Faith Forty Seven: Equinox Release

Faith 47 Equinox Release

Faith 47 Equinox Release.
20 March 2015.
5pm GMT
Los Angeles: 10am
New York: 1pm
London: 5pm
Johannesburg: 7pm
Beijing: 1am

The second in a collectable series of intimate books and screen prints.

THE HIDDEN YEARS :: VOLUME TWO
A compilation of photographs taken in the Karoo, Beijing, Jerusalem, Shanghai, Johannesburg, Cape Town, London, Melun, Rochester, Kathmandu, Los Angeles, Miami, Durban, Bangkok, Malmö, Antanarivo, Madrid, Wuhan, Rome, Missouri and Gaeta.
A5 size, 80 pages.
Signed and numbered.
Edition of 100.

BLEED :: SCREEN PRINT
5 layer screenprint on Stardream Antique Gold.
12 x 15 cm.
Signed and numbered.
Edition of 100.

Click here to order.

Faith 47 Equinox Release

FRIENDS Launch on Thursday

Friends Launch RVCA First Thursdays Cape Town

Friends Launch RVCA First Thursdays Cape Town

RVCA First Thursdays Presents
FRIENDS
‘Zine launch & exhibition
& Performance by Medicine Boy

Introducing the first of 3 nationwide free events, welcoming FRIENDS Occasional into the world. We celebrate with a magazine launch as well as a photographic exhibition.

With DJs:
Hey, no!, Look, The Diabolical Electric Eel, Snakes and Far Out!

**Entrance is limited**

About FRIENDS:
Having been conceived as a brand ‘zine and then developed as a men’s lifestyle publication, FRIENDS is welcomed into the world and born a free-of-charge ‘Occasional’: an ongoing series of publications to be released on a project-to-project basis and not on scheduled release dates. Issue 01 is themed ‘THE MALE DAZE’ and features content from around South Africa, Hong Kong, Seoul, New York and London.
#occasionalfriends

FRIENDS – an Occasional on Facebook.
Facebook event link.

Faith 47 Exhibition at Aqua Regalia, London

Faith47 Aqua Regalia Exhibition London

Faith47 Aqua Regalia Exhibition London

FAITH 47 :: SOLO EXHIBITION

AQUA REGALIA :: CHAPTER ONE :: LONDON 2014

Opening Reception: 9th October 2014 / 6pm to 9pm
Exhibition on display: 10th – 19th October 2014 / 11am to 7pm daily
Gallery Location: 91 Brick Ln, London E1 6QL, United Kingdom
Enquiries: Tina@monikerprojects.com

Moniker Projects is proud to present ‘Aqua Regalia,’ the premier London solo exhibition with internationally acclaimed Contemporary artist, Faith47. Following an active street art career spanning more than fifteen years, her work can now be found in major cities around the world. Using a wide range of media, including graphite, spray paint, oil paint, ink, photography and collage, her approach is explorative and substrate appropriate – from found and rescued objects, to time-layered and history-textured city walls and their accretions, to studio prepared canvas and wood.

Aqua Regalia or ‘royal water’ is the alchemical name for a highly corrosive mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acid that transmogrifies, dissolves and changes the most powerful substance – gold.

In Aqua Regalia, Faith embeds found and created objects in an enshrined space and thus, in a manner of the reliquary, pays homage to the sacramental within the ordinary. Torn up begging cards, betting sheets, discarded eviction notices suggest the fall-out of a lost struggle, while visions of supplicants insist upon the power of faith. Eclectic in its mash-up of art as fetish and art as rebooted trash object, it reprises the core question which drives the artist at odds with the cynical neo-liberal force at work today. Such affinities and discordances between hope and yearning seek to restore value and re-inscribe new meaning to the rejected, discarded, the lost or the overlooked.

The restoration of value to discarded things when combined with pictorial conjuring’s of some undivided divinity, suggest a schism between the knowable and the unknowable. Whether the divine resides inside the everyday, or whether it merely intimates an absent-presence. Ultimately it seems that we are dealing with a felt experience – part belief, part yearning.

Along with these found objects are pictorial representations of incarnated divinity: animals, sacred geometry and other symbols. The question is – does the experience attest to the power of things over and above the human apprehension of them, or if the experience compels us to reconsider the object as indivisibly connected to the divine? If the viewer remains unclear it is because this exhibition arrives at a point in history in which it has become impossible to decipher a future, interpret history, let alone grasp the present. By combining found objects and art- incarnate thoughts, Aqua Regalia presents an immersive experience as much as a viewing. In this sacred space, Faith47 asks us to reconsider, and feel the hidden embattled role of the spirit in a secular realm.

www.aquaregalia.com

The LB Project: A European Art Exhibition Through Skateboarding

The LB Project

The LB Project has been created to unite the European skateboard scene through art shows in Berlin, Copenhagen, Barcelona, Paris, Amsterdam and London.

A Year ( June 2014 – June 2015 ) where artists, skateboarders, stores, media and brands will unite to make skateboarding and art accessible to all.

Featuring:
Michael Sieben, Todd Bratrud, Jeremy Fish, Mark Foster, Jeremyville, Kid Creature, Funeral French, Mike Kershnar, Chad Eaton, BB Bastidas, Lucas Beaufort

Everyone who suscribe on this project will have the opportunity to get a chance to win 27 from the 54 unique skateboards.

Registration will end on june 2, 2015 at midnight.

Winners (27) will be announced on june 9, 2015 via the-lbproject.com.

The other half of the artworks will be donated to Skateistan in order to support this NGO to run their fight in Afghanistan and Cambodia.

http://the-lbproject.com/

FORMS: RODAN KANE HART EXHIBITION

Forms - Rodan Kane Hart Exhibition Poster

South African artist Rodan Kane Hart launched his exhibition last night. It’s on now at NIROXprojects, Arts on Main, Johannesburg. Go check it out!

FORMS / S | W
Rodan Kane Hart
12 March – 31 March 2014
NIROXprojects, 264 Fox Street, Arts on Main

NIROXprojects presents FORMS / S | W by Rodan Kane Hart. Following on from Structure, & Pattern Language (2013), Forms / S | W (2014) marks Hart’s third solo showcase in 2 ye­­­ars. The exhibition compromises an entirely new body of work consisting of sculpture, drawing, print & photography. These works follow on from previous points of enquiry regarding the constructed notion of the South African city. After a recent residency at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park in England, Hart has shifted his focus to more closely examining the influence of European architectural forms onto the urban fabric of South Africa.

RSVP to the Facebook event here.

Farshid Moussavi and Michael Kubo sum up the conceptual foundations of the exhibition as a whole in a book titled The Function of Ornament. A statement is made that succinctly deifies the relevance of architectural style and ornament, “Architecture needs mechanisms that allow it to become connected to culture”. Absorbing and capturing the forces that shape society achieve this cultural connection. These forces are then used as material components to work with, forming composite materiality. When two forces found within society, Invisible, meaning; Cultural, Political, and Temporal, and, Visible, meaning; Structural, Functional, and Physical, are brought together, it gives way to, a New Aesthetic Composition. Architectural style is not easily adjustable to the changes in culture and society. Modernists utilized transparency to represent architectural elements of space and structure; Post Modernists used Décor, whereas the Deconstructivists used geometrical collage to replace transparency all together. These concepts express the inextricable relationship between, Inside & Outside, Then & Now and Here & There.

Forms / S | W (S suggesting South = South Africa & W suggesting West = England) at NIROXprojects focuses on the formal influences of European Classism, Modernism and Post Modernism. An array of artistic medium has been utilized to present the historical and personal logic behind Hart’s formally abstracted works. Hart has intentionally incorporated more handcrafted methods with those of mechanical and digital processes, setting up a relationship between subject matter, time, theory and aesthetic. Works on display include…

Charcoal drawings & 35mm Black & White photographs inspired by architectural and natural forms found in the English cities of Manchester, Leeds, Liverpool & London, are presented alongside those depicting the South African cities of Johannesburg & Cape Town. These images explore the construction of spatial context by juxtaposing figurative representations with those of abstracted ones.

Being renowned for his life-sized steel sculptures Hart has taken a more intimate and crafted approach, by producing 4 smaller generative sculpture series consisting of 4 stages (each). Hart sees these sculptures as maquettes and studies for larger experiential projects, asserting the Russian Constructivists as an influence. Finally, a series of linocuts presenting the progression of line to shape and subsequently to form over 4 stages will also be on display.

OPEN HOURS: Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 4pm
NIROXprojects | 264 Fox Street | Arts on Main | MABONENG PRECINCT | Johannesburg CBD | +27 72 350 4326 | www.niroxarts.com

SOUTHBANK LIKELY SAVED

Southbank Skatepark London

Good news for London’s skaters. Recently Mayor Boris Johnson said that he supports the London Undercroft Southbank Skatepark. He still supports the development there, but only if the skatepark remains untouched. The Southbank Centre board have decided to withhold their planning application; “The Board will now undertake a final search for an alternative funding model to keep the widely supported Festival Wing redevelopment scheme alive.

When the original plans were announced, the skate community’s outcry was so loud that it couldn’t be ignored (see Long Live Southbank). They gave the Lambeth Council 20,000 signatures objecting.

This could be a massive win for the skateboarding community, not only in London, but worldwide.

KRYPTONICS NEW UK AMBASSADOR – ROB ASHBY

Rob at Rom

Long time skateboarder, Rob Ashby, has been named as the Kryptonics Brand Ambassador for the United Kingdom. Ashby, 51, is a skateboarder, slalom racer, race organizer and Secretary of the UK Slalom Skateboarding Association. When not skateboarding he is a Commercial Contracts Manager in the Civil Service. Rob started skateboarding in late 1975, when a friend gave him an old Roller Derby Mustang skateboard. Back in the day he skated a bit of everything; freestyle, long jump, high jump a bit of slalom, eventually gravitating towards skate parks and vert with a bit of freestyle and slalom thrown in for good measure. As Rob says, “Street skating back then just meant getting from A to B on your board.” After dabbling is slalom throughout his skating career, Rob began skating slalom seriously again in 2006 and in 2008 and entered a few European races and has never looked back.

Rob is involved in the Long Live Southbank movement and was one of the many that recently skated from Southbank to Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton to deliver over 26,000 individual planning objections.

Ashby has been riding 65mm Kryptonics Greens on his park board and has used them for bowl sessions and has have also ridden them on numerous visits to Southbank – throwing out Bert’s and 360 slides just like the old days. He also rode them on his slalom board at the European Indoor Slalom Championships in December 2013. He made use of his 70mm Reds riding them from Southbank to Lambeth Town Hall with the Long Live Southbank crew to deliver the planning objections.

In addition to representing Kryptonics Star Trac Wheels at skateboarding events, Rob will also be promoting the brand through social media.

In announcing Ashby’s joining the ambassador program, Kryptonics Wheels Brand Director Steve Douglas commented, “We are stoked to have Rob on board as our UK ambassador, his involvement in the UK skate scene throughout the years, along with his efforts in the Long Live Southbank make him a valuable addition to our program”.

The new line of Kryptonics Star Trac Wheels are coming soon to a Revolution store near you and to Revolution Online.

Rob with Slalom Board and Long Live Southbank

Interview with Rob

Tell us a bit about where you live.
I live in Cheam, Surrey, just 13 miles from the centre of London so I get the best of both worlds – far enough out to be reasonably quiet and close to the countryside yet near enough to get into London in half an hour when needed.

When did you start skateboarding?
I first stepped onto a board in 1976. It was a friends’ Roller Derby “Mustang 20” with clay wheels. I remember that on rougher road surfaces you couldn’t keep your feet on the board very long as the vibrations coming through the deck just shook you off! I then made my own from one of a pair of “Jacoskates” which I think I paid 25p for at a jumble sale? They were fitted with barrel shaped black rubber wheels with shielded loose bearings. I made the deck out of a piece of marine ply liberated from a rubbish skip and stuck some strips of emery cloth on it for grip. I learnt a lot on that first board in the subsequent months.

Did you play other sports as kid?
My father loved his football and had been a formidable centre forward in his youth and during his army days but I definitely hadn’t inherited his skills. I enjoyed fencing at school for a while but general “run of the mill sports” left me cold! I know my dad would have preferred me to play football rather than skate. “You and that bloody skateboard, why don’t you play football instead?” He would often say.

Did you skate street or vert to begin with?
When I first started skating in the 70’s you would skate a bit of everything, freestyle, long jump, high jump a bit of slalom, banks and parks. Street skating back then just meant getting from A to B on your board. I mainly skated parks and vert with a bit of freestyle and slalom thrown in for good measure – all on the one board in the beginning.

What attracted you to slalom?
A lot of that goes back to the days at Southbank which as well as bank riding, leant itself ideally to flatland slalom and freestyle. Slalom was always popular in the UK and appealed too many because, at first glance, it seemed easy and achievable on the street. You could practice slalom with empty tin cans, as there were no cones available at that time, and it was easy to pick up. Slalom also had a fair share of coverage in magazines too and racing is always easy to understand.

When did you start racing?
To be honest I didn’t race competitively at all in the 70’s and 80’s. I went to a few Brands Hatch events and may have had a run or three but I never competed as such. In the early years when equipment was fairly expensive I never had my own slalom set up. A new deck or set of park wheels was normally where my spare change went. If I was at Southbank I would often borrow a board to take a few runs on. The courses were quite tight in those days, a lot of this was attributed to the photos of slalom in magazines showing racers like Bobby Piercy and John Hutson. The logic being “That course must be tight for them to generate speed and get themselves in that position” – well there was no You Tube to watch or website to go to. Another factor then was the limited covered dry area to set a course on at Southbank when it rained; 20 cone, 4 foot straight wasn’t uncommon. Southbank was good breeding ground for many of the UK’s first class slalom racers back then and four of them have gone on to win World Championship Slalom titles and they all still race today! So it could be said I was more of an armchair racer – a park skater who dabbled in a bit of freestyle and slalom on the side. I only began skating slalom seriously again in 2006 and in 2008 I entered a few European races along with fellow Brits and European Race veterans Paul Price, Sam Gordon, Louis Selby, Mick Reiss and Ella Roggero and I loved every minute and never looked back.

Rob Frontside Double Axle

What do enjoy about racing?
There is a tremendous sense of family atmosphere amongst the slalom community. I know that in some circles it is often seen as the more geeky skateboarding discipline. I think that this in part because of the plethora of equipment and ways people set their boards up – different truck angles, wheel formula’s/duro’s etc. I guess it is, as Chris Linford put it, the skate equivalent of Formula 1 – you’re trying to tune your board to get the best possible performance out of it. But essentially anyone can try it – just slacken your trucks off and have a wiggle! At some of our races in the UK we have started seeing a few crossovers from longboarding to slalom as well as a few newbies which is always a good thing. Another bonus is seeing so many legendary skaters from the 70’ and 80’s racing slalom – even better that you can get to race them!

Back in the day what colour wheels/size did you ride?
The first Kryptonics I bought were the 1st generation 70mm Red’s which I purchased from Alpine Sports in Knightsbridge, they came with a free “Kryptonics Krazy” sweatshirt – was so stoked! Riding them for the first time was amazing – like nothing I had ever experienced, such a smooth silent ride. Later I went on to ride 60mm Green’s which I had on a Peralta Warptail with Mid Tracks, then came the 65mm Lime Green versions. I also rode Blue CX double conicals, I remember seeing that amazing photo of Steve Alba riding them – the classic frontside edger shot at Pipeline in Skateboarder – a few days after I had got them, I was really stoked on that!

How better were they from the competition?
I guess that they were really out there on their own for a while as far as the choice of compounds and sizes went. There weren’t really any serious competitors around offering different durometer’s and sizes for a while. It’s not like now where you can pretty much go and get any duro and size wheels you wish. Back then Kryptonics were one of the few companies producing wheels that offered a resilient compound for different terrains and scenarios; and of course the adverts in the magazines were legendary.

What was your favorite Kryptonics ad from back in the day?
I think that would be “Tired of the Same Old Juice” closely followed by “The Name Game” – but to be honest they are all noteworthy in their own way.

What is your favorite memory in skateboarding from the 70’s and early 80’s?
Ooo that’s a tough one – So many come flooding back. I think it would have to be skating at Portland (Dorset, UK) Skate Escape in the summer ‘78/‘79in with locals James Davies, Steve Narraway, Piggy and Chris and the old Wareham crew Mark Farmer, Alan Bennett and Steve Grounds – some of the best times!

What is your favorite memory in skateboarding?
That would have to be the smell of a 70’s skate shop – failing that the awesome Wednesday night sessions at Southbank in the early 80’s with the best crew in the World – intense, wild, often rowdy but always the best fun ever and I am happy to say that we are all still in contact after all of these years and in most cases still skating!

Rob European Indoor Champs

What type of work do you do?
I work as a Commercial Contracts Manager in the Civil Service. I am also Secretary of the UK Slalom Skateboarding Association and race organizer.

You’ve been riding the new Kryptos for a couple of months now; can you share your thoughts on the wheels?
I have been riding 65mm Green’s on my park board and have used them for a couple of sessions in a little bowl nearby. I have also ridden them on numerous visits to Southbank recently – throwing out Bert’s and 360 slides just like the old days! I have even used them on my slalom board at the European Indoor Slalom Championships in December. I have been using 70mm Red’s for cruising around and today I rode them From Southbank to Lambeth Town Hall with the Long Live Southbank crew to deliver the planning objections and they just ate up the pavement. This years must have commuting wheel!

How does it feel to be a Kryptonics Wheels International Ambassador?
When I first saw the e-mail from Steve I had to read it over again. I am just so unbelievably honored and completely STOKED to be involved with one of the most iconic skate brands. SUPER STOKED!

We keep hearing about the efforts to save the Southbank skate spot. Can you tell us how it’s going?
The Southbank Centre have submitted an amended planning application for their ‘Festival Wing’ scheme, as well as a new, separate planning application for their proposed replacement “skateable space” under Hungerford Railway Bridge. Obviously this site is lacking any of the history, character or cultural value of the Undercroft. Not to mention that it has 20 trains an hour thundering overhead! If these applications are accepted, it will mean the Undercroft is lost forever, to be replaced by commercial floor space. It is vital that we do our upmost to save this unique iconic London landmark and cultural space! As I already mentioned yesterday I was one of the many that skated from Southbank to Lambeth Town Hall in Brixton to deliver over 26,000 individual planning objections. With this new UK-record-breaking number of planning objections, surely it is time for Lambeth Council to listen to the people, and to save the Undercroft?

How can people help?
Long Live Southbank now has over 100,000 members, with supporters from all over the world. If you wish to help and show your support please visit www.llsb.com where you can become a member, join the supporters, sign the petition and even buy a t-shirt (as worn by Dave Hackett!). There is a Long Live Southbank Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/LongLiveSouthbank, Twitter feed: @Long_Live_SB and Instagram feed: @savesouthbank. By becoming a member, you give official support to the campaign. There is no joining fee but by putting your name officially behind the campaign it will help us to show the importance of the Southbank Undercroft to its users. So please join now folks, fill in the official Southbank Centre Survey too – let them know that you disagree with the direction they’re taking! Your support is very much appreciated.

What’s 2014 look like for you?
Well I think it might have just got a whole lot busier, Ha ha! Hopefully skating more parks and practicing my freestyle! I will shortly be working on the UK slalom racing calendar for 2014 and this year I am hoping to put on another major event at one of the countries favourite motor racing circuits – Oops I have said too much already! In addition to that I look forward to working with everyone at Kryptonics and along with the other Ambassadors helping to spread “A New Wave of Stoke” through 2014 and beyond!

Rob with boards

WHAT NOW TOUR DIARY

UK-based South African Rock Band, WHAT NOW, returns home to embark on their first SA tour in over 8 years! The band will be hitting the road from 18 to 28 September, in support of their debut album release “Move Like A Sinner”, covering all corners of the country. In Association with Sabbath Events, What Now will be taking their explosive Rock Show to venues in Bloemfontein, Cape Town, Stellenbosch, Port Elizabeth, East London, Ballito, Durban, Johannesburg and Pretoria, supported by fellow rockers CrashCarBurn, December Streets, Taxi Violence and ShortStraw. Having grown up in the dusty beach town of Ballito, the band is now based in London and has achieved incredible success away from their South African families and friends. Their title track from the album, “Move Like A Sinner”, has had great airplay on South African radio and the current hit “If Looks Could Kill” has hit #1 on a couple of key radio stations earlier in July!

Here are the dates for WHAT NOW’s “Move Like A Sinner” South African tour, so diarise it now and don’t miss out on seeing them live!Wednesday, 18th September Mystic Boer, Potchefstroom:

Thursday, 18 September: Mystic Boer, Bloemfontein
Friday, 20 September: Dorpstraat Theatre, Stellenbosch
Saturday, 21 September: The Mercury, Cape Town
Sunday, 22 September: Music Kitchen, Port Elizabeth
Tuesday, 24 September: Raggies Sports Bar, East London (PUBLIC HOLIDAY AS WELL)
Wednesday, 25 September: Crush Nightclub, Ballito
Thursday, 26 September: Live-The Venue, Durban
Friday, 27 September: Rumours Lounge, Johannesburg
Saturday, 28 September: Arcade Empire, Pretoria

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SOUTHBANK CENTRE REVEAL NEW SKATEPARK PLANS

London’s Southbank Centre has revealed some new plans for the proposed Hungerford Bridge Skatepark, which is supposed to replace the current space that the Southbank undercroft is using. Southbank Centre commissioned Iain Borden (Professor of Architecture and Urban Culture at the Bartlett School of Architecture) and Rich Holland (Architectural designer at Floda31), who has been involved with a bunch of different sculptures and installations with ‘skatability’ in mind, to illustrate the new plans.

Long Live Southbank managed to get over 40,000 signatures on a petition to save the area from being destroyed by retail developments (worth £120 million). The Southbank Centre think that the space has more potential that is being utilized at the moment though, and if the skaters agree, are willing to spend up to £1 million on building the new space, which is 120 metres further up the river and 10% larger in size.

“We want skating and other urban arts to continue to flourish at Southbank Centre and we hope these proposals show we’re committed to a permanent riverside skate site right next to the Royal Festival Hall.” She added that the current designs are “not set in stone” because “community sites like these are enormously enhanced by organic development through the use and input of the users themselves.” – Jude Kelly

Iain Borden said that “the three visualisations of the site certainly offer everything functionally that is already in the undercroft. They have steps, ledges, things that skaters can manoeuvre onto. They also have a reasonably flat floorspace. I would say it’s better if you just measure it quantitatively. What it doesn’t have is the 35-year history. But give the Southbank Centre their due. Normally a commercial developer comes along and says, ‘You’ve had your free ride, sod off.’ It’s part of the game because skateboarders use space they don’t own. What the Southbank are offering the skateboarders has never been offered to other skateboarding groups anywhere else in the world.”

What do you think about the plans?

www.southbankcentre.co.uk

LONG LIVE SOUTHBANK

Southbank London

For those of you who haven’t heard already, the world famous Southbank in London is under threat by retail development.

Long Live Southbank is a non-profit organisation started by skateboarders to preserve London’s unique and renowned Southbank Undercroft and to represent it’s diverse creative community of skateboarders, BMXers, artists and visitors. They give them a voice and raise awareness about the imminent threat of the destruction of a creative community who have turned a dead space into a thriving visual hub for 40 years. Their mission: To preserve and protect the Southbank Undercroft site from relocation, gentrification and sanitisation. If successful in our bid to preserve this historic London landmark, our role would then be to act as a committee dedicated to looking after the interest of its users and to improve the site in a way which compliments and enhances the original features which first attracted the skateboard community in the early 70’s.

They currently have more that 26,000 members from all walks of life, art forms and social backgrounds.

Sign the petition:
www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/lambeth-council-southbank-centre-boris-johnson-arts-council-england-stop-the-relocation-of-the-southbank-skate-park

Find out more:
Website: www.llsb.com
Article by John Crace: www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2013/jul/29/skating-south-bank-skateboarding-undercroft

NIKE SB GO SKATE DAY LONDON


More Skateboarding Videos

Nike SB Go Skateboarding Day 2013 London

The Nike SB team celebrated Go Skateboarding Day in style with a tour of East, South, Central and West London. Taking in spots old and new they stopped off at the Hackney Wick park, Homerton bumps, Elephant & Castle, South Bank and ended with a final session at BaySixty6 off Portobello Road.

Local skaters joined the team en route to get their stoke on and pick up a limited edition GSD tee.

With new team riders Capser Brooker and Joe Gavin in the mix, a solid 10 hours went down in honour of skating.

#SKATEEVERYDAMNDAY