displacement and loss. A vacant passage. For the exhibition the artists reference back to a time and place which no longer exists, both artists having experienced this space and place, and now coming together to seek out and make a story of a puzzle and a past which neither has any recollection of, besides a shoebox of photos, newspaper clippings, essays as well as stories handed down from generation to generation.

To the artists’ Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa might become a vacant place. The story of two artists traveling and leaving behind remnants and legacies. The artists will each produce a body of new works related to their history and the common happenings of the years when both artists’ families experienced the difficulties and repercussions of the 2nd World War.

For the exhibition the artists will also collaborate on several artworks as well as a mural within the gallery.

Andrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski

Andrzej Urbanski

#WHILEYOUWEREHUSTLING EXHIBITION

#whileyouwerehustling is an exhibition by Bryan Little and Conn Bertish. These are some photos by Lúcia Pinto of the opening night.

Exploring themes of evolution, gentrification, obsessive quests, misfits and outsiders. A process orientated body of work that seeks to unravel notions of progress. Where do we take our guidance from, and where are we going?

The exhibition opened on Thursday 18 July, and is currently showing at /A WORD OF ART gallery in the Woodstock Exchange, Cape Town.

To find out more, visit the Facebook event here: http://www.facebook.com/events/171696109675503/

GONZ EXHIBITION

Gonz_15Year_OnlineFlyer_Final

If you’re in Joburg, get down to Area3 for the Gonz exhibition.

It opened on Saturday and runs until 31 July.

JERRY HSU PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION

Jerry Hsu is opening a photography exhibition at the Family Bookstore on Fairfax, Los Angeles. The show is called The Observable Universe. These are a few sneak peaks.

ABSTRACT STORIES EXHIBITION PHOTOS

Abstract Stories

Last night was the opening of “Abstract Stories”, the latest art exhibition at A Word of Art in Cape Town. The exhibition features: Paul Senyol (CT), Black Koki (CT), Ello (CT), Freddy Sam (CT), AEC Interesni Kazki (Ukraine), Remed (Madrid), 108 (Italy), Ever (Beunos Aires), Andrzej Urbanski (Berlin), Overunder (Reno, Nevada), Joao Lelo (Brazil), Ree Treweek (CT), Jaz (Beunos Aires), Linsey Levendall (Canada), Lxone (France), and Jean de Wet (CT). The exhibition runs from 30 May to 14 July. We went to check it out, and were super impressed with the work on display. If you can get down to the Woodstock Exchange, it is well worth your time to spend an hour or two browsing the gallery.

“Abstract stories is a collaborative exhibition by renowned local and international artists. Each artist has a story to tell and gives an abstract depiction of life as seen through his eyes. The exhibition explores each artist’s individual creative expression and style.”

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Abstract Stories

Click on the image below to see the event on Facebook: