Favourite Fives with Byron Rhoda

Byron Rhoda

Favourite Fives is a new feature where we interview our ambassadors and people that inspire us. First up we have shredder Byron Rhoda!

Five favourite skate parks: Kimberley skate plaza, Durbanville DIY skatepark, The Shred skatepark, Mill street skate plaza and George SkateLab.

Five favourite pro skaters: Paul Rodriguez, Luan Oliveira, Ryan Sheckler, Andrew Reynolds and Jon Allie

Five favourite sponsors: Revolution skate shop, Killer Speed Co, Tensor trucks, Verb skateboards, Globe footwear and apparel.

Five favourite Globe shoes: Mahalo Black Toffee, Shinto Navy, GS Black/Black, Roam Lyte Black Leaves, Mahalo Lyte Black/White.

Five favourite flip tricks: Front side flip, tre flip, backside heel flip, nollie heel flip, nollie tre flip.

Yuri Facchini Interview

An Interview with Yuri Facchini

An Interview with Yuri Facchini

How long did you have to film for X2 VISION?
Maybe around a year, something like that…

What is it like filming with TJ for the video?
TJ is the shit man! He’s always full of energy motivating me and everyone around not just on skateboarding but on pretty much everything else, it was fun good times with this G! WOOO!

What cities and countries did you film in for the video?
Pretty much all around Brazil, parts of Spain, Italy, and Southern California.

10b

What was the funnest part of filming for the video?
Traveling to new countries, meeting new people and skating with all the homies, of course!

How was it working with Mike Manzoori on X2 VISION?
It was really fun man, Mike; he kills it! Mike has all these crazy-ass ideas and really knows what to do with them. I haven’t known Mike for that long, but I could tell when I met him he would be a sick guy to work with.

Any spoilers?
Nawwwww… hahaha!

Yuri Facchini

What was the toughest part of filming for the video?
Didn’t really have that much time to film everything that I wanted to do, and a couple tricks that were stuck on my mind, but that’s how it is, skateboarding never stops; will always have something new to try and to do.

What is next after this video?
Going to keep what I’m doing now, skating and having a lot of fun – always ready for the next thing.

Blind X2 Vision is now available on DVD and iTunes!

www.blindskate.com

Yuri Facchini

Yuri Facchini

ROASTIN’ RECORDS INTERVIEW

Roastin' Records That Analog Feeling

Who is Roastin’ Records?
Roastin’ Records was born out of the shared love for vinyl records. Roastin’ Records is Wentzel van der Gryp and Rouleaux van der Merwe. Wentzel started sourcing and selling new and used vinyls in 2012 and set up a small record shop inside Deluxe Coffee Works. Wentzel asked Rouleaux to help him with some designs for a logo. One thing led to another and Wentzel and Rouleaux partnered up and decided to start a small independent label releasing local music that they love.

What makes vinyl records so special?
It is a combination of the cover art, the variety of the formats (12inch / 10inch / 7inch), the analog nature of the music and the way that you are ‘forced’ to listen to the whole record. You can’t just skip to the next song (like with a mp3), you kinda have to sit through an album and wait for your favorite song to come up. It makes you appreciate the music listening experience so much more.

Roastin' Records Logo

What was the motivation behind starting Roastin’ Records?
Both of us are fairly obsessed with music. It is a way to channel our collective obsession into something we can share with other people.

Aren’t you worried that the popularity of records is just a trend that will eventually pass on?
We were collecting and swapping/trading vinyl many years before it became a hipster trend. I don’t think that it will go away. People are looking at vinyl to reignite the spark of owning music. It is one thing to have thousands of mp3’s, and to be completely honest, you never actually own those mp3’s. It was either downloaded, copied or ripped from a CD. Buying a vinyl record gives you the satisfaction of holding the physical incarnation of the music in your hands.

Why do you think it has taken South Africans so long to get into collecting records?
You’ve always had your serious collectors in SA, but kids who grew up in the digital age has caught on to the trend you talk about above.

Make Overs Red Vinyl

Roastin’ Records has recently been acting more as a records label, having released a few records for bands. Is this the direction you’re moving towards?
We definitely want to put out as many records as we can. Because vinyl has become a standard output for international bands we want to give SA bands a platform to be on par with the rest of the world. The music is definitely on the same level. SA has so many amazing bands who deserve to have their music on vinyl.

Wildernessking The Devil Inside

Wildernessking 10

What are some of the releases you’ve put out?
Our latest release, the Wildernessking 10inch EP is just about to see the light of day, and we are very excited about it. Roastin’ Records also did a collaborative release for the Pretoria noise punkers Make-Overs with Angry Africa and KRNGY.

Roastin' Records

That Analog Feeling

Any sneak peeks for what we can expect from Roastin’ Records in the near future?
We have a couple of 7inches we want to bring out – a split with Cape Town’s Peasant and JHB heavyweights Conqueror. Also maybe a 7inch for the grindcore band Anthropocene Hell. We will also be getting in some fresh new music on a monthly basis which are available on the webshop and at the record bin in Deluxe Coffee. We also DJ regularly in and around Cape Town and try to let the vinyl sound reach as many people as possible. If you are ever at a venue where we are DJing, please do come say HELLO. We also like tequila.

I imagine you guys have your ear quite close to the ground with South African music. Who should we be keeping an ear out for in the future?
The Psych Night guys are doing some great stuff, The Very Wicked, The Dollfins, WEA (but I think they called it a day?), Black Lung, Bilderberg Motel, Changeling, Peasant, The Moths, Death Pegasus, Make Overs, Conqueror, Dead Lucky, Black Math, Bad Drugs etc.

Top 10 vinyl records of all time?
Unfair question. We both have a broad range of musical taste, but I (Rouleaux) tend to like punk/harcore stuff the most. I can have a top 10 in loads of different genres.

Here is my top 10 list :
1. Descendents – Milo Goes to College
2. Fugazi – End Hits
3. Hawkwind – Space Ritual
4. Fucked Up – Chemistry of Common Life
5. Poison the Well – Versions
6. Ceremony – Ronhert Park
7. The Replacements – Let It Be
8. Sleep – Dopesmoker
9. The Monks – Black Monk Time
10. Bad Brains – S/T

Here is Wentzel’s list. But only for today. Tomorrow it will be very different.
1. Led Zeppelin – II
2. Blood Brothers – Crimes
3. Neil Young – Harvest Moon
4. Panda Bear – Person Pitch
5. Nick Drake – Pink Moon
6. Joanna Newsom – Ys
7. Bob Dylan – Desire
8. Kraftwerk – The Man Machine
9. Nirvana – In Utero
10. Beatles – ? all Beatles!

Roastin' Records Stickers

Roastin' Records T-Shirt

roastinrecords.com
https://www.facebook.com/RoastinRecords
instagram.com/roastinrecords

YBF PLAZA INTERVIEW

YBF Plaza Launch

Gauteng has a new skatepark, and it’s called YBF Plaza. It is situated at 54 Hornbill Road, Bryanston, Johannesburg. The opening is this Saturday. If you’re in Joburg, get there! We caught up with the director of the project, Lee Webber, to chat about the opening…

What does the YBF stand for?
Young Blood Forever.

What was the motivation behind opening the skatepark?
There has been a vision to have a skatepark on the campus for over 8 years now. I think the main motivation was always to create a safe place for the youth to skate/ride and give us the opportunity to build and positively influence the people that use it.

Tell us about your launch day event this weekend…
From the beginning we were keen to make a big day out of it, but so far the event planning, sponsor involvement and interested users have surprised us with how big it has become. The day consists of a skate competition for U12’s, U16’s, Ladies, Open and Pro’s. During lunch and towards the end of the day we have a team of BMX riders that will be involved with a BMX Demo on the park. These guys have been very helpful in getting the word out and are planning a BMX comp sometime around June. There will also be loads for the kids to do with the field being set up with a climbing wall, water inflatables, slides, train, mechanical surf board and a play station marquee.

YBF Plaza – The Introduction from Ryan Jarrett on Vimeo.

Why did you decide to go for a more plaza style skatepark?
I grew up skating street, simply because the closest real skate park was at least an hours drive from my house. In addition to my love for a street set up I also think that most of the Joburg parks have more of a bowl/vert vibe. We were excited to add something different and more modern in terms of design. The feedback we’ve had has been very positive.

South Africa has had quite a few skateparks open and close over the years. Why do you think that is? What do you think will make YBF Plaza stick around?
I think there are a few reasons for that. One reason is that people who build a park to make money usually build in an affluent area. The downside is that the overheads that go towards the rented property are too high compared to the fees charged over and above the initial layout for building the park. On the other side you have people that offer a piece of land to use in an area with little to no value and you usually end up with a park that is not cared for and is not safe to use because of crime in the area. Often the parks are built on public or commercial properties that get shut down as soon as the next development needs land or the need for a higher return on investment arises. YBF Plaza will stick around because it is a private church project funded by the church to serve the community. The park is more valuable to us than the parking bays it was built on. We expect it to run successfully for many years.

What were some of the biggest challenges you faced building the park?
With the usual building delays and having to move the opening date twice. I think the biggest challenge is trying to end up with a perfect product in a country where there is not much experience when it comes to building a skatepark.

YBF Plaza

Is the park free or do you have to pay to skate? What made you decide to take this approach?
You would need to pay to use the park. A daily fee can be paid or the users have the option of a 1 month, 3 month or 6 month pass. All of the latter will present a saving. The main two motivations for this approach is that to the user there is more of a structured environment that places more value on the park. The second reason is that we wanted the park to be self sufficient in that the funds brought in could potentially cover the costs for flood lights, electricity, daily cleaning, sweeping and general maintenance.

How do you feel about helmet rules?
We feel that the right thing to do is that anyone under 18 years old should wear a helmet, a user over the age of 18 can sign a helmet waiver form should he wish to do so.

Who designed and built the park?
We had a basic idea of how we wanted the park to be structured early on but it was Clive Crofton that designed and sketched the park up. 95% of the construction work was done by his company Spyda Ramps.

Is the park open to everyone i.e. skateboarders, boxers, rollerbladers?
The park is open to everyone. Depending how busy it gets we may split some sessions and specify who uses the park on certain days.

Anything else we should know?
Nothing springs to mind.

YBF Plaza’s website: http://www.ybfplaza.co.za/
YBF Plaza’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/YBFplaza

YBF Plaza – The Overview from Ryan Jarrett on Vimeo.

YBF Plaza – The Edit from Ryan Jarrett on Vimeo.

YBF PlazaPhoto: Tim Moolman

This is YBF

TAHITI PEHRSON INTERVIEW

Tahiti Pehrson

Interview by Adrian Day

A few years ago, Rudi Jeggle was telling me about a friend of his in Northern California who was this amazing artist. He put us in touch and before I knew it he had done three graphics for Familia. Fast forward a few months and I was hanging out with Tahiti and his friends in Grass Valley and Nevada City, skating burly pools and hitting karaoke jams. More than anything I was highly inspired by Tahiti and his like-minded people. Ultimately it was this broad interaction of art, on every level, that I found to be a motivator. A sort of carpe diem approach to music, skating, painting, whatever… I came back to SA and started making music. Pretty much because of the trip. Years ago we started talking about getting him down to SA to have an exhibition, and in 2014, Tahiti is having a solo show at Salon 91. Accompanying him is David Nicholson, a filmmaker who is documenting the trip which will be screened later in the year at the Nevada City Film Festival.

Tahiti is about the funniest and mellowest dude out, and his artistic virtuosity blows my mind every time I see it. The art in itself is a testament to his drive, dedication and artistic genius. Tahiti Pehrson’s show, Connectivity, has it’s opening at Salon 91 Wednesday 26th Feb at 18.30, and will be up until 22 March. Check the Facebook event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/500683666715131. Do yourself a favour…

Tahiti Pehrson

You’ve been here for a little over a week. Is Cape Town what you thought it would be?
I didn’t really know what to expect so I was pretty blown away. It can’t really be captured in photos. The clouds coming over Table Mountain – I can say I’ve really never seen anything like it.

Give us a brief skate history of yourself, beginnings, crews etc.
I grew up in Grass Valley in Northern California. I met Chris Senn in my second year of high school. I heard from a friend of mine that there was a dude who could do 360’s off a jump ramp every time. I had to see it myself. We started skating together a lot. Soon after he got hooked up on Powell so we would tag along on his Powell trips. My other close bro’s were on this company Trust Skateboards. Jason Clark, Genaro Vegoglini and Justin Smith. We lived in a car and just skated all the time. John Cardiel and Toad lived lived a couple minutes south of us so those guys would come blow our minds. John hooked me and another guy up on flow for Dogtown for like a year before it went under.

What would you say influenced the style you have become known for? Ie was it a natural evolution from stencil graffiti, or were there visual instances that triggered it all?
I was going to art school and it was just killing my inspiration, so I started painting in the streets. It was way more live and like skating. Plus I had a lot of experience ditching cops so it was it was pretty natural. That mentality got old after a while but the stencil idea kept evolving.

What is the process for one of your works?
It changes but in the last five years I have been into this really geometrical style. Those are made on a computer and more and more I have been drawing over the top of those… and even more now really organic stuff with no computers.

You told me your first board was a Blender, who had a large effect on skateboarders being artists etc. Did those early skate artists like Blender, Gonz, Miller etc play a role or sew seeds in your mind, or were you more interested broader artists?
Yeah man, super into those guys. I was into Salvador Dali and stuff like that too, but Blender, Gonz and Miller had this natural delivery and they lived their art. It wasn’t just a thing you produce it was a way of seeing and adapting so I took that with me.

Tahiti Pehrson

How much does your mental state affect the designs of your work, if at all?
I’m kind of always positive. I used to be bummed or let myself fall into it but when my daughter was born I really started to stay on a positive mental path. It really works. It sounds trite but once I got into that headspace everything fell into place and the momentum started. So now it’s pretty easy to be stoked. I mean I’m in South Africa pursuing my first loves; skateboarding and art, so I can’t complain.

5 best things about Cape Town:
Skate community rules, natural beauty, supernatural beauty, the accent, wildlife, nightlife, Adrian Day, Instagramming.

5 best things about Nevada City:
Community, skate scene, good music, lazy vibe and you can get by on very little effort. The river there is banging in the summer. Good times.

Check out Tahiti’s work online at www.tahitipehrson.com

Tahiti Pehrson

ANDREW NERO INTERVIEW

Andrew Nero

How did you first get into skateboarding? What keeps you interested?

I got into skateboarding around the end of 1999 at age 12. A female friend of mine was rolling around the Strand Lifesaving Club parking lot one afternoon and I grabbed her board, rolled around a bit but pretty much fell in love within the first two minutes, trying to ride up a bank and over an edge. I couldn’t believe such a small obstacle could stop me dead and ever since then I have seen the world around me through skater’s eyes, wanting to ride and conquer the streets around me. Skating to me is the sickest form of expression and freedom. I’m no artist, so this is my way of getting out and doing what I want, how and when I want to do it. Go FAST, skate whatever is around you and enjoy every bit of every session no matter how good or bad your day has been.

Tell us about Africa Skate

Around March 2010 I started sharing a ton of skate content on Facebook. This quickly morphed into creating a WordPress blog called AfricaSkateNet and after 10 months or so I bought the web domain AfricaSkate.com. The idea being to share national, African and international skateboarding-based or related content from an online hub for all to see. Little exposure is given to the small communities around SA and Africa, so Africa Skate is a platform to share insights, events, news, skate happenings and a huge motivation for us to keep going and growing. It’s not just myself running the site and events, but a group of skaters, filmers and photographers that have been involved in the SA skate scene for years. There is so much capacity for growth in the African skateboarding scene so I really encourage people from across the nation and up into Africa to drop us an email, link to a video or even a few photo’s and words from their skate scene so we can get you some exposure.

Find us online, send us an email or Facebook message, tag us in a photo or video:

Website
Email: info@africaskate.com
Instagram: @AfricaSkate
Twitter: @africaskate
Facebook

Andrew NeroPhoto by JJ van Rooyen

And Go Skate Cape?

GSC started out in February of 2011 as a local skate get-together. The idea being to host a local event for skaters at a different location around the Cape Peninsula on the last Sunday of every month from 12pm to 4pm. This got skaters from a bunch of communities together for a fun afternoon of skating and the chance to pick up some product by simply being there and having some fun. We always have photographers and filmers at each spot to cover the event and do a post event re-cap via the site. Check out the last Go Skate Cape event we held at Edgemead.

What do you think about the state of skateboarding in South Africa?

Right now the SA skate scene is thriving and growing at a rapid pace. Our scene has gone through many ups and downs over the past decades but it’s in a good space at present and getting better. Best aspects: seeing so many youngsters; boys and girls from all backgrounds picking up boards and skating whatever there is around them to skate. The progression and skill development is monumental. Worst: skaters expecting to get given product and provided with parks/skate spots.

What do you think we could do to improve it?

Educate, encourage and incentivise the youth to get them rolling and creating self-sustainable skate communities, and become part of the national and global skate scene. The skaters need to know it’s up to them to help build the scene from the ground up and not to expect hand-outs from anyone.

You’ve been in Jeffreys Bay for a while now. What were you doing there?

I’m living in Jefferys Bay till December doing some work with the Christian skaters and surfers. By the time you get to read this I’ll have just come back from a series of events that I had been managing and assisting with. We hit towns like Mossel Bay, George, Knysna, Jefferys Bay, Port Alfred and East London running events, skating and surfing with locals at their local spots.

Andrew Nero

What was your involvement with the Kimberley Diamond Cup?

I’ve been working alongside Chinner in setting up and managing the KDC website and social media online. This year’s event went down incredibly well despite the short time-frame we had in planning. I’m pleased to be a part of what KDC and Skate for Hope are doing within the SA skate scene, and are continuing to do.

Any future plans?

Keep rolling, working and to keep helping the growth of African Skateboarding both online, on the ground with the homies through events and in any way I can.

Shout outs?

I got to give it up to my parents, family and the Lord Jesus for keeping my passion going for so long. I’m truly blessed and hyped to be skateboarding almost every day as well as earning a living through skateboarding. BIG UP to my homies and African skaters from across this amazing continent as well as the companies that have backed myself or Africa Skate in any way! Thanks to Revolution for hooking me up with shoes and boards. Clayton you’re the man!

Support Local African Skateboarding

Andrew Nero

Andrew Nero

Andrew Nero

All photos: Andre Visser

JUSTIN SOUTHEY INTERVIEW

Justin Southey Day Dreamer

Justin Southey is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I have always been secretly envious of the fact that Bruce Mackay got to do one in your last release, so I was very stocked when Verb approached me to do a board of my own.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I found a wife, and lost my spare time.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I happened to be overseas when I was asked to design a board, so it felt right to make a board about ocean adventures, the discovering of new lands and strange creatures, and of course the illusive search for hidden treasure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Great, I do the occasional drop of street art, so I am used to people trashing, stealing, and adding to my artwork.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I love doing work on different mediums and for different applications, so I am stoked to get the opportunity to try doing it for a skateboard.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Draw. Erase. Redraw. Save (& send).

Come see Justin’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Justin’s work:

Justin Southey Day Dreamers

Justin Southey In Your Head

Justin Southey Podium

Justin Southey Sexy Times

Justin Southey Mountain Retreat

Justin Southey Street Love

Hanno van Zyl Interview

Hanno van Zyl

For The AssemblyFor The Assembly. Brush and Ink.

Hanno van Zyl is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I grew up skateboarding; I have always been surrounded by skateboarders and I have always been influenced by skate culture. I think it has helped me to understand what the value of counter culture is and instilled me with a more questioning nature. It has always been a personal goal to design my own board graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

Hope.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to design something that specifically acknowledges the fact that it is on a skateboard. That would mean that it will get completely trashed after about two days of use. I wanted to take this into account and implicate the skater as part of the artwork. ‘Hot chicks’ were a stock-standard graphic option for skateboarding brands (think of the iconic Hook-ups brand) and was hugely popular when I was a teenage skater. I offer a slightly more honest and sinister look at this stylistic trademark and how it interacts with the idea of female objectification and the male gaze.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I tried to work that fact into the concept and made it an intrinsic part of the piece.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

I don’t believe that a “normal canvas” exists. The medium is part of the message and I feel that every piece an artist does should be self-aware and critical of the space that it inhabits. The fact that I will essentially collaborate with a whole bunch of skaters to create unexpected new results is what excites me the most about this specific piece.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Search. Select. Interrogate. Adjust. Draw.

Come see Hanno’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Hanno’s work:

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

For Van Coke KartelFor Van Coke Kartel. Brush and digital.

Self InitiatedSelf Initiated. Ink and Digital.

For LarkFor Lark. Brush and digital.

DANIEL TING CHONG INTERVIEW

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Mag Icons

Daniel Ting Chong is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Doing a skateboard graphic has always been a “holy grail” project for me. When I was a little kid, I loved looking at the Birdhouse and Blind skateboard graphics. The colours were always saturated and clean; it really inspired me when I was younger to test out styles and linework. Since then I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic that was officially printed by a skate brand. So when I was asked by Verb to take this project on, I grabbed it with both hands.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost this amazing Ninja Turtles watch that had nunchucks for clock hands. One thing I did find worth mentioning was a stack of old Letraset packs.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I initially started with a completely different design to the one that is printed. I sketched out an idea of a boy and girl hugging each other on the edge of a mountain cliff. The pose was meant to be very dramatic with the boy holding the girl with her legs curled up behind her. The twist was that in each of their hands they had a knife pierced into each others back. Dramatic right? I liked it because it had the basic idea of lost & found, but with a dark undermining layer. On the morning of the deadline, I decided to change my design completely. I didn’t connect with the characters anymore and just didn’t like it. I then had a more graphic approach of creating intricate twists and curls out of ribbons which represent intersecting pathways. When you have a glance at it, your eye follows certain paths but gets confused by overlapping sections. You almost have to stop, look and navigate where you are again.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I really like that idea. It’s probably the most embracing thing that can happen to a design, where something totally out of your control changes your design in a organic way. Most of us nowadays design on a computer or sketch something out the way we want it to stay, but I think it is great that something created in a framed purpose can be totally broken and given a tangible path. It’s so boring when work only lives on the Internet, but now it has a chance to never be finished in a sense and always evolving.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

To reiterate some of my answers, I’ve always wanted to do a skateboard graphic and this is my first attempt so it’s always exciting and fun. More importantly, I’m excited that my artwork will be traveling the streets, kissing curbs, rails and spinning around a lot. I think it’s probably the most fun any of my artwork will go through.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Thinking. Stressed. Creating. Re-Thinking. Happy.

Come see Daniel’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Daniel’s work:

Daniel Ting ChongStr.Crd Festival Brand Identity

Daniel Ting ChongNike AFCON Tournament

Daniel Ting ChongNew York Times Magazine

Daniel Ting ChongABSA Cityscape

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x RVCA Guitar Show

Daniel Ting ChongDTC x 2BOP

Daniel Ting ChongKidrobot Munny Custom

JACO HAASBROEK INTERVIEW

Jaco HaasbroekAcrylic & Ink on Paper. 148.5 mm x 210 mm.

Jaco Haasbroek is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I’ve always wanted to design a skateboard graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

As a kid I once picked up R20 at a fair and was really happy about it, thinking that I now had R40 to spend, only to realise that I had lost my R20.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I was thinking about the word ‘nowhere’ and how, when broken into two, it becomes ‘now’ & ‘here’. So it represents both being lost and found. I then applied this to the old saying “I’m in the middle of nowhere” which, when stated, is both a declaration of being lost, but also establishes a specific location – if that makes any sense. I then just turned the ‘H’ into a character, seeing as he is literally in the middle of nowhere.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I don’t mind. If people want to keep the artwork in tact they can hang it on a wall. It is, after all, a functional object and there’s something great about the artwork changing as it gets used.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It lends itself well to being a flat surface to print on, but also has some slight curves and this makes it sculptural. It seems to become an art object, as apposed to just another print.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Think. Sketch. Trace. Colour. Save.

Come see Jaco’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jaco’s work:

Jaco HaasbroekPop It

Jaco HaasbroekSkating On Thin Ice

Cape Town

Jaco HaasbroekMike Stroud

Jaco HaasbroekThe i In TEAM

GERHARD HUMAN INTERVIEW

Gerhard Human Click Click Bang Bang

Gerhard Human is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. He is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with him to chat about his graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

Why not? Get my own personal deck AND exhibit with some rad people!

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I lost a Traser watch in Montagu 3 years ago. It was black and had orange bits on the numbers, in case if anyone finds it… I found R20 in my back pocket a while ago! That was great.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

I wanted to do a design that you can spend time looking at; something that takes you away from the surroundings you’re used to and add a sense of adventure.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

Well, nothing stays beautiful forever. That’s the nature of life. Things deteriorate and from that comes new ideas. There’s a Buddhist practice of crafting an intricate mandala out of coloured sand, which takes hours, even days to complete. After it’s finished they destroy it and start all over again. It’s supposed to teach you about the impermanence of material things… I guess in that same way letting go of precious material things is therapeutic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

The exciting thing is the audience it will be exposed to. Doing a painting that hangs in a gallery is great but is often only seen by upperclass people who’re in the habit of buying art. Whereas, a skateboard will be used by people like me. People who LIVE a creative life.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Explore. Trance. Capture. Fixate. Trust.

Come see Gerhard’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Gerhard’s work:

Gerhard Human Forest

Gerhard Human Last Days of Billy The Kid

Gerhard Human Look At It

Gerhard Human Obscured by Clouds

Gerhard Human Safe From Harm

JADE KLARA INTERVIEW

Coral Girl - Jade Klara

Jade Klara is an artist based in Cape Town, South Africa. She is also one of the artists who did a deck graphic for the new Verb Artists Series 2013 range, which will be here soon. We caught up with her to chat about her graphic and what went into it…

What made you decide to take on this project?

I had a board when I was 8; an old 80’s shape with a bright pink mutant rat graphic. I was in love. I have always wanted to do a skate graphic.

Name 1 thing you’ve lost and 1 thing you’ve found, worth mentioning.

I once found a 5 leaf clover, but I was very young and bad at maths so you never know. I lose my brushes all the time but I find them holding my hair up.

Tell us more about your artwork. Why did you decide to do what you did? What is the story behind it?

When I thought of lost & found I thought of ancient treasure, of heaps of gold and rubies hiding in an undiscovered cave. I was then really intrigued by a genie’s lamp, but instead of a typical genie I wanted something more animalistic, so the wolf genie was born. I kept the scene quite dark and ghostly and then used metallic gold as a reference to lost treasure and magic.

You do understand that, through the execution of your artwork onto the bottom of a skateboard deck, most of the replicas of your artwork will be thrown around, and get scratched and broken in the street right? How does that make you feel?

I like that it has a lifespan. Ephemeral things are more poetic.

Doing a graphic to be applied onto a skateboard deck is essentially just creating an artwork for a different size and shape canvas than normal. What excites you about the idea that your artwork is going to feature on a deck as opposed to doing a regular print?

It’s great that this canvas has a purpose. It gets to move and break and see the world.

Name 5 verbs that describe your process when you were creating your graphic.

Growl, draw, make-a-wolf-face-for-reference, draw, exhale.

Come see Jade’s deck first hand at the lost/found exhibition on 28 November…

Some more examples of Jade’s work:

Nest - Jade Klara

Bind - Jade Klara

Ghost Sloth - Jade Klara

Ghost Sloth - Jade Klara

Sloth Poster - Jade Klara

Lost - Jade Klara

PAUL SENYOL INTERVIEW

Letters to Lotte – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 905mm x 635mm – framed

A Vacant Passage opens this weekend, so we caught up with artist Paul Senyol to talk to him about it…

Tell us about A Vacant Passage, your exhibition this weekend with Andrzej Urbanski.
It is a two person show, opening on Saturday at Salon91 Contemporary Art Collection. Andrzej and I met about a year and a half ago for the first time. We have since become close friends and, during this time, have discovered many similarities in our approach to work and life, as well as our past. The exhibition is an exploration along these themes.

How did you guys meet? What made you decide to work on an exhibition and collaborate on some work together?
I heard that Andrzej was at /A WORD OF ART AIR (Artist In Residence) programme, and one day I passed by him while cycling down the street. At the time he was busy painting a wall. I waved, shouted “nice wall” and carried on riding. A few days later we met again while walking down the street. We exchanged numbers, and when AJ returned a few months later, we started to hang out a bit more. We both enjoy each others’ work, and we had an idea to do some collaborative walls and art pieces. Monique at Salon91 and myself were planning exhibitions and shows for myself in January this year, and we decided to do a two person show in October. I suggested AJ as the other artist whom I most wanted to work with.

Charlotte – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 930mm x 795mm – framed

What do you think influences your personal style to be more abstract than ‘straight forward’, if I can say that?
I like to play with line and colour, and create things that are a bit more allusive and are able to draw a viewer in, as well as engage with a person as they start to make sense of a piece and interpret it for themselves. I believe that in painting there needs to be a fair bit of interpretation allowed on the viewers behalf. I like to engage with the viewer’s imagination.

The press release for the exhibition mentioned that “To the artists, Germany is a vacant place, Poland is a vacant place, and some day, South Africa too might become a vacant place.” What is a ‘vacant’ place?
Through our time researching and creating works for the exhibition, we came across so many old photos of places, people and things that no longer exist but, if you showed one of these photos to my Dad for instance, it would bring back a memory of something that perhaps no longer exists. As people, we travel to and from places, leave things behind, take things with us, make friends etc., but at the end of the day, we cannot take a place with us. In essence, the place becomes vacant when we leave, but it remains in our minds and in our hearts. Germany and Poland became vacant for our families because, for various reasons, they were forced to move. It has been fascinating to me exploring these places via photos, letters and diaries from my grandparents.

Pretoria Castle – mixed media on Hahnemeule Bamboo 285gm – 485mm x 460mm – framed

What made you decide to integrate computer software and technologies into the exhibition? How has it been integrated?
A friend of Monique’s, Johan, approached us with this concept of showing work in a new way, via digital means. What excited AJ and myself was that it would allow us to show work in a physical space, but bring the viewer into contact with all the history and source we had used in a non-tangible digital space. We are now able to elaborate on these ‘vacant passages’ through which our families and ourselves have travelled.

What do you hope that people get out of viewing the exhibition?
I hope people are inspired by the works we have created, and that they realise that each day they have the opportunity to continue writing a history story of their own; that through the exhibition they realise the importance of friendships and family. These archived photos, letters and documents from my grandparents are fascinating for their history, but also how they shape my identity and sense of place in this world. We all leave a legacy of some form, and I hope that people are inspired to leave behind a positive trace of themselves as they travel through their lifetime.

What does the future have in store for Paul Senyol?
A few more art shows locally this year and a short residency in Germany halfway through 2014. After the opening on Saturday I would like to take a few days off to plot some ideas for upcoming shows and projects.

Any last words?
The show opens on Saturday at 11h00. We will have some sweet ice cream, as well as be making a braai. Come on down and say hi, hang out, and enjoy the opening with us.

A Vacant Passage Invite from Monique du Preez on Vimeo.

BETRAYAL INTERVIEW

Betrayal

Give us a brief history behind how and why the band started, and how you got to the point where you are now.

At the beginning the band started for simple reasons; just some friends who wanted to get together, play music, and have fun while doing it. It wasn’t until a few years later we started realizing that people actually cared and wanted to hear more. We’re still awesome friends and still having fun with what we do.

Would you mind introducing the band members, and what you guys all do in your lives? Or is the band quite a full time thing?

My name is Andrew Adolph a.k.a. Shakewell. I play bass in Betrayal and the band is a huge part of my life. When I’m home I make hip-hop music. Sean Chamilian is our guitar player and also writes the music for Betrayal. He is a graphic designer and works for a clothing company back home called Defiant Youth Merch. Brendan Foley is our vocalist and writes the lyrics for Betrayal. When he’s home he works at Old Navy, does Pilates, plays video games and listens to Freddie Gibbs. Anthony Ramirez is our drummer. When he’s home he works at Guitar Center in the drum department.

How would you describe the music you make to someone who hasn’t heard you before?

I’d tell them that it is aggressive, heavy, fast, passionate music.

Betrayal

Who / what would you say some of your major influences as a band are?

Pantera, Comeback Kid, Pennywise.

What is the Los Angeles hardcore scene like compared to the other parts of the country?

Although we have friends in many parts of the world, there’s nothing like playing home and being able to see all of your neighborhood friends, as well as new faces, come out and have fun together.

Being a touring band, what are some of your favorite places you’ve been and why?

We obviously love going anywhere overseas for the fact that we get to experience new cultures and ways of life.

What are you expecting South Africa to be like? Any preconceived ideas? Are you guys hoping to do anything specific while you’re here?

We’re honestly are going into this with no preconceived notions. We are ready for any cultural experience with open arms!

What bands are you guys psyched on at the moment?

Let Live, Rotting Out, Lower Than Atlantis, Grimes, Breakfast.

Any last words?

See you all in September! All Praise Swank God.

Betrayal

Betrayal will be in South Africa this month, touring alongside Conqueror and Truth and Its Burden. They’re playing their first show 26 September. Here’s the full list of shows:

Betrayal SA Tour | PRETORIA

Betrayal SA Tour | JOHANNESBURG

Betrayal SA Tour | DURBAN

Betrayal SA Tour | PIETERMARITZBURG

Betrayal SA Tour | EAST LONDON

Betrayal SA Tour | PORT ELIZABETH

Betrayal SA Tour | GEORGE

Betrayal SA Tour | CAPE TOWN

TRUTH AND ITS BURDEN INTERVIEW

Photo By Christelle Duvenage

Where does the name ‘Truth And Its Burden’ come from?

It’s basically been derived from a song by a band called The Hope Conspiracy. They have this song called “Youth And Its Burden” and I just kind of changed it up and made new sense of it.

Who’s in the band? What do you guys do outside of TAIB?

The band is made up of the following dudes: Ashley / Vocals (Me) – I do graphic and web design for my own business called Capture Creative Design, Calvin / Guitar – works as an internal sales manager for a music distribution company called Agent Audio, Niekie / Bass – works as a sales clerk for a 24 hour pawn shop and Matt / Drums – works as a store manager for a bicycle shop in Fourways.

Photo by Christelle Duvenage

Tell us more about your recent American and European tour overseas.

The tours were all great. We had loads of fun, and learnt a lot about ourselves and each other. While enjoyable at the best of times, they were also tough and really gave us a more real perspective on our dreams and what we want with Truth and Its Burden in the future. I think overall we were well received abroad and we definitely are looking forward to getting back over there on bigger and better touring opportunities.

Why do you think hardcore, metal and punk music isn’t that big in South Africa, as opposed to places in Europe where you can get 60000 people at a festival?

I don’t think media cares too much for it, which sadly seeps into the general public. This might sound off-centre, but I do feel popularity is all based on perception; if media says it’s cool, then it’s cool. Right now the media here don’t think those genres are cool, whereas a few years ago they had frequent attention in magazines like Blunt, which played a huge role in placing these genres in the average kid’s pathway from early on. Radio stations like 5FM gave a damn and Barney Simon really believed in South African hard music. It was on his show that I was introduced to Shifty, Tweak, Fuzigish, and that whole live music scene for me followed shortly thereafter. MK had the opportunity to carry that torch but focus attention on the same thing too often, and only selective shows like MK Ondergrond place some mild attention on harder music. I think people took a lot for granted back then and no one followed in those steps, and by the time people thought to, the momentum built up by the above mentioned had almost disappeared entirely. I’m sure there are many factors though. I’m not even scratching the surface.

I think sometimes a lot people are keen to get involved, but actually don’t know where to start. What advice can you give someone one how to find out about upcoming events, bands etc. in the more ‘underground’ music world?

Back when I started booking shows, there was a need to create that market. I was playing in a small unknown punk band and we needed shows. We knew we would have a really difficult time getting shows with bigger, more prominent bands, so we started booking our own shows with venues, making our own flyers etc. We never had the Facebook and Myspace online outlets and relied on word of mouth, other shows and participating in a scene daily. There was a need to exist in a place we called home, which was created purely, I feel, by knowing what you wanted in life. I, like many other musicians and participants in the scene knew this early on, and because you know this about yourself, you seek out like-minded folk and express your need to contribute and participate. The easiest advice though is this: go to shows and support live music. If it grips you and sparks your absolute interest then stay involved and you’ll soon enough find yourself doing something constructive within that scene/subculture.

Your lyrics seem to hold some substance to them. What would you hope that people get out of listening to your music or watching you live?

It would be nice for people to feel good about life; just a general change of perspective on how good our lives really are. To understand that we are all very fortunate, as fortunate as being able to read and understand the text in this interview or having the means to have found this website. Sounds crazy to some folks, but there are people who literally have nothing. We just want people to feel like they can reach their dreams and be stoked on life and their talents and achievements. Few people see their own worth. That’s the real tragedy in all this, and because of it they stay in shit jobs and live life on the ‘just getting by’ mentality.

You’re touring SA with US band Betrayal closer to the end of this year. Can you tell us more about that?

We’re stoked of course, as any band would be. It’s a great opportunity for us to show the dudes what a beautiful country we have. We met Sean while on tour in USA, so having the guys out here is a real treat indeed. We will be touring alongside Conqueror as well, who have been the talk of town lately so we’re super excited to see how it all plays out. The shows are going through the entire country with fresh stop-offs in new territory like George, so we’re super excited to see how that comes together. Also, the choice of venues for the tour is totally different for hardcore bands, and we’re really trying something new. Hopefully people see this and the shows attract some new faces across the board.

What does the future hold for TAIB?

Who knows hey. We have plans of touring Europe again, as well as USA in 2014, but we have much to work out before that actually happens. We’re writing a new album at the moment, so our energy is totally focused on that right now.

Any upcoming bands we should look out for?

Hmm… Maybe not upcoming bands so much as albums we found and love; Misery Signals – Absent Light, Shai Hulud – Reach Beyond The Sun, Counterparts – The Difference Between Hell And Home, Mercia – Exile In Ruin. Most of you probably know these bands already, but they released solid albums and these are busting our ears lately.

Any shout outs?

Yeah, we’d like to thank our sponsors at Music Connection, Jagermeister, Handstyle Tattoos and Monster Energy. We’d also like to thank everyone that got involved with the Betrayal tour to help promote it, spread the word/flyers/posters/whatever. To the companies who came on board like MK Ondergrond and Revolution, we appreciate that. Lastly, we’ve recently spent time in a great studio called Watts Productions with the dudio named Clint Watts. Check this guy out and give him your time of day. He’s a great engineer with rad perspective. Look out for the new single.

Truth And Its Burden

LEON BESTER INTERVIEW

Leon Bester

Leon Bester is one of the nicest guys you might ever meet. A local Cape Town boy, Leon has been active in skateboarding, art, photography and videography for a while now, and owns at both. Find out more about the man behind the wayfarers. We introduce you to Leon Bester…

Take us through a day in the life of Leon Bester.

Alarm goes off, snooze button, snooze button, snooze button. This goes on for quit a while. Then I’ll start my day with a nice cup of tea, check on my plants and water them. Next I’ll jump into some denims and depending on the weather I’ll cycle down to the Woodstock Exchange to take care of business. If I leave before sunset I’ll go for a little skate, maybe a cheeky beer after. Then it’s dinner time and chill time.

Who/what inspires/influences you to do art?

There are endless things that will inspire me or spark a new thought or idea. I love to gather inspiration from all over and from many different things, situations and artists.

What sparked your interest in screen printing?

When I started my course in Graphic Design at Cape Tech, I was always fascinated in printmaking and I knew screen printing was part of our course, but only from second year. After my first year they pretty much scratched screen printing from our course, so when the time came to go and do an internship, I decided to intern at ilovescreenprinting. After the two week internship I was hooked on this new skill I’ve learned. I pretty much built a DIY set-up and bought a few screens and just carried on printing. For the whole of 2012 I ran my own screen printing studio in the northern suburbs. I mostly printed t-shirts, but my favourite is to print onto wood. I don’t print as much anymore, but it’s always fun to go mess around in the studio and make some t-shirts or print some artwork, get covered in paint, etc.

Leon BesterKlick Klak Exhibition Photos. Screen print on wood.

What are some of your favorite projects that you’ve worked on?

I am really amped on all of the adidas projects I have been involved with. The most recent being the PE (Port Elizabeth) skate trip and the Gonz Exhibition. Always good fun and interesting trips. Another one stands out; about 2 months ago, Toby from ‘Hello Again’ in long street asked myself and Inus Smuts to do some t-shirt designs for his shop. I did a photo series on well known streets and landmarks of Cape Town, but from a first person view on a bicycle. I pretty much looked like crazy tourist cycling in the middle of the streets through town with my camera dangling from my neck while shooting the photos, haha. But I am really happy with the way it came out in the end. Risked my life a few times to get those shots, haha.

What are you listening to right now?

Yeasayer, Tame Impala, Neil Young, Future Island and some Witch.

What is this ‘Streets’ gang you’re part of? Does your Mom know about it?

Hahaha! Streets is pretty much a bunch of homies that love to skate, travel, braai, hang out, smash some beers and cause all sorts of shit together. Yeah, we are a diverse group of people that just started skating together in the school years and we still skate, hang out and make missions together as much as we can.

streets-design-clock-screen-printed‘Streets’ design clock. Screen printed.

You were a videographer on the recent adidas skateboarding trip to PE. Care to share any stories from the trip?

There are so many good stories from that trip. Like when we had to saw off this piece of railing to make a handrail skateable. Or Jansen swinging and smashing everything in his way with the one golf club we had with us. Khulu falling over into the bath tub. Pieter giving Jansen a tomato relish shower. Yann shredding that bowl by the park. I can go on and on. There are so many.

Where are you at in skateboarding at the moment? Are you still pushing as hard as you always were?

At the moment I am just enjoying skateboarding for what it is to me. Sometimes I would just hang out with everybody and have a mellow session. Then other times I would find myself jumping or grinding stuff I would never even have looked at before.

Leon Bester Smith Grind Bowl. Photo by Wayne ReicheLeon smith grinds a bowl. Photo by Wayne Reiche.

What are your favorite things about South Africa?

Definitely all the amazing destinations to travel to and all them characters you meet along the way.

Shout outs?

My family for supporting and helping me out since forever. All of my friends for being unique characters. The streets homies, everybody I skate with, people I make art with, Inus Smuts for the daily entertainment, adidas, revolution, the woodstock studio mates and friends, the Pit, everybody that has helped me out on my travels… so many people to thank. All of you play a unique role, so thanks.

adidas Task Bookadidas Task Book

BeertjiesBeertjies

Buck Tour PrintsBuck Tour prints

Anthony de Mendonca & Adam Woolf Interview

ANT&ADAM-Illustration.final

You guys are from Johannesburg right?

Adam: 100% Jo-burgers from Edenvale.
Anthony: Yeah man Jozi all the way.

How do you feel about many of the Jozi skaters/friends having moved to Cape Town?

Adam: Well, I’m happy for them. Cape Town is a rad place and there are lots of sick spots around. It does suck that the Jozi scene has gotten smaller, but the scene is growing here and there are a lot more projects on the rise. People are realizing that if they don’t do anything about it, no one will.
Anthony: I think its amazing. If I’m not mistaken, JHB was the scene for a while and developed a lot of talent. Look at the scene now; its gotten so much larger in such a short amount of time. Clearly good things are coming from their choices, so I’m hyped for the homies. They’re making changes for us and opening new doors.

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With all the major league videographers, photographers, and with AV and Session leaving Jozi, how have you managed to get coverage? Has it been hard or a walk in the “park”?

Adam: Well, I bought a video camera, so I can get my own coverage with all my homies. Either filming each other, making edits, sending footage to AV. On the photo side of things, there happens to be quite a few photographers here that are taking amazing photos, so that at least helps out shooting for Session. Also, filming with Preez films / Wandile, who is contributing to the scene with his new channel, as well as a few others on the rise.
Anthony: It’s been OK. I guess it’s all thanks to the dedicated time from Adam Woolf, Dwayne Erasmus and Jonathan Pinkhard. They’re the homies who are close to home for photos and filming. I also try push as much on social media networks as I can. Wandile and Preez Films have been a lot of help. Wands is taking back the streets. It’s always good riding and filming with him, and sending the occasional footage to AV.

How do you two manage summer without the ocean and fresh air?

Adam: I’m a fucking lizard!
Anthony: I love the ocean, but hate to swim. I get cold super quick, plus I’m paranoid of sharks.

999547_589380604435226_344844079_nAnthony

What are the pro’s and con’s of having skateparks at your disposal?

Adam: With the recent closure of the Revolution Festival Mall park, there isn’t much to skate in the area park-wise. We hit up Sk8world a lot more often now. A few of us came together and built a sick-ass grind box there. We want to keep adding on to the park and build it up. Other than that it’s street all the way.
Anthony: Progression.

Revolution Festival Mall Skatepark is no more. Now where will you guys be spending your rainy days?

Adam: At home, jamming PS3.
Anthony: Not in the rain. Balfours has a nice frontside-up ledge that’s covered. That would be a choice, but I won’t lie, rains a killa, so I’ll be at home.

298770_10151044588211801_1676886130_nAdam

Could you share a fun or dangerous street mission you’ve had in the inner city of Johannesburg?

Adam: Skating it up with the MSA homies in town, cruising around at night skating road gaps. All the guys are super mellow and it was rad to get some footage with them.
Anthony: Brendan, two other homies and I had a good town mission quite a while ago. It started getting dark, but we kept it going. We decided to look for a hand rail, so we got in Brendan’s car and started the search. We got caught up behind a few taxi’s at a robot and the streets were packed with kids, gogos and madalas. Anyway, Brendan’s window was slightly down and these four guys come running towards us from behind the car, two on each side. They came up like they were trying to sell us some dope or crack, asking us if we were okay. I only noticed two on my side, not seeing the other two. All of a sudden the one guy was trying to get his arm in the window and the other guy was trying to open the doors. Brendan drove away as quick as he could but these guys were chasing us while holding onto the car for a brief time and as they let go I heard the one guy casually say “I’ll shoot you”. Brendan said “LET’S GET OUDDA HERE!”. He sounded like Arnold Schwarzenegger!

You guys must be looking forward to the Maloof Money Cup! Do you have any new tricks that you’ve mastered that you would like to try on the plaza this year?

Adam: Hellz yeah! Always looking forward to Maloof! I was thinking about trying a flip backside nosegrind down the hubba. There are lots of new things I want to try. Hyped!
Anthony: I have a Hardflip backside 5-0 in mind, but we’ll see how that goes. What would be what I’d like to leave with knowing I got that over the weekend.

AnthonyAnthony

AnthonyAnthony

Adam

AnthonyAnthony

AdamAdam

Screen-shot-2013-06-12-at-2.44.01-PM

RICH PHIPSON INTERVIEW


Photo by Rochelle Phipson

Richard Phipson is a tattooer who moved from South Africa to Hong Kong and now co-owns Starcrossed Tattoos. Durban-born and bred, Rich has been active in art, tattooing and music for years. We caught up with him to chat about music, the transition from South Africa to Hong Kong and from graphic designer to tattooer, and some other things. Meet Rich Phipson…

Yo Rich! Give us a brief introduction to yourself.
I still don’t eat my veggies.
Still not sure which ones a shirt and which is a t-shirt.
I thought being this age would feel different.
Not all my friends have forgot me yet.
I don’t deserve to be interviewed.

Working originally as a graphic designer, you made quite a career change in deciding to become a tattooer. Can you tell us about why you decided to make that transition and how you got started tattooing?
Tattooing isn’t something you can pick up quickly or do part time. Anyone who thinks that isn’t tattooing, they’re doing something else. I had no choice. It becomes a part of my everything. My night and day. It still is. the process wasn’t intentional. Nothing about the last five years has been though. I’ve just tried my best to keep happy and do whatever moves me. There was a time when that’s what graphic design was for me; exciting. It’s hard to turn a hobby into a job and still appreciate it the way you did before. If you can or do then I think that’s enough to keep you going.

SONY DSC

You grew up and lived in Durban until a few years ago. Why did you decide to move to Hong Kong?
There’s something we carry. Well some of us do. It’s a curse and a blessing. It’s a drive that pushes us to be better and do better but also fools us into always thinking there’s something better. It’s the opposite of complacency. Discontented and dissatisfied. It’s what only let’s us see it after midnight and forces us to stay up to see the sunrise. I dunno if its specific to my generation or culture. But I know me and my friends have it. Also, at the time it seemed like a good idea.

4. What does your typical day look like?
I have two types of days.
Day one starts as late as possible, no food, maybe coffee. Bus to work. Tattoo. Shovel food. Tattoo some more. Hang with homies. Bus home. Eat and hang with Rochelle then draw until my eyes close from the bottom up. Repeat.
Day two hopefully starts earlier. Breakfast. Swim in the sea. Play guitar. Sit in the park. Paint. Dinner somewhere. Watch series. Lots of it.

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What are your best and worst things about South Africa? And Hong Kong?
SA has family, familiarity and a beauty that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. I’ve sacrificed these for safety, both physically and financially.

Besides tattooing, what do you do in your spare time?
Watch loads of series, eat too much chocolate, and play guitar.

Being based in a city where millions of tourists from all over the world travel to or through, you must get some strange people coming into Starcrossed. What are some of the weirder encounters you’ve had?
The weird becomes the norm pretty quickly, but I’ve tattooed a man wearing a panda suit and been given a $7000 tip before.

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Would you say that you have a favorite style of tattoo to do, and if so, what is it?
Not really. There’s more stuff that I don’t like doing. As long as the client gives me creative freedom with their idea I’m generally happy.

What do the local Cantonese people think of tattoos? You are pretty tattooed yourself. I can imagine you get a lot of stares. Although, maybe I am just naive and coming from a South African context, where people generally are still very conservative.
It’s pretty similar here to SA. There are rude people everywhere that feel that because you have colour on your skin they can touch it. But generally the stares aren’t too bad.

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Some people will know of you from playing drums in the infamous Durban hardcore band, Crossingpoint, doing vocals in Joburg hardcore band, Compass, and being involved in some other projects before that. Music has been a big part of your life. Do you have any plans to do anything in Hong Kong? What is the music scene like there?
Yeah, it’s still one of the biggest things in my life. I’ve had plans since I got here, but nothing has worked out yet, but hopefully soon. The music scene is okay. It’s cool to be able to see bigger bands that come through here, but there’s definitely a lack of punk-ethos subcultures. I think it’s got to do with wealth and complacency. But that’s a whole separate rant.

What have you been listening to recently?
Today: O Brother, The Story So Far, Yellow Ostrich, Such Gold and the Local Natives.

What advice would you give someone who wanted to quit their job and do something like you did?
If you wanted to do it you would have done it.

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richphipson.com
starcrossedtattoo.com

BEACH PARTY INTERVIEW

Beach Party

Beach Party are an ‘Psychedelic-Afro-Disco-Surf-Punk’ band from Cape Town. They’ve just released a rad new album, and are pretty busy playing shows and touring. We caught up with the band to chat about playing shows in South Africa, opening for Australian band Dune Rats, and some crazy fan stories. Enjoy…

List band members and instruments:
Danny Video – Oohs, aahs, blahdy blahs
Big Daddy Dollfin a.k.a. “The D” – Bow chika wow wows
Andy ‘Tha Genius’ Islands – Beep boop doops
Black ‘Godspeed Thundercat’ Irish – Boom crash smash bash
Makki ‘Niks’ Summer – Baaarggh baarggh (Bass noises)

First things first, what style of music do you play? For the dumb assess that don’t know who you are or what genre to make of you.
Our music is in the style of ‘Psychedelic-Afro-Disco-Surf-Punk’ also known as ‘Afrodelic-Psyfro-Sisco-Purf-Dunk’ or just ‘Drunk’.

What would you say your all-round fav gig has been so far? The kind that is rad for its fuck ups or its perfection.
Our favorite gig ever was in Pretoria at Arcade Empire. It was wild like the motherfucking jungle that night. Shoh. Makki spent most of the time in the audience moshing with his bass and kicking kids in the face. Black Irish was drumming with his teeth at one point in the show. Nuts.

Beach PartyPhoto by Michael Ellis Photography

If you could mention an up and coming gig that you are mad hyped on that would be spiffy.
We’re very much looking forward to playing Sowing The Seeds festival this weekend on Saturday. If you’re in Mpumalanga then that’s where you need to be.

Beach Party just played a show with Dune Rats from Australia. Tell us how the gig went and what your opinions are on Dune Rats as a band and how they where in person.
The gig was frakkin’ rad! Loads of people showed up and partied super hard which was just lovely. They are really cool guys, exactly like they are in that music video where they just smoke bongs. When we met them they were hitting bongs and when we left them they were still hitting bongs. If you think it’s mad how tight they play it’s just insane how stoned they are when they walk on stage and hold it together like kings! I think we were all stoned once for a show and we forgot everything. Maybe they’ll teach us the ways this weekend.

Beach PartyPhoto by Caroline Mackintosh

You guys have done a few shows/festivals nationally. Which town are your fave to play in and your fav crowd to play for?
Have to say Pretoria and Joburg when it comes to touring, they get the fuck down with us.

Are there any thoughts of Beach Party sailing the seven seas, exploring the top ten beaches of the world or recording an album in a submarine or a whale’s stomach?
So many thoughts! We’re working on that. Aiming for a Narwhal’s intestines though, the acoustics are so squishy. Mmm.

Your audience seems youngish, have any of the band members come across some stalkers or crazy fans? If yes, tell us a story.
Hmmm… Well Andy has a fan site dedicated to his hair where all these creepy girls photoshop his hair on to their elbows. One fan/friend of ours made an animated fan video of us which is awesome but the video is slightly creepy in a good way. Look up ‘Beach Party – Fast Train’. Big D is the most famous though. She gets lots of creepy shit but we can’t discuss those due to legal issues.

Download their new album For Now We Are Young for free: http://www.mediafire.com/?bbuo06ia40twzlo

Beach PartyPhoto by Aidan Tobias

Beach PartyPhoto by Imi Christian

RAOUL GOETZE INTERVIEW

Raoul GoetzePhoto by Dirk Steenkamp

Raoul Goetze is a Cape Town tattooer at Wildfire Tattoos, an artist, and a member of the band Wild Eastern Arches. He is also one of the artist exhibiting work at the Doors of Perception art exhibition on the 23rd of May at Revolution Woodstock. We caught up with him to chat about the upcoming exhibition, art, music and what ‘psychedelic’ means. Meet Raoul Goetze…

How is your artwork coming along for the Doors of Perception art exhibition? Any hints for what we can expect to see?

I’m always in two minds when it comes to executing ideas. It’s a constant debate on how I will try translate the visuals in my head to a tangible form, so consequently it becomes a bit of an irrational completion, which is definitely part of the process I guess. So yeah, my artworks are getting there for the exhibition. For Doors of Perception, I’m trying to explore what really happens chemically when psychedelic drugs are introduced to the brain.

Raoul Goetze

You are quite a creative person: tattooing, making art, and playing in a band. What else do you get up to in your spare time?

Well, I really love everything I’m involved with, so when I have free time, I don’t really consider it as spare time seeing that I wouldn’t mind drawing or playing guitar in that time. Otherwise I probably end up with friends talking about all these things over a couple of beers anyways. I am involved with Psych Night, which probably comes with playing in a band as well.

Why do you make art?

I’m a visual person. I have a need to translate whatever goes on in my head to a visual format.

Raoul Goetze

Tell us about Psych Night…

Psych Night is a collective hosting events celebrating psychedelia, whether it’s music or any other art form. We’re a group of like-minded friends all involved in music industry some way or another. Psych Night hosts flagship events at The Assembly bi-monthly and have smaller events in between at various venues. Apart from a photography exhibition on Austin Psych Fest by Mark Reitz, Doors of Perception will be our first event exploring psychedelic inspired art.

Cape Town is quite an “international” city i.e. the city gets thousands of tourists every year. Being a tattooer at Wildfire Tattoos on Long Street, you must get quite a few strange tourists walking in. What are a few of the weirder/strange/funny comments or requests that you have heard working there?

Apart from some tourists just being extremely odd, there have just been too many. From asking for a South African tribal to just the extend of a language barrier where nothing that comes out of their mouths sound human or appropriate.

Raoul Goetze

How would you describe your favorite type of tattoo to do? Do you have a personal favorite tattoo that you’ve done?

I don’t necessarily have a favourite tattoo that I’ve done, but when I get a chance to interpret a subject matter in my own way, I obviously enjoy the tattoo more seeing that it’ll automatically turn into a style that I would like to do. I really enjoy doing traditional tattoos, also with some sort of geometric elements in them.

What is your opinion on tattooing in South Africa? Do you think that we’re at the level we should be? How do you think we match up to international standards?

I think people underestimate the talent locally. We definitely match up to international standards. You will obviously always get tattoo artists and shops that never went the right route of doing things and poor quality tattoos are the result, but the same problem occurs internationally as well, if not more. The few artists that are truly great with what they do reach international standards without out a doubt. It’s just a matter of doing research and finding the right ones to get tattooed by.

Raoul Goetze

Can you tell us more about your band Wild Eastern Arches? What do you play? How many of you are there? What genre do you play? etc.

We’re a psychedelic band that started in 2012. Our music draws inspiration from various fields such as 70s rock n roll, a bit experimental and I guess shoegaze as well. Psychedelic would probably just be a term used as a main vessel to merge all our individual influences together. We consist of 5 members. I play guitar and bass.

Favourite tattooer, artist, and band?

Favourite tattooer and artist would be Thomas Hooper. Favourite band, either Zeppelin, The Black Angels or Night Beats.

You make ‘psychedelic’ art, and play in a ‘psychedelic’ band. What is your definition of ‘Psychedelic’?

Feeling it.

www.raoulgoetze.com
www.facebook.com/wildeasternarches
www.tattoo.co.za

Raoul GoetzePhoto by Mark Reitz

Raoul GoetzePhoto by Dirk Steenkamp

Raoul Goetze

Raoul Goetze

Raoul Goetze

Raoul Goetze